Policy AL10: Chidham and Hambroo Parish

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Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2147

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Tim Towers

Representation Summary:

Comments on Chidham and Hamrook allocation:
- Designation as a Service Village
- The reference to possible relocation and expansion of Chidham Primary School is simply wrong.
- Housing density
- Mix of housing
- Transport congestion
- Train service infrequent
- Bus service prohibitively expensive
- Impact on Chichester Harbour AONB

Full text:

RESPONSE TO PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT FOR CHIDHAM AND HAMBROOK (POLICY AL10 AND PREAMBLE).

1) Chidham and Hambrook is designated as a 'Service Village' with no explanation as to what, this is. What exactly are we, as residents, servicing? Most residents, I am sure, regard the village as their home and where they build their lives, not as simply a dormitory which they inhabit in order to 'service' local employment opportunities. As such, what happens to the place where they have chosen to live their lives is of some importance to them.

2) i)The reference to possible relocation and expansion of Chidham Primary School is simply wrong. The relocation of Bosham Primary School will make it completely infeasible for any replacement school in Chidham and children will have to make their way along the A259 to Bosham. The proposed development of a minimum 500 homes in the revised Neighbourhood Plan will, therefore, not include a two form entry primary school
ii)The number of houses allocated to the designated sites is in excess of CDC's own guidelines on houses per hectare, and seems to unquestionably accept what developers would like to build - i.e. as many as they can squeeze onto the given sites.
iii) There is no specific mention of social housing in the types of residential accommodation cited. The reliance on what private developers want to build will mean yet more cramped estates of largely three and four bedroom houses that will not meet the needs of the full range of those desperately needing affordable housing.

3) The "provision of high quality development ...... as a sustainable extension of the existing settlements" gives little indication of what 'sustainable' means other than "sustainable forms of transport" with no further explanation. There is a reference in point 3 to 'off-site improvements (including highways)' again to "promote sustainable transport options". It would seem, from this, that 'sustainability' is taken to mean nothing more than the use of private cars. The A259 is already a heavily used transport route for all types of conveyance, including large numbers of heavy lorries and commercial vehicles. Another 500 plus houses (not to mention the 1,250 intended for Soutbourne) will, of course, dramatically increase this already congested route since there is no nearby access to the A27. The local train service from Nutbourne is infrequent and unreliable, and the bus service, whilst frequent and fairly reliable, is prohibitively expensive for commuters and, especially, families. There appear to be no plans to address the obvious need for proper integrated public transport systems, including safe cycle routes. In fact, in relation to both housing development and transport, 'sustainability', whilst stated more than once, is, in practice, ignored. This myopic view of 'sustainability' will seriously diminish the quality of life in this area.
4) There is absolutely no doubt that the building of 500 houses in Chidham, in addition to the 1,750 houses earmarked for Bosham, Fishbourne and Southbourne, will have an irreparably damaging impact on all aspects of the Chichester Harbour AONB. Views of, and from, the water to the South Downs will be irretrievably lost. The water quality will be diminished, threatening the SSSI status of the Harbour, and the distinctive nature of the villages of Bosham, Chidham and Southbourne will be destroyed.
5) The infrastructure of the whole area is already under enormous strain, and there are no serious proposals to mitigate the damaging effects of this excessive and poorly planned development. The whole process appears to be driven by both government diktat and CDC's uncritical acceptance of developer's requirements. The need for more housing is clear. But such development must be focused on the needs of the most vulnerable as well as the financially advantaged. Most importantly, it must be genuinely sustainable in terms of infrastructure, the environment and the special status of areas bordering AONB's and SSSI's. The proposed development fails these needs in every respect.

Attachments:

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2162

Received: 08/02/2019

Respondent: Steven Birch

Number of people: 2

Representation Summary:

Concerns relate to increase in traffic and resultant pollution and congestion; current state of public transport; surface water management; allocation of 500 and impact upon existing environment and infrastructure; risk of coalescence.

Full text:


I am emailing you as our response to the Chichester Local Plan Review 2035 Preferred Approach Consultation December 2018 and SA10 Chidham and Hambrook Parish Council Response. We are presently out of the country and have had problems accessing the Portal on the Councils Website. Similarly as we are overseas we have had difficulty in phoning in. We have been able to access the internet today so hope our response will still be considered.

We have read the Chichester Local Plan Review 2035 Preferred Approach and have read Chidham and Hambrook Parish Councils response SA10 Chidham and Hambrook. We agree with the response of the Parish Council most notably in the following areas:

1. Transport. We have concerns that the proposed number of housing developments in the areas West of Chichester from Southbourne to Fishbourne will very significantly increase the traffic in the area and particularly the A259 by unsustainable amounts. This is likely to have a detrimental impact on the health and wellbeing of residents in the area, not least from increased traffic fumes and congestion resulting from of an increased number of cars. The A259 is not sufficient to provide for the increased traffic levels resulting from the plan. There is no mention of any new slip road or junction on/off the A27 between Emsworth and Fishbourne to reduce the negative impact of increased traffic local to this area. The plan talks of encouraging people to use public transport. What is a significant oversight in the plan is the lack of affordability and the present infrequency of public transport links in this area. This makes an increased take up of bus and train services highly unlikely and traffic pressure on the A259 will increase directly in line with the population density.
2. Surface Flood Water. We have concerns that developments on present agricultural land will push surface rainwater to communities on the Chidham Peninsula south of and near to the A259. The plan states that developments would need to keep risks of flooding to 1 in 100 year events but how will this happen in practice? What compensation will be available for established properties that may flood from this diversion of rain water to cause surface floodwater?
3. The plan for 500 new houses for Chidham and Hambrook appears to be out of scale to the existing environment and infrastructure and risks merging the villages along the route.
4. The local primary school in Chidham is at capacity and primary school provision to meet the needs of increased housing needs to be addressed along with the infrastructure to support it. The present site is already causing issues with traffic at school drop off/pick up and school event times.

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2255

Received: 05/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Stephen Johnson

Representation Summary:

Object to Chidham and Hambrook allocation on following grounds:
- Unequal distribution of housing
- Sustainability appraisal unstuiable
- Landscape
- Density and scale of development

Full text:

The principal objection is to Policy AL10, with reference to the following policies: S1, S3, S26, S29, S30, D3, DM32 and the evidence of the Sustainable Appraisal and the current HELAA study.

Objection to Policy AL10: The allocation of housing for Hambrook, part of the Council's Local Plan preferred option, is disproportionate, and contrary to its policies and inconsistent with its evidence. The CDC preferred option housing allocation of 500 homes is not consistent with the sustainability evidence. CDC may have underestimated the land required in the parish to meet the Local Plan preferred option housing allocation. CDC has not fully considered the impact on local character of the parish, the landscape and wildlife corridors.

A quote from the 'Sustainability Appraisal for the Chichester Local Plan Review - Preferred Approach' referring to the proposal for Chidham & Hambrook:
"The scale of the development will completely alter the existing development.
There would be significant impact to the existing historic village"

1 Sustainability Appraisal - the evidence and decision making
The Local Plan review has failed to make a proper distribution of housing in the district. In particular its evidence and decision making process for arriving at its allocation of housing to Hambrook is flawed.

The distribution strategy.
How carefully has the Council arrived at the housing allocation for Hambrook? When comparing Hambrook with other nearby parishes the number of houses CDC estimated that could be accommodated in Hambrook on its HELAA study preferred sites is not consistent with the study evidence. Meeting the allocation may require the parish to propose development of previously rejected sites.

The Council considered alternative numbers for housing in the parish
In comparing different housing allocation scenarios, the Council looked at different numbers of houses for the various parishes. In many cases these varied significantly.
eg
Southbourne Min 250 Max 1250
East Wittering Min 0 Max 750
Selsey Min 0 Max 750
Fishbourne Min 250 Max 1000
Bosham Min 250 Max 700
Hunston Min 0 Max 1000

Hambrook Min 500 Max 750

Unlike other parishes, it did not consider scenarios requiring fewer than 500 houses in Hambrook, setting it apart from these other parishes.

Sustainability - the evidence
In considering the proposed parish allocation, the evidence of the Council's Sustainability Assessment says
"The scale of the development will completely alter the existing development.
There would be significant impact to the existing historic village"

This is a substantial change of policy from the previous Local Plan where 25 homes was the indicative housing number for Hambrook. This policy change came very much out of the blue. In fact Chidham & Hambrook accommodated 130 homes under the previous local plan despite the Local Plan indicative number, mainly because the delayed Local Plan allowed developers unfettered rights to develop (before the Local Plan and NP were adopted).
How suitable is Hambrook?
The distance to the nearest town centre (Emsworth or Chichester) is further for Hambrook residents than for other nearby parishes.

Of 31 categories of sustainability,
Hambrook is judged inferior for development compared with Fishbourne (for example) in 7 categories

The categories where Hambrook is less suitable for development than Fishbourne are
"Does the option..."
reduce levels of water pollution?
reduce the need to travel?
improve networks for cyclists and pedestrians?
meet local housing needs?
provide access to services and facilities?
ensure that economic opportunities are accessible to all?
avoid the loss of the Best and Most Versatile agricultural land?

and superior in only one category -
Does the option require new waste water treatment capacity? (It is not clear how this distinction has been made. On the face of it the judgement could well be neutral.)

In the Council's preferred option:
Fishbourne is asked to supply 250 homes, compared to Hambrook which is asked to supply 500.

2 Other sustainability issues -

Landscape. Policy S26 refers

The views of the Downs from the area of the Bus stop on the A259 near Broad Rd looking northeast past Flat Farm have been omitted from the Landscape Capacity Study 2018, East West Corridor, Fig 84 (p507)


The views of the Downs from the area of the Bus stop on the A259 near Broad Rd looking northeast

However the area is judged to have Medium/Low capacity for Landscape change. The view northwards from between Broad Road and towards Drift lane towards the South Downs makes a considerable contribution to the local landscape, but in the HELAA study this is land considered to be suitable for development.
Wildlife Corridor Policy S29, S30, DM 32 refer
Located between the SDNP and the Chidham peninsula and Chichester Harbour, the wildlife corridor through Hambrook linking important Green Infrastrucure, is of special sensitivity.
A variety of species commute or forage between the harbour area and the SDNP including mammals, both deer, and bats of which 10 or more species have been recorded. Badgers, while not normally found on the peninsula, have been seen. Smaller species like Hedgehogs, stoats, weasel, moles, and small prey species, and slowworms, toads and frogs use the corridors to extend their access to foraging habitat. Birds including tawny and barn owls, grey heron and migrant species such as Fieldfare and Redwing use these corridors. Development in Hambrook should be constrained by proximity to the wildlife corridor identified by CDC.
Furthermore there is an important wildlife corridor on the west side of Hambrook, running north south, following the Ham stream.
By comparison, the Wildlife corridor in Fishbourne is away from the development area.


3 The Capacity of Preferred Sites The current HELAA study and Policy DM3 refer

CDC may have underestimated the land required to meet the parish housing allocation.
The proposed allocation of 500 houses is linked to the HELAA study which shows preferred sites in the parish of 15 hectares with a capacity for 565 houses.
However this capacity calculation is based on developer estimates.

The Local Plan Preferred Option policy DM3 indicates a density benchmark of 35 houses/hectare but with exceptions eg
"locations adjacent to sensitive locations (i.e. nationally designated areas of landscape, historic environment or nature conservation protection) where a lower density may be appropriate."

A lower density is appropriate in Chidham & Hambrook because of its semi-rural character, the existing low density nature of development in the parish, the desire to provide green space and landscape views, the perceived need for Bungalows for the ageing population, and the proximity of the Chichester Harbour AONB.
The CDC benchmarks mentioned in the HELAA study (a 'living document') which identifies available sites are:
housing densities (30/ha) and developable areas (80%)
This would mean the preferred sites identified would be adequate for 360 houses. That is, the preferred sites identified by the Council are inadequate to provide the parish allocation of houses.
It is not clear how much land the Council anticipate will be required to meet the allocation of 500 homes, or how, or on what basis this figure was finalised.

If this allocation stands, preferred sites (15Ha) will be inadequate. A further 6 Ha of sites, rejected in the HELAA study, may have to be developed. So the impact on Chidham and Hambrook will be greater than envisaged in the Local Plan preferred option.

4 Conclusion
The allocation of 500 homes for Hambrook is excessive, and is not supported by the Council's Sustainability Appraisal. The low provision of amenities, the proximity of the AONB and Wildlife Corridors, limits the development capacity of the land. The HELAA report suggests there is land suitable for development, but the report appears to have misjudged the suitability and capacity of the preferred sites. We are confronted with choosing not just all the preferred sites but in addition, some unsuitable sites and unsuitable housing densities to provide for the houses required by the plan.

From experience we know that housing development comes at the front end of the plan development period, making absorption of these numbers especially problematic. Equally we know that promised amenities frequently do not materialise as envisaged, if at all.
If we build 500 homes in Hambrook, the number of homes in the village since 2010 will have effectively doubled, reducing the openness of the landscape increasing congestion of local roads and schools, and putting pressure on biodiversity and the green spaces that we do have, with little benefit for residents.

"The scale of the development will completely alter the existing development. There would be significant impact to the existing historic village"

Submission in support of policy S30
Biodiversity is essential to the AONB, and the SDNP. Without it they are diminished, as are we. The enjoyment of wildlife is an important part of the life of many residents, and on many levels vital to our wellbeing.
Biodiversity requires suitable habitat, either of a suitable size, or connected to other areas of habitat by a corridor of suitable width that allows wildlife to move from one area to another either to forage or to breed. With the continuous pressure on land, corridors are vital. Habitat that is cut off, and too small by itself to support the natural diversity of life will die. If it is connected to another patch of habitat allowing movement between the two, the habitat may be large enough to support the natural diversity and genetic diversity which is vital to species survival.
Similarly corridors between the SDNP and the Harbour AONB are similarly important for creatures that need to move further as part of their natural cycle of life or in order to forage or breed.

The combination of distant views, landscape, wildlife and biodiversity, habitat, and corridors is vital to our mental and physical wellbeing. It is also vital to the economy of the region. It is why people come to live here. It is why visitors come.

Chichester District is home to a wide variety of wildlife and habitats. To maintain healthy and vibrant wildlife, we need robust corridors so species can utilise them to travel between their habitats.
A particular example is the rare bats that we are blessed with. They need established corridors to move from roosts to foraging areas. Roosts and foraging areas change with the seasons. Bats flying in the dark need established navigational corridors such as hedgerows. They need darkness. If these corridors are disrupted by development we will lose our rare bats. A corridor can be broken by grubbing up part of a hedgerow, or by the proximity of bright lights, or by reducing its width.

Policy S30 must be supported. It is vital that it is enforced robustly. It is not adequate to assume that we need only worry about the identified corridors. There are more corridors than have been identified so far, and every development should be designed to allow it to act as a corridor, as far as possible.

I urge the planners to ensure the proposed Wildlife Corridors are given the due protection, and importance they deserve, and proper consideration to strengthening the policy by identifying additional corridors.

Attachments:

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2271

Received: 01/02/2019

Respondent: Historic England

Representation Summary:

Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Chidham and Hambrook Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 500 dwellings.

However, we consider that Policy AL10 should include a specific requirement to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.

Full text:

Paragraph 1.5 of the Local Plan Review states "This Plan seeks to balance the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development". "Balance" implies some gains and some losses. However, this does not reflect the four bullet points that follow this sentence.
In addition, Paragraph 8 of the National Planning Policy Framework explains that;
"Achieving sustainable development means that the planning system has three overarching objectives, which are interdependent and need to be pursued in mutually supportive ways (so that opportunities can be taken to secure net gains across each of the different objectives)".

We therefore suggest that "balance" is not the most appropriate word.

The three overarching objectives include; "c) an environmental objective - to contribute to protecting and enhancing our natural, built and historic environment......". We therefore welcome the fourth bullet point of paragraph 1.5; "Protecting and enhancing the unique and special qualities of our environment".

Reword the first sentence of paragraph 1.5 as; "This Plan seeks to deliver the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development in mutually supportive ways".

Paragraph 1.16 explains that the National Planning Policy Framework reiterates the importance of significantly boosting the supply of new dwellings, whilst ensuring provision for other development needs including economic growth.
Whilst not untrue, we consider that this does not fully represent the Government's objectives and policies as set out in the Framework and therefore gives the misleading impression that the Framework is only about housing supply and economic development.
In fact, the protection and enhancement of the natural, built and historic environment is also identified as important in the Framework e.g. in the environmental overarching objective for the planning system as set out in paragraphs 8, 11b)i and 20 d).
Reword the final sentence of paragraph 1.16 as:
"The importance of significantly boosting the supply of new dwellings is reiterated, whilst ensuring provision for other development needs including economic growth and protecting and enhancing the natural, built and historic environment".
Paragraph 31 of the National Planning Policy Framework requires "The preparation and review of all policies should be underpinned by relevant and up-to-date evidence". We previously expressed our concerns about the historic evidence base for the policy framework for the district when commenting on the Issues and Options stage of the Local Plan Review;
"We are aware of the Council's series of Conservation Area Character Appraisals, The Future Growth of Chichester Study and the Landscape Capacity Studies. However, the Council's "Supporting documents" webpage has no historic environment documents and we are not clear if the Council has other historic environment evidence e.g. is there an extensive urban survey of Chichester or other townscape or characterisation study ? Is there an urban archaeological database ? Is there a list of locally important heritage assets ? Has the Council undertaken a survey of grade II buildings at risk ?".
However, looking at the Council's Local Plan Review Preferred Approach Plan - Evidence Base - December 2018 webpage, the only specific historic environment evidence base document identified is the Chichester Historic Environment Strategy and Action Plan. Whilst we welcome the Strategy, we have previously expressed the view that we do not consider that it forms, by itself, an adequate historic environment evidence base for the Local Plan Review.
We are aware that the Council has a list of locally important buildings, but that Chichester was not covered by the West Sussex Extensive Historic Town Surveys - perhaps as it was thought a candidate for the more intensive approach of an Urban Archaeological Database (UAD). However, we are not aware that such a UAD exists, and whilst we are aware of the Council's Historic Environment Record (the availability of which accords with paragraph 187 of the National Planning Policy Framework), we do wonder if the archaeological evidence and significance of the city is fully understood and readily available. We suggested that the Historic Environment Strategy could set out actions to enhance understanding and management of the archaeological resource of the historic city and we would be pleased to discuss how we might be able to assist with this.
We will expect the Council to have an adequate, up-to-date and relevant historic environment evidence base and to demonstrate in the Pre-Submission Local Plan how that historic evidence base has informed and influenced the Plan's policies and site allocations.
The historic environment evidence base for the Local Plan Review should be set out on the Council's Evidence Base webpage. If there are indeed gaps in that evidence base, then these should be filled and that evidence taken on board in preparing the Pre-Submission Local Plan Review document.
Historic England welcomes and supports the reference to the historic environment of Chichester district, and the heritage assets therein, in paragraphs 2.27 and 2.28 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.

Historic England welcomes and supports, in principle, the identification of "Protect the area's valuable heritage and historic assets" as one of the challenges faced by the Plan.
However, the National Planning Policy Framework requires local plans to deliver an environmental overarching objective which includes "to contribute to conserving and enhancing our natural, built and historic environment" (paragraph 8 c)) and to include strategic policies to make sufficient provision for "conservation and enhancement of the natural, built and historic environment" (our underlining).
The Framework therefore requires local planning authorities, through their local plans, to do more than just conserve the historic environment i.e. to enhance it as well. This should be identified as a challenge (although it is also an opportunity).
Reword the last bullet point of paragraph 2.28 as; "Protect and enhance the area's valuable heritage and historic assets".
Historic England welcomes, in principle, as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework, the reference to the historic environment in paragraph 3.1;

"It is the intention of the Council to enable the delivery of infrastructure, jobs, accessible local services and housing for future generations while supporting the historic and natural environment".

However, the National Planning Policy Framework refers to "conserving and enhancing our natural, built and historic environment" (paragraph 8 c)) and the "conservation and enhancement of the natural, built and historic environment". We therefore suggest that "supporting" should be "conserving and enhancing" as terminology more consistent with the Framework and possibly ambiguous than "supporting".

Reword the first sentence of paragraph 3.1 as;
"It is the intention of the Council to enable the delivery of infrastructure, jobs, accessible local services and housing for future generations while conserving and enhancing the historic, built and natural environment".
Historic England welcomes the inclusion of "Have a quality of life that is enriched through opportunities to enjoy our local culture, arts and a conserved and enhanced heritage;" in the Vision as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes "As an historic walled cathedral city, its rich cultural and architectural heritage will be conserved, enhanced and promoted together with the views and landscape value afforded by its setting" in paragraph 3.4 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports "The conservation and enhancement of the historic environment, the high quality landscapes and the agricultural and other rural activities that support it will remain paramount" in paragraph 3.14 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports, in principle, the Strategic Objective "Conserve and enhance landscape and heritage" as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework. However, we suggest that it could be rather more ambitious e.g. "Conserve, enhance, increase appreciation and enjoyment of and access to heritage"
Paragraph 4.2 states that; "New development must achieve sustainable development principles and must not adversely affect the character, quality, amenity or safety of the built environment, wherever it occurs". The implication is that this is a requirement of the National Planning Policy Framework, but we cannot find this exact wording in the Framework.

However, paragraph 127 of the Framework does set out what planning policies and decisions should ensure of developments, including "are sympathetic to local character and history" and "establish or maintain a strong sense of place". In addition, paragraph 185 of the Framework requires plans to set out a positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment, which should take into account "the desirability of new development making a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness".

We therefore consider that the final sentence of paragraph 4.2 should be revised to more closely reflect the requirements of the National Planning Policy Framework.

Reword the final sentence of paragraph 4.2 as ""New development must achieve sustainable development principles, must not adversely affect the history, quality, amenity or safety of the natural, built and historic environment and should make a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness and establish or maintain a sense of place". (Alternatively, these could be set out as bullet points for clarity).
Historic England welcomes and supports "enhance the quality of the built, natural, historic, social and cultural environments" in Policy S2 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Although the historic environment is not identified as a constraint or as an opportunity for enhancement in paragraph 4.12 as a factor in the definition of the Settlement Hierarchy, we note that paragraph 4.14 does explain that consideration has been given to other factors in determining whether a settlement is a suitable location for additional housing growth. We would like to think that these other factors include the potential effects on the historic environment.
Historic England welcomes and supports "where possible enhances the character, significance and setting of heritage assets" as one of the considerations to guide potential discussions on a possible site for a new settlement in paragraph 4.33 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports "it is acknowledged that new development needs to be planned sensitively with special regard to the unique character of the city's historic environment and setting, and should be underpinned by historic characterisation assessments" in paragraph 4.90 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Nevertheless, we suggest that reference should also be made to heritage impact assessments to underpin the planning of new development.
Reword paragraph 4.90 to read;
"it is acknowledged that new development needs to be planned sensitively with special regard to the unique character of the city's historic environment and setting, and should be underpinned by historic characterisation assessment and heritage impact assessments".
Historic England welcomes and supports "such development will need to be sensitive to the
historic character of the city" in paragraph 4.91 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports "conserve and enhance the city's historic character and heritage", "Enhance the city's existing heritage, arts and cultural facilities", "Protect views of the cathedral" and "All development will be required to have special regard to the city's historic character and heritage. Development proposals should be underpinned by historic characterisation assessments and make a positive contribution to the city's unique character and distinctiveness" in Policy S13 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Nevertheless, we would like to see a reference to heritage impact assessments to underpin development proposals.
We also wonder if it would be helpful to have a specific policy to protect important views, allied to or combined with a policy for tall buildings in the historic city ?
Reword Policy SP13 to read "Development proposals should be underpinned by historic characterisation assessment and a heritage impact assessment......".
Historic England welcomes and supports "Any development proposals within the vicinity of the site must clearly demonstrate how the development would protect, and where possible enhance, the operation and heritage of the site as a motor-circuit and airfield" in Policy S15 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports "All proposals must ensure that the cultural and historical significance of the military facilities (and any other significant archaeological assets) located on the site, are understood and inform the scope of future development of that site" in Policy S17 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
However, we would prefer "significant archaeological assets" to be retained in situ.
Reword Policy S17 as;
"All proposals must ensure that the cultural and historical significance of the military facilities (and any other significant archaeological assets) located on the site, are understood and inform the scope of future development of that site, with any significant archaeological assets retained in situ".
Paragraph 2.2 of the Plan notes that the North of the Plan Area has "rich cultural and heritage assets". We are surprised, therefore, that paragraph 4.128 has no mention of these assets.
Reword paragraph 4.128 "This part of the plan area is predominantly rural with few sizeable settlements, characterised by undulating countryside with a high proportion of woodland, typical of the Low Weald landscape. Conserving the rural character of the area, with its high quality landscape and natural and historic environment, is a key objective".
Historic England welcomes and supports "Conserve and enhance the rural character of the area, the quality of its landscape and the natural and historic environment;" in Policy S19 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes paragraph 5.1 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Strictly-speaking, historic parks and gardens are registered for their special historic interest rather than their protection per se, but one of the purposes of Registration is to encourage appropriate protection and inclusion on the Register is a material consideration in the determination of planning applications.
Historic England welcomes paragraph 5.5 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports Policy S20, particularly the references to history, historic character and local identity in clause 1, sense of place in clause 2, character in clause 8 and high quality public realm in clause 11 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
However, we would also like to see a specific clause relating to heritage assets.
Add a new clause; "conserves or enhances the significance, special interest, character and appearance of heritage assets".
Historic England welcomes and supports paragraph 5.12 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes, in principle, paragraph 5.13 states that "Where development proposals might affect a heritage asset the Council will identify and assess the particular significance of the heritage asset and seek to avoid or minimise any conflict between the conservation of the heritage asset and any aspect of the proposal" as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
This very largely reflects paragraph 190 of the National Planning Policy Framework, but the Framework requires local planning authorities to take the particular significance of any heritage asset that might be affected by a proposal into account when considering the impact of a proposal on a heritage asset, "to avoid or minimise any conflict between the heritage asset's conservation and any aspect of the proposal". The requirement is clear - any conflict should be avoided or minimised; it is not sufficient to merely "seek to" avoid or minimise that conflict.

In addition, paragraph 189 of the Framework states;

"In determining applications, local planning authorities should require an applicant to describe the significance of any heritage assets affected, including any contribution made by their setting......Where a site on which development is proposed includes, or has the potential to include, heritage assets with archaeological interest, local planning authorities should require developers to submit an appropriate desk-based assessment and, where necessary, a field evaluation.

There is, therefore, a clear onus to be placed upon the applicant/developer to identify and describe the significance of any heritage assets affected.

Paragraphs 193, 194, 195 and 196 of the Framework set out how local planning authorities should consider the impact of a proposed development on the significance of a designated heritage asset. We believe that this could usefully be summarised in the Plan.

Reword paragraph 5.13;
"Where development proposals might affect a heritage asset the Council will identify and assess the particular significance of the heritage asset and take that significance into account when considering the impact of a proposal on a heritage asset, to avoid or minimise any conflict between the heritage asset's conservation and any aspect of the proposal".
Add new paragraphs;
"For applications which affect, or have the potential to affect, heritage assets the applicant will be expected to describe the significance of the asset and its setting, using appropriate expertise; at a level of detail proportionate to its significance and sufficient to understand the potential impact of the proposal; using appropriate references such as the Historic Environment Record and, if necessary, original survey (including, for assets of archaeological interest, an appropriate desk-based assessment and, where necessary, a field evaluation)";
"When considering the impact of a proposed development on the significance of a designated heritage asset, the Council will give great weight to the asset's conservation. Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), will require clear and convincing justification"; and

"The Council will refuse proposals that would lead to substantial harm to (or total loss of significance of) a designated heritage asset unless it can be demonstrated that the substantial harm or total loss is necessary to achieve substantial public benefits that outweigh that harm or loss, or all of the circumstances in paragraph 195 of the National Planning Policy Framework apply. For proposals that would lead to less than substantial harm to the significance of a designated heritage asset, the Council will weigh this harm against the public benefits of the proposal".

Historic England welcomes and supports Policy S22, which we consider complies with the requirements of paragraphs 17 and 20 of the National Planning Policy Framework to contain strategic policies and for those strategic policies to make sufficient provision for the conservation and enhancement of the historic environment.

We also consider that the policy forms part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework. We consider that the word "positive" is significant, and we believe that the Plan (and Council) should be proactive in the conservation and enhancement of the historic environment. National Planning Practice Guidance states "Such a [positive] strategy should recognise that conservation is not a passive exercise".
We therefore consider that the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment is not a passive exercise but requires a plan for the maintenance and use of heritage assets and for the delivery of development including within their setting that will afford appropriate protection for the asset(s) and make a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness. We therefore look to local plans to contain commitments to positive measures for the historic environment. We therefore welcome the commitments within Policy S22 to positive actions, including heritage at risk, which paragraph 185 requires to be part of that positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment. However, we do feel that the supporting text could helpfully explain a little more about the Council's approach to heritage at risk, perhaps borrowing some text from the Chichester Historic Environment Strategy and Action Plan.
We also consider that the positive strategy should comprise recognition throughout the Plan of the importance of the historic environment, of the historic environment's role in delivering the Plan's vision and the wider economic, social and environmental objectives for the Plan area, and of the potential impacts of the Plan's policies and proposals on the historic environment.
We are pleased to have identified a number of references throughout the Plan to the historic environment and we therefore consider that the Plan sets out an adequate positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of that historic environment as required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework and that the Plan is therefore compliant with that paragraph.

Add a new paragraph explaining what "heritage at risk" is and the Council's approach to assets at risk e.g.

"Unfortunately, heritage assets can be at risk from neglect, decay or other threats. Designated assets at risk, with the exception of Grade II secular buildings and Grade II places of worship used less than six times a year, are identified on the Historic England Heritage at Risk Register. Within the district outside the South Downs National Park, six assets are on the Register (February 2018): three scheduled monuments, two listed buildings and one conservation area. The Council will actively seek to address threats to heritage assets by recording and monitoring Heritage at Risk in Chichester District, publishing it on our website and working with the owners of heritage assets at risk to find solutions and secure repairs to bring them back into active use, including where appropriate viable new uses and/or proposals for enabling development so they are preserved for future generations."

Historic England suggests that paragraph 5.37 could also refer to the range of heritage assets to be found in the countryside of the Plan area.
Reword paragraph 5.37 as;

"It is valued for many reasons, including agriculture and community food production, its landscape qualities including the special characteristics of Chichester Harbour and Pagham Harbour, the setting it provides for Chichester City and other towns and villages, its range of heritage assets, including historic landscapes, and the opportunities it provides for recreation and biodiversity".
Historic England welcomes and supports clause d of Policy S32; "integrate with the surrounding built, historic and natural environments" as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
As noted in paragraph 6.12, the Chichester Entrenchments Scheduled Monument lies partly within and partly immediately to the north of the site. Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework identifies Scheduled Monuments as being assets "of the highest significance", substantial harm to or loss of which should be wholly exceptional.

We have previously commented (as English Heritage) on the allocation of this site during the consultation on the Key Policies. We explained that development close to the earthworks might harm the historical value of the heritage asset by interrupting views between its parts and introducing incongruous land-use in its immediate surroundings. This in turn would make it difficult to appreciate the asset's open rural setting, its extensive linear nature and its purpose of enclosing large areas of open land.

Accordingly, we initially objected to the form of the allocation in the Key Policies, but subsequently withdrew that objection following amendments to the boundary of the Strategic Development Location on its northern side so that the boundary ran along the south edge of the belt of woodland in which the scheduled monument sits, thereby entirely excluding the monument from the SDL, and the allocation of the northern area of the amended site as open space.
We are therefore pleased to see that the Strategic Site Allocation still excludes the scheduled monument. We also welcome and support the following requirements of Policy AL1, which we consider provide, in principle, adequate protection for the Scheduled Monument in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework:
6. Landscaped to protect priority views of Chichester Cathedral spire;
7. Keep land north of the B2178 in open use, free from built development, to protect the natural history interest of both Brandy Hole Copse, and the setting of the Chichester Entrenchments Scheduled Monument;
8. Conserve, enhance and better reveal the significance of the Chichester Entrenchments Scheduled Monument and other non-designated heritage assets and their settings and to record and advance understanding of the significance of any heritage assets to be harmed or lost;
However, this comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Historic England makes no comment on the principle of the Shopwyke Strategic Site Allocation, which we note is an existing allocation.
However, the Grade II listed barn at Greenway Farm is located to the south-west of the site and the Grade II listed Shopwyke Grange and the Grade II* listed Shopwyke Hall are located to the south-east. Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification". The paragraph identifies Grade II* buildings as assets of the "highest significance".

Historic England therefore welcomes and supports, in principle, the following requirement of Policy AL2, which we consider provide, in principle, adequate protection for the listed barn and Shopwyke Hall in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework:
7. Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and conserve and enhance the historic significance of the listed barn at Greenway Farm and the cluster of buildings associated with the grade II* listed Shopwhyke Hall, which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan.
However, we consider that reference should also be made to the Grade II listed Shopwyke Grange. This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Reword criterion 7;"Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and conserve and enhance the historic significance of the listed barn at Greenway Farm, the listed Shopwyke Grange and the cluster of buildings associated with the grade II* listed Shopwhyke Hall which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan".
According to our records there are no designated heritage assets on this site, although the Grade II listed Shopwyke Grange and Grade II* listed Shopwyke Hall lie to the north-east of the allocated area, Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification". The paragraph identifies Grade II* buildings as assets of the "highest significance".

We note that criterion 7 of Policy AL2 requires the development of the Shopwyke Strategic Site Allocation to ".......conserve and enhance the historic significance of the......cluster of buildings associated with the grade II* listed Shopwhyke Hall, which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan. We have suggested in our comments on this policy that it include reference to the listed Shopwyke Grange, and we consider that this requirement should also be included in Policy AL3 to provide, in principle, adequate protection for the listed barn and Shopwyke Hall in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework.

Historic England welcomes and supports criterion 8 of Policy AL2; "Existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire are to be protected". However, this comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Reword criterion 8 as;
"Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and conserve and enhance the historic significance of the listed Shopwyke Grange and the cluster of buildings associated with the grade II* listed Shopwhyke Hall which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan".
Historic England makes no comment on the principle of the two sites at Land at Westhampnett/North East Chichester Strategic Site Allocation, which we note were part of a broad strategic development location in the adopted Local Plan.
However, the site abuts the Graylingwell Hospital Conservation Area, the buildings of the former 'pauper lunatic asylum' (including the Grade II listed chapel), the Grade II listed Summersdale Farmhouse and a Grade II registered park and garden. Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification".
Historic England therefore welcomes and supports, in principle, the following requirement of Policy AL4, which we consider provide, in principle, adequate protection for these designated assets in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework:
9. Development should be designed with special regard to the Graylingwell Hospital
Conservation Area, the buildings of the former 'pauper lunatic asylum' and the Grade II registered park and garden in which they sit, and to other listed buildings in the vicinity of the site and their settings. Important views of Chichester Cathedral spire from the area should be protected;
This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Historic England makes no comment on the principle of the Southern Gateway Strategic Site Allocation.
However, the site includes a row of Grade II listed buildings on Southgate and a number of non-designated heritage assets (the southern gateway of the city had Roman roads converging upon it and this is likely to result in enhanced archaeological potential in this part of the city. The development of suburbs in the medieval and later periods is a further factor with both the canal and railway as examples of later uses of the area. There are a number of buildings of interest, including the former Law Courts and Bus Garage). Part of the site lies within the Chichester Conservation Area and there are listed buildings adjacent to the site.
Paragraph 184 of the National Planning Policy Framework states heritage assets "are an irreplaceable resource, and should be conserved in a manner appropriate to their significance, so that they can be enjoyed for their contribution to the quality of life of existing and future generations". Paragraph 194 of the Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification".

Historic England therefore welcomes and supports, in principle, the following requirements of Policy AL5;

3. Respect for the historic context and make a positive contribution towards protecting and enhancing the local character and special heritage of the area and important historic views, especially those from the Canal Basin towards Chichester Cathedral;
9. Include an archaeological assessment to define the extent and significance of any
archaeological remains and reflect these in the proposals, as appropriate;
However, we consider that these requirements should be strengthened to ensure that they provide adequate protection for these assets in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework. In addition, we consider that Policy AL5 should promote more strongly the opportunity to use the heritage of the area to help define its character and the desirability of new development making a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
These comments are without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Reword clause 2 as follows;
Proposals should include a high quality distinctive design response appropriate to this gateway location and based on the character and heritage of the area, which establishes a clear hierarchy of streets and spaces, active frontages of buildings which front streets and spaces with clearly defined building lines;
Reword clause 3 as follows;
3. Respect for the historic context and make a positive contribution towards protecting and enhancing the local character and special heritage of the area, including the Conservation Area, listed buildings (both on and adjacent to the site), non-designated buildings of historic interest and important historic views, especially those from the Canal Basin towards Chichester Cathedral;
Reword clause 9 as follows;
9. Include an archaeological assessment to define the extent and significance of any
archaeological remains and reflect these in the proposals;
According to our records, the site Land South-West of Chichester (Apuldram and Donnington Parishes) contains no designated heritage assets. We therefore have no comment on the principle of the allocation, although we would expect its potential for non-designated archaeology to have been assessed, with reference to the Council's Historic Environment Record, in accordance with paragraph 187 of the National Planning Policy Framework which states;
Local planning authorities should maintain or have access to a historic environment record. This should contain up-to-date evidence about the historic environment in their area and be used to:
a) assess the significance of heritage assets and the contribution they make to their environment; and
b) predict the likelihood that currently unidentified heritage assets, particularly sites of historic and archaeological interest, will be discovered in the future.
Historic England welcomes and supports clause 3:
3. Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and the setting of the Chichester Harbour Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan;
This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
According to our records, the site at Highgrove Farm, Bosham, contains no designated heritage assets. We therefore have no comment on the principle of the allocation, although we would expect its potential for non-designated archaeology to have been assessed, with reference to the Council's Historic Environment Record, in accordance with paragraph 187 of the National Planning Policy Framework which states;
Local planning authorities should maintain or have access to a historic environment record. This should contain up-to-date evidence about the historic environment in their area and be used to:
a) assess the significance of heritage assets and the contribution they make to their environment; and
b) predict the likelihood that currently unidentified heritage assets, particularly sites of historic and archaeological interest, will be discovered in the future.
This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.

Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Fishbourne Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 250 dwellings.
However, we note that one of the specific issues that need to be taken into account in planning for development at Fishbourne identified in paragraph 6.65 of the Plan is "Protecting the heritage assets of Fishbourne and their setting".
We welcome the recognition and identification of this issue, but we consider that it should be included as a specific requirement in Policy AL9, to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.
Add the following clause to Policy AL9;
"Demonstration that the development would not have an adverse impact on the significance of heritage assets, including listed buildings and the Fishbourne Roman site Scheduled Monument, or the character or appearance of the Fishbourne Conservation Area".
Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Chidham and Hambrook Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 500 dwellings.
However, we consider that Policy AL10 should include a specific requirement to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.
Add the following clause to Policy AL10;
"Demonstration that the development would not have an adverse impact on the significance of heritage assets.
Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Hunston Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 250 dwellings.
However, we note that one of the specific issues that need to be taken into account in planning for development at Hunston identified in paragraph 6.77 of the Plan is "Respecting the setting of listed buildings and the Hunston conservation area".
We welcome the recognition and identification of this issue, but we consider that it should be included as a specific requirement in Policy AL11, to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.
Add the following clause to Policy AL11;
"Demonstration that the development would not have an adverse impact on the significance of heritage assets, including listed buildings, or on the character or appearance of the Hunston Conservation Area."
According to our records, the site Land north of Park Farm, Selsey, contains no designated heritage assets. We therefore have no comment on the principle of the allocation, although we would expect its potential for non-designated archaeology to have been assessed, with reference to the Council's Historic Environment Record, in accordance with paragraph 187 of the National Planning Policy Framework which states;
Local planning authorities should maintain or have access to a historic environment record. This should contain up-to-date evidence about the historic environment in their area and be used to:
a) assess the significance of heritage assets and the contribution they make to their environment; and
b) predict the likelihood that currently unidentified heritage assets, particularly sites of historic and archaeological interest, will be discovered in the future.

This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Southbourne Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 1,250 dwellings.
However, we consider that a specific requirement should be included in Policy AL13 to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.
Add the following clause to Policy AL13;
"Demonstration that the development would not have an adverse impact on the significance of heritage assets, including listed buildings, or on the character or appearance of the Prinsted Conservation Area."
Historic England has no comments on the principle of the allocation Land West of Tangmere.

However, the site is close to the Tangmere Conservation Area and a number of listed buildings, including the Grade I listed Church of St Andrew. Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification". The paragraph identifies Grade I buildings as assets of the "highest significance".

Historic England therefore welcomes, in principle, clauses 5 and 8 of Policy AL14

5. Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and reduce any impact on views from within the National Park;
8. Conserve and enhance the heritage and potential archaeological interest of the village, surrounding areas and World War II airfield, including the expansion or relocation of the Tangmere Military Aviation Museum.
However, we consider that clause 8 should be strengthened to ensure that it provides adequate protection for these assets in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework. In addition, we note that paragraph 6.95 of the Plan identifies, as one of the specific issues need to be taken into account in planning the development and site layout at Tangmere, "Conserving and enhancing the setting of the historic village (particularly the Conservation Area"). We consider that this should be included within Policy AL14.
This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Reword criterion 8 as follows:

8. Conserve and enhance the heritage and potential archaeological interest of the village, surrounding areas and World War II airfield, particularly the Conservation Area and the Grade I listed Church of St Andrew and including the expansion or relocation of the Tangmere Military Aviation Museum.
Add a new criterion as follows:
""Conserve and enhancie the setting of the historic village, particularly of the Conservation Area".
Historic England welcomes and supports clause b of Policy DM3 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports clauses 1 c and 2 e of Policy DM5 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes, in principle, clause 2 of Policy DM13 but considers that the policy should be, in the first instance, to avoid adverse impact on the historic environment as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework. We consider that the wording used in Policies DM3 and DM5 would be appropriate.
Reword clause 2 of Policy DM13 as:
"Is located so as not compromise the essential features of nationally designated areas of landscape, historic environment or nature conservation protection".
Historic England welcomes and supports clause 1 of Policy DM17 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports clause b of Policy DM20 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports paragraph 7.129 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Many farm buildings that are now redundant for modern farming needs are likely to be of historic interest - it is acknowledged that farm buildings are generally under-represented on the National Heritage List for England. Historic England considers that Policy DM21 should include stronger protection for such buildings as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Add a new criterion to Policy DM21 as follows:

"Features of architectural or historic significance are retained and, where the building forms part of a historically significant complex of buildings, consideration is given to the future use(s) of those buildings and the impact of the proposal on the integrity and character of the complex".
Historic England welcomes and supports, in principle, paragraphs 7.154 - 7.161.
However, we consider that paragraph 7.154 should be reworded to clarify the distinction between designated and non-designated heritage assets (the latter including buildings on the Local Buildings List for Chichester).
Reword paragraph 7.154 as follows:
"There are a large number of "Heritage Assets" (as defined in the National Planning Policy Framework), both designated and non-designated, in the plan area. Designated assets are Listed Buildings, Scheduled Monuments, Conservation Areas and Registered Historic Parks and Gardens. Non-designated assets include archaeological sites (although the remains may be of national significance equivalent to scheduled monuments, and which should be considered subject to the policies for scheduled monuments) and non-listed buildings which have been identified as locally important, such as those on the Local Buildings List for Chichester City and 'positive' buildings within Conservation Areas."
Historic England welcomes and supports in principle, Policy DM27 both as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment as required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework and also as a non-strategic policy for the conservation and enhancement of the historic environment as suggested by paragraph 28 of the Framework.
However, we consider that clause e. should specify the (wholly) exceptional circumstances in which permission for a proposed development that would lead to substantial harm to (or total loss of significance of) a designated heritage asset would be granted i.e. where it can be demonstrated that the substantial harm or total loss is necessary to achieve substantial public benefits that outweigh that harm or loss, or all of the circumstances in paragraph 195 of the National Planning Policy Framework apply.

We would also welcome the policy being more detailed in terms of the considerations to be taken into account when assessing development proposals affecting the different types of heritage asset, as do, for example, Policies EH10, EH11, EH14 and EH15 of the West Oxfordshire Local Plan 2031. These policies were developed with Historic England and the Inspector that examined the Local Plan 2031 shared our concern that the historic environment policy in the Local Plan 2031 provided inadequate locally specific detailed policy guidance and considered the more detailed policies necessary for the Plan to be sound.

(However, we do acknowledge that the Inspector that examined the Key Policies development plan document considered the modified historic environment policy (Policy 47) put forward by the Council with our support was sufficient for the Plan to be sound, and that Policy DM27 in the Local Plan Review very largely repeats Policy 47).

Reword clause e. of Policy DM27 as follows;
"Development involving substantial harm to or loss of designated heritage assets will
only be granted in exceptional circumstances (wholly exceptional circumstances for
designated assets of the highest significance) i.e. where it can be demonstrated that the substantial harm or total loss is necessary to achieve substantial public benefits that outweigh that harm or loss, or all of the circumstances in paragraph 195 of the National Planning Policy Framework apply.

More details of the considerations to be taken into account when assessing development proposals affecting the different types of heritage asset. We would be pleased to work with the Council on a revised policy or policies.

Paragraph 7.195 of the Plan notes that the remnants of canals "are important early 19th Century historic features in the landscape of the coastal plain and warrant protection".
Historic England agrees with this statement, but Policy DM33 makes no mention of protecting the historic significance of the remaining canal sections.
Reword the first paragraph of Policy DM33 as follows;
"Development that makes provision of through navigation or enhancement of the Chichester Ship Canal and the Wey and Arun Canal will be supported where it meets environmental, ecological, historical and transport considerations."
Historic England welcomes and supports clause 3 of Policy DM34 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2310

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Portsmouth Water Ltd

Representation Summary:

Policy AL10 'Chidham and Hambrook' is a large site and may need to be considered in combination with 'Southbourne' and 'Bosham'. There are no large diameter mains in the area and mains reinforcements may be required.

Full text:

Spatial Vision
Portsmouth Water note that there are significant additional housing allocations to the west of Chichester and on the coastal strip. These sites will need to be assessed for water supply and funding included in the Infrastructure Charging scheme. (See Map 4.1 Key Diagram)

It is not clear what water storage capacity is being referred to in Section 3.19. Portsmouth Water will review the provision of Service Reservoirs, for day to day use, and has re-started development of a large raw water storage reservoir at Havant Thicket. The reservoir, when combined with Portsmouth Water's existing sources and enhancements to its groundwater sources, would create sufficient
surplus to support an additional flexible daily transfer of treated water from Portsmouth Water are to Southern Water without detriment to Portsmouth Water's resilience.

Southern Water requires this transfer to help meet a significant deficit in its Southampton East, Southampton West and Isle of Wight resource zones. This deficit arose after Southern Water agreed to reduce its abstraction licences on the Rivers Test and River Itchen at a public inquiry in March 2018, to help protect the environment.

It is not clear that the water demands of the Horticultural Development Areas have been assessed. It is possible that these businesses will rely on rainwater harvesting and storage but changes in licencing regulations mean that 'Trickle Irrigation' is no longer exempt from abstraction licencing.

Groundwater abstraction in the coastal plain will require an impact assessment under the Habitats Regulations. (Section 4.75)

Spatial Strategy

Policy S12 sets out how development can make effective use of existing infrastructure. Portsmouth Water agree that the siting and timing of development can assist with the economic provision of water resource infrastructure. It also states that safeguarding existing infrastructure, such as water mains and aquifers, is important. Portsmouth Water would urge developers to check for existing infrastructure and for source protection zones that may limit development options.
Water infrastructure is not funded through CIL but a separate 'Infrastructure Charge' payable for each individual house. This is designed to pay for all off-site water infrastructure such as mains reinforcements, service reservoirs and supply. Development to an agreed program will help this system work effectively.

Strategic Policies

Policy S27 'Flood Risk Management' refers to Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) and the need to control surface water run-off. It should also refer to aquifer protection and the need for caution when using infiltration systems especially deep bore systems. This applies particularly when the site is in, or close to, a source protection zone.

Policy S31 'Wastewater Management and Water Quality' refers to higher standards in the Building Regulations for water consumption to reduce pollution in the harbours. Portsmouth Waters 'Water Resources Management Plan' is based on lower per capita consumption and we have an aspiration for all customer to reach 100 litres/head/day by 2050. This is no substitute for reducing overall flows
to sewage treatment works by the control of groundwater infiltration and surface water drainage.

Strategic Site Allocations

Policy AL1 'West of Chichester' does not mention water supply so we assume that the site has reverted to a conventional system with sewerage pumped to Tangmere WWTW and water supplied by us. Portsmouth Water has provided provisional designs for this system and there are no existing large diameter water mains on the site. Costs for reinforcement of the water mains will be recovered by the new Infrastructure Charge and on site mains are likely to be provided by a third
party. Information on how reinforcement of the water mains is recovered by the Infrastructure Charge can be found in Portsmouth Water's Developer Charging Arrangements on our website under https://www.portsmouthwater.co.uk/developers/.

Policy AL2 'Shopwyke' is already under construction and has a conventional water supply system with all elements provided by us. Costs are being recovered via the Infrastructure Charge and on-site charges.

Policy AL3 'East of Chichester' is a new strategic site and there are no large diameter mains crossing it. This is an old landfill and may contain material that can damage plastic pipes. On site mains may need to be protected or be more expensive to ensure water quality is maintained.

Policy AL4 'Westhampnett' Phase 1 is already under construction and account has been taken of the large diameter main that crosses the site. Phase 2 is an extension of the existing Greylingwell site but it is not clear if this has been allowed for in the design of this 'Inset Appointment'. Portsmouth Water do not own the mains and there may be a single point of supply.

Policy AL5 'Southern Gateway' is an inner city development with a good water supply system. The reference to the 'efficient use of water' is confusing because many of the other strategic development sites also drain to Apuldram WWTW. All sites need to be water efficient but not follow the example of the 'Code for Sustainable Homes'. Sites were developed in Chichester that used rainwater harvesting to meet the Code objectives but were able to use higher water use fittings such as power showers. This led to properties producing more sewage than equivalent water efficient homes. This did not achieve the objective at Apuldram. An alternative provision might be to reduce infiltration but it is not clear how this would be funded or who would carry out the work.

Policy AL6 'South West Chichester' is crossed by a large diameter main that will have to be reflected in the road layout or diverted. The proposed link road may offer an alternative route for the main.

Policy AL7 'Bosham' is situated on the old A27 and there are no large diameter mains in the area.

Policy AL8 'East Wittering' is at the extremity of the distribution system and may be expensive to supply.

Policy AL9 'Fishbourne' allocation is not site specific and it is difficult to comment on the feasibility of water supply. Any off site costs will be recovered via the new Infrastructure Charge. Portsmouth Water have public water supply abstractions in the area and development is likely to be located in a source protection zone for our Fishbourne public water supply abstraction. Under this policy, where development is in a source protection zone, the policy should also refer to groundwater quality
protection and the additional requirements when using infiltration systems in particular deep bore systems. Further guidance on Portsmouth Water's preferred approach to development relating to groundwater quality within our catchments can be found within 'Portsmouth Water's Groundwater Protection Guidance notes' which are attached to this response and also available to view on our website under https://www.portsmouthwater.co.uk/developers/groundwater-protection/.

Policy AL10 'Chidham and Hambrook' is a large site and may need to be considered in combination with 'Southbourne' and 'Bosham'. There are no large diameter mains in the area and mains reinforcements may be required.

Policy AL11 'Hunston' allocation is not site specific.

Policy A12 'Selsey' is at the extremity of the distribution system and has seen previous housing growth. Reinforcement of the water mains may need to be provided.

Policy AL13 'Southbourne' is supplied from a different distribution system to Chichester. This is a very large housing allocation and this may need to be considered in combination with 'Hambrook' and 'Bosham'. There are sufficient water resources for all the housing allocated to Portsmouth Water's area of supply. It is the location of the housing site in relation to existing trunk mains and
service reservoirs that determines the cost to supply. Local reinforcement of the water mains may be required.

Policy AL14 'Tangmere' housing allocation has increased by 30% and we may need to repeat the modelling that has already been done. There is also uncertainty about the water supply to the HDA which seems to rely on rainwater harvesting for future growth. The housing development and the HDA could have an impact on our source protection zone. Under this policy, where development is in a source protection zone, the policy should also refer to groundwater quality protection and the
additional requirements when using infiltration systems in particular deep bore systems. Guidance should be sought from Portsmouth Water's Groundwater Protection Guidance for development.

Policy AL15 'Land at Chichester Business Park, Tangmere' Portsmouth Water have public water supply abstractions in the area and the site allocation is likely to be within a source protection zone for our Aldingbourne public water supply abstraction. As above, where development is in a source protection zone, the policy should also refer to groundwater quality protection and the need for caution when using infiltration systems in particular deep bore systems. Please refer to Portsmouth Water's Groundwater Protection Guidance for further information.

Development Management

Policy DM10: 'New Employment Sites' Development proposal should be compatible with other policies in the Plan, in particular DM9 'Existing Employment Sites' to ensure that the development is otherwise acceptable. Policy DM9 states that development should 'not generate unacceptable levels of water pollution' and this should include groundwater pollution. This requirement should also be applied to Policy DM10, especially when the site is in, or close to, a source protection zone.

Policy DM15 'Horticultural Development' Developments at Tangmere HDA have relied on infiltration to dispose of excess surface water. This policy states that development should 'not generate unacceptable levels of water pollution' and this should include groundwater pollution. Portsmouth Water have public water supply abstractions in the area and the potential impacts must be assessed for any SUDS. The EA 'Abstraction Licencing Strategy' (ALS) may give an indication about the
availability of groundwater but it does not cover the derogation of existing supplies.

Policy DM16 'Sustainable Design and Construction' covers the use of Building Regulations to control water use. Portsmouth Water have an aspiration to reduce overall water use to 100 litres/head/day and this policy will help to achieve that aim.

Policy DM18 'Water Management' using SUDS needs to take account groundwater quality and should avoid direct infiltration into the chalk aquifer. This is especially important within the source protection zones.

Policy DM29 'Biodiversity' Portsmouth Water has legal duties to protect and where practical enhance biodiversity and has an active program of work on it's own land. This work is now expanding to include projects on other people's land in association with 'Catchment Management' activities. We would look to CDC for support in areas such as Bosham Stream, Lavant Stream and Fishbourne Stream where schemes could be developed in partnership with local housing developments.

Policy DM35 'Equestrian Development' can have a direct impact on water quality including groundwater quality. Portsmouth Water support the protection of water courses and aquifers.

Appendix 'E' Monitoring Framework

Policy S12 covers the provision of infrastructure but it is not clear how records of completed projects will be collected or stored.

Policy S26 covers biodiversity improvements and Natural England should be consulted on priorities and record keeping.

Policy S31 covers water consumption which is only available for the whole Company area in the WRMP Annual Review.

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2364

Received: 05/02/2019

Respondent: West Sussex Local Access Forum (WSLAF)

Representation Summary:

Opportunities for the provision of green infrastructure links to the wider countryside within these Policies are welcomed. It is particularly relevant to the Coastal Plain where the current provision of multi-user routes is very limited. Improvements in this area would comply with the objectives of the West Sussex Rights of Way Management Pan 2018-2028.

Full text:

Para 3.2 bullet points 5, 9 & 10 - these objectives are supported
The Local Plan Strategic Objectives
Para 3.19 Health & Well-Being bullet point 1 - this objective is supported
Policy S18 Integrated Coastal Zone Management for the Manhood Peninsula : Objective 5 - while the objective is supported it should apply to all Non-Motorised User (NMU) activity. This could best be achieved by ensuring at least one multi-user route is provided around and through developments linked to the existing Public Right of Way (PRoW) and wider access networks.
Design : Policy 20 bullet point 5 - the objective is supported but should recognise that this includes multi-use PRoW for the use and benefit of all.
Planning for Health and Well-being Para 5.9 - this objective is supported but should encourage all NMU activity not limited to walking and cycling.
Transport Infrastructure
Para 5.15 - the inclusion of bridleways is welcomed but there should be specific inclusion of PRoW
Para 5.16 - the wording is misleading as the provision of bridleways on the Coastal Plain is very limited, restricting access for cyclists and equestrians. Upgrading suitable PRoW to bridleways would improve access for all NMUs and contribute to the West Sussex Transport Plan (2011-2016) to improve safety for all road users.
Policy S23 : Transport and Accessibility bullet point 8 - inclusion of PRoW is welcomed
Policy S32: Design Strategies for Strategic and Major Development Sites
Bullet points b, e & g - the aims of these are welcomed but any new routes are linked from new developments to the wider PRoW and access networks
Policy AL1 : Land West of Chichester
Para 4 - this development provides an opportunity to improve access links to the wider access network
Para 10 - there is an opportunity here to provide a multi-user PRoW for all NMUs
Policy AL2: Land at Shopwyke (Oving Parish)
Para 9 - any bridge should be for all NMUs, including equestrians, to reinstate the route severed when the A27 was re-aligned.
Policies AL3 - AL14 - opportunities for the provision of green infrastructure links to the wider countryside within these Policies are welcomed. It is particularly relevant to the Coastal Plain where the current provision of multi-user routes is very limited. Improvements in this area would comply with the objectives of the West Sussex Rights of Way Management Pan 2018-2028.

DM15 Horticultural Development - there is an opportunity within the Runcton area to enhance and upgrade routes for NMUs should the land be used for housing at a later date.
Policy DM23 Green Infrastructure
Para 7.185 - the examples should specifically include PRoW.
Bullet point 4 - more positive wording to recognise the improvement proposals could make to the access networks is preferred.
Policy DM34 Open Space, Sport and Recreation.... - the aim to retain, enhance, enhance access and increase the quantity and quality of PROW and the links to them is supported. This would be of great benefit to all NMUs is all new routes/links are multi-user.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2403

Received: 25/01/2019

Respondent: Mr John Newman

Representation Summary:

The exit from the cycle track on the southern side of the A259 to the east side of Chidham is presently dangerous because of the road layout and the warning sign about cyclists being several; yards too late and often obscured by foliage. Where there is a cycle track in Chidham, parking on that track is not uncommon. There is also a significant gap in the cycle track through much of Chidham. Moreover this is part of a national cycling route, and will become even more significant with more development in Chidham and points west.

Full text:

Introduction
I agree with most of the points made in the Introduction, not least the points about affordable housing, (para 2.9) for which there is a clear demand and inherent because of the 0.75%pa rise in population and the yawning gap between incomes and house prices.
I will acknowledge that I am writing as a baby boomer, but I note the above average presence of senior citizens in the CDC area and your anticipation that it will rise to 35% by 2015 (para 2.8). This surely has implications for the facilities that CDC, and probably more so WSCC because of its responsibilities for social care, will need to provide, and I do not notice any focus on this in your introductory section. In fairness I am slightly more encouraged when I read paragraph 3.19
I would also ask how many of the young people educated in the area return here to live and work after qualifying. And if the number is low, why, and what do you propose to do to ameliorate the haemorrhage?
Spatial Vision and Strategic Objectives
I agree with your list of items in paragraph 3.2. That said, I note that you state that people should be able to "move around safely and conveniently with opportunities to choose alternatives to car travel (my emphasis). This surely has major implications for public transport, for walking, and for cycling, and surely these should be highlighted in this introductory summary. I shall look forward to seeing what you have to say about these later in the document.
I agree with paragraph 3.3 - but what do you mean by your hope to "balance the ageing population"? That could sound horribly ominous!
In para 3.4 I understand the wish to diversify the local economy - but where are these new organisations to go? You talk about "new sustainable neighbourhoods on the eastern, western and southern sides of Chichester, which could, especially when one thinks of Whitehouse Farm, appear to presage a level of growth which will frighten many. I think that the example of Summersdale, where I live, does not bode entirely well, for it is largely devoid of any community centres and has no public transport in the evenings.
In para 3.6 you speak of a "highly accessible transit corridor" Do you really mean this, says he thinking of the state of Chichester by-pass, the queues that I see coming east on to the Fishbourne roundabout in the morning, and the rush-hour queues from Bognor? Perhaps I could add what the all too predictable impact of Whitehouse Farm will be on both the Fishbourne roundabout and the Northgate gyratory.
Re para 3.10, my understanding is that rather more than "moderate levels of growth" are proposed between Fishbourne and Southbourne, and I shudder at the impact on the A259, all the more so when I think of all that traffic passing through the narrow main road at Fishbourne and also coming out on to what is already a very dangerous Fishbourne roundabout, which I do my best to avoid now!
Turning to paragraph 3.19 I welcome, amongst the other points you make there, the references to affordable housing, to air quality, to the section on health and well-being, and (at a time of fears about global warming) to the reference to flood risk.
Spatial Strategy
I welcome the list of services and facilities mentioned in paragraph 4.12, as that most certainly is not the case in present-day Summersdale.
In fairness I recognise the increased demand for housing as mentioned in para 4.22, as this is inherent in an area of rising population and probably more single-person households (which I have not seen mentioned). I suspect, for instance, that I am far from alone in living singly since bereavement in the family house where I have lived for forty years and from which I have no plans to move. That said, enormous care will be needed in selecting the areas for expansion and the implications for infrastructure and community buildings. Moreover you are clearly right in para 4.30 to refer to longer term growth.
You are clearly right to talking of "meeting the housing needs of the plan area and tackling homelessness" in para 4.34. In all honesty I was appalled when I saw the numbers of people sleeping out late a night when I happened to walk home at a late hour last March. I did not think that such an inhuman state of affairs obtained in Chichester, and am horrified that it still apparently does. I strongly agree with paragraphs 4.43 and 4.44. I welcome the policy statement S6, even if I think that we really need is a return to council house building, as was used to solve even worse problems in the decades after 1945.
Re para 4.66 I have very mixed feelings. It has pleased me not to see the extent of boarded up properties that one sees elsewhere. That said:-
* I write as one who detests shopping and does very little within Chichester city centre; I probably use only about half a dozen shops and those only occasionally.
* I know that my wife always preferred to go to Worthing and can think of a friend who prefers Southampton.
* I think that you have to recognise as a fact of life that more people are going to shop on-line, not least for reasons of price, and that that inherently impacts on traditional retail shopping.
* I tend to do my shopping on the edge of town as that is where the big supermarkets are and parking is easy. I would take some persuasion to change that.
* Looking at policy S9, do you really need more shipping in the Southern Gateway at a time of decline of town centre retail shopping?
Providing Supporting Infrastructure and Services
Paragraph 4.80 should also include cycle tracks and bus routes if you really want to move away from the use of private cars.
I note that paragraph 4.81 includes a reference to "appropriate revenue support". I fully agree and wish that I could believe that this present austerity-obsessed government would actually provide it.
Your policy S12 seems right to me.
East-West Corridor
I think that you are somewhat optimistic in paragraph 4.88. The 700 bus service is very good, but what about other routes, especially in the evening? The present state of the Chichester by-pass is dreadful, and the Fishbourne roundabout is a particular source of danger, moreover one likely to be made worse by more traffic coming from Whitehouse Farm and from further development along the A259.
Policy S13 seems fine to me.
Paragraphs 4.95-98 describe a situation that I know only too well. I would add that as a cyclist I find the western end of The Hornet and St Pancras to be by far the most dangerous pieces of road in Chichester, and I write as one who usually does not mind where he cycles.
I do not agree with paragraph 4.101 - I think that a park and ride is badly needed, arguably from both the west and the south.
Re policy S.14:-
* Re peripheral car parks, if you want to revive the city centre, is that really the answer? What about those who find walking difficult or who do not want to carry heavy shopping half a mile to their car?
* I shudder what the queues will be like with a bus lane up to the Bognor roundabout.
* I think that the present bus/rail interchange is quite good, though I think that you need safer crossing of the road and seats in the bus station
* I do not notice any statement about solving the problems caused by the level crossings by Chichester Station. Having had to wait there for over five minutes yesterday while a train was sitting in Chichester Station I feel bound to ask whether there cannot be some mechanism to bring the gates down just before a train is due to leave, and when you are going to have either a bridge or an underpass there.
Re paragraphs 4.103-105, wshat consideration has been given to the transport consequences of such development, especially given the absurd decision to remove the Oving lights?
Given that I live in Maplehurst road, you will not be surprised that I have noted policy S15. Essentially I welcome this policy, not least, as having some pretentions to being a musician, I am very aware of noise, and the weekends where un-silenced racing is allowed are truly a misery, which ideally would be stopped as unbelievably selfish and insensitive and at very least should not be allowed to expand beyond the one such meeting per year. In fairness the banks erected some years ago have made a difference, and for the most part aircraft do behave themselves. I also think that any housing development closer to Goodwood Airfield should be out of the question, as the noise would be intolerable to anyone with normal hearing. In policy S16, point 2 I think that un-silenced racing should not be allowed despite their loss of amenity, as the consequent noise is not reasonable.
Re paragraphs 4.111-115, what do you think is going to be the impact of 1600 new houses in that area - to amenity and the rural aspect; to the A259; to traffic through Fishbourne; and the already dangerous Fishbourne roundabout? I think that the scale of this development is highly questionable for these reasons.
Strategic Policies
Looking at policy S20, I agree with all the points that you make. I would add:-
* The need for a public transport system that does not stop in the evening, and
* The need for good bicycle access. When I think that at least twice a promised access to Centurion Way has not been delivered, I think it fair to make that point, especially if you really do want to get people out of their cars.
Re paragraph 5.16 I find it sad that you do not mention in your strategic corridors that the cycle track adjacent to the A259 going west from Chichester is part of cycle route NCN2.
Re paragraph 5.22 our roads are going to be even more over capacity with significantly more housing development. I have already referred several times to my concerns over the dangerous Fishbourne roundabout.
Re paragraph 5.27 I welcome the interest in cycling provision. Living in Summersdale it takes me less than ten minutes to cycle into the city centre - in fact by far the quickest way I can get there. For the most part it is safe, I think, but with the glaring exception of the Northgate gyratory. Whoever designed that clearly forgot that a cyclist is at his/her most risk when pulling away, so to expect cyclists to stop at each exit is a massive deterrent. This cyclist prefers not to use the cycle lane in order to have safer crossing at each exit. I find the St Pauls Road exist especially dangerous. I would also like to have paint markings on the raised kerbs at each exit for safety in the dark.
More generally, if you are in the Low Countries, it is exceptional for cyclists can have two way traffic in what it is a one-way street for motorists - I have seen so many no-entry signs there with "uitgezonderd fietser" below. In fairness there is some of this in Chichester, but I think that there is scope for more.
I also think that Chichester centre needs increased provision for cycle parking, for instance adjacent to the Little London car park, where there is plenty of potential space, and at the eastern end of East Street, where I find the present racks often to be full.
I would also like you to think how cyclists can be safer at the western ends of The Hornet and St Pancras, which are the two roads in Chichester which make me feel very chary.
With the additions of the points made in the previous paragraphs and also restating a need for evening bus services, I generally support the points made in policy S23, though I would repeat what I have already said about expecting people to park too far away from the city centre if you really want people to come there, and I would extend this point by saying that if you are going for distant parking, a park and ride becomes essential. I am agnostic about the Birdham Road to Fisbourne proposal, as I do not know enough about it to comment.
Re policy S24 I would make a particular plea for the Lavant Gap, which is important both to Lavant and Summersdale especially as an important part of our amenity. And we did not fight to save it to have a northern by-pass trundling through there!
I agree with policy S27 and would add that I can remember the floods some fifteen years ago and looking out at the River Lavant east of Maplehurst Road to see how far the waters were going to spread. That too me (besides proximity to Goodwood) would be a major factor in my opposing any development there. I am aware that the Pagham Rife project subsequently ameliorated the risk, but I still think that it needs to be borne in mind, especially given the impact of global warming.
I agree with policies S28 29, 30, and 31. I would make a particular point of air and noise pollution.
Strategic Site Allocations
I agree with policy S32,
How can you write paragraph 6.8? You will know as well as I do that cycling links are not good, and will be worse if Centurion Way is to be diverted. Also how are cyclists supposed to get into the city from the northern end of Whitehouse Farm - down St Paul's Road and coming on to the Northgate Gyratory (which will also be receiving significantly more motor traffic? Please!! I hope that you also know that the plans could well include a really dangerous junction on Centurion Way that is the entrance from Bishop Luffa Close.
As for motor traffic, the same point about St Paul's Road applies. And as for the southern end, surely you know what that is going to do to local roundabouts, not least the dreadful Fishbourne roundabout?
In terms of recreational disturbance, (para 6.12) why is there no reference to Centurion Way?
The points above all are relevant to policy AL1.
Re policy AL2 I do not know enough to comment in much detail. That said, I am concerned about transport access. I know that I am not alone in detesting coming up to the Bognor roundabout from Bognor and often prefer the safer route via the Oving traffic lights. Has any account been made of how such traffic, which is not inconsiderable will be affected, and how this will make the journey from Bognor to Chichester significantly worse than it presently is?
Re policy AL5 I accept the case for redevelopment, though was far from impressed with the last proposal I saw and commented on at the time; I thought, and still think, that the road alternations then proposed were insane and asking for more rather than less jams. I welcome the references to access for cyclists and pedestrian. I am not clear when there are references to the bus depot as to whether that includes the bus station. If you want people to come to Chichester centre, bus access needs to be close; moreover the present bus station is properly close to the railway station, which is important for integrated travel. I do not see any reference to taking away the present crossing gates, which are a serious impediment to traffic at the moment, both on Stockbridge and Basin Road; I think that that is a bad omission.
Re policy AL9 I lack the detailed knowledge usefully to comment, but would ask how far the present state of the A259 has been borne in mind in planning both in Fishbourne and further west from Chichester. It is narrow and at times congested now - major development can only exacerbate such problems.
Re policy AL10 I can comment only as one who fairly often cycles east-west along the A259. The exit from the cycle track on the southern side of the A259 to the east side of Chidham is presently dangerous because of the road layout and the warning sign about cyclists being several; yards too late and often obscured by foliage. Where there is a cycle track in Chidham, parking on that track is not uncommon. There is also a significant gap in the cycle track through much of Chidham. Moreover this is part of a national cycling route, and will become even more significant with more development in Chidham and points west.
Re policies AL11 and AL12 please bear in mind the need for cycle access and for the proposed cycle track between Chichester and Selsey (via Hunston) to develop, especially if you really mean to develop non-motor transport (and also as a valuable and healthy amenity) and bearing in mind how dangerous the B2145 is.
Re policy AL13 cycling provision to the west of the roundabout presently is reasonable; it is not good west of the roundabout. My comments about NCN2 refer here too.
Development Management
I am especially pleased to see paragraphs 7.2, 7.4, 7.6, and 7.8, as with an ageing population and baby bookers such as me passing 80 within ten years or so, increased specialist provision is inevitably going to be necessary. This is not to downplay other specific groups, eg students - I simply write from an area of specific knowledge. I agree with policy DM1.
The principles behind policy DM2 seem right to me and I am pleased to see recognition of the need for affordable housing. I would make specific reference to resolving homelessness, young families with not much money, and people in the twenties moving to a new area to start work.
I agree with what you are saying in policy DM8. I have raised my concerns about such issues as cycling routes, bus services, parking and the impact on existing crowded and/ or dangerous routes earlier in this response.
I can see why you are seeking to protect the city centre and prevent an excessive dominance of out of town areas, all the more so as I have seen this in the USA. That said, I find shopping on the edge of town a lot easier -things are in the same place; parking is easier; prices tend to be better. And how far are you crying for the moon as on-line shopping takes off? I for one would take a lot of persuasion to do much shopping in a city centre especially with poor parking. So, while I accept most of what you say in policy DM12, it is with this big proviso.
I agree with policies DM13 and DM14.
I think that any new building should have to incorporate solar panels (re policy DM16). I know how much electricity my solar panels have saved me, and, were I younger and further solar installation not so expensive (it would take me more than a decade to get my money back) I would seriously consider more to provide solar energy for heating and electricity storage.
We are now so aware of air quality issues that I am very pleased to see policy DM24. I also agree with policy DM25 and would add that this should be a significant issue (because of the noise pollution emanating from Goodwood) for any development east of Maplehurst Road.
Re policy DM33, last time I was there I thought that the canal towpath was very dangerous at the western end, particularly for anyone trying to ride a bicycle there.
My apologies but I do not know enough about the later policies usefully to comment.

Summary
In case it helps for me to summarise what I have been seeking to say:-
* As a cyclist I have inevitably had a lot to say about present inadequacies in the network. These need remedy if you really want people to get their bikes out in a city that is made for cycling and feel safe in so doing. Moreover there are the clear health and pollution gains from more cycling, and it is actually often the quickest way from a resident anywhere in the city to get into the centre.
* Housing is important - to resolve homelessness; to provide affordable housing; to meet the needs of young families with not much money or young singles moving here to begin a job/ career.
* There are particular issues re an ageing population and the increased needs are so predictable now even if perhaps not immediate.
* If you really want people on buses, fares have to be lower so that they are competitive with the marginal cost of a car journey for a family, which they are not at present. Services need to be good and to include the evenings.
* I think that there is a danger of Canute tendencies re retail when I think of the attractions of edge of city shopping let alone on-line trading.
* This is linked with car parking - reasonably central car parking and/or a park and ride are crucial if you really want to maintain/expand the city centre.
* The present situation over the level crossing is unacceptable.
* The Fishbourne roundabout is unacceptably dangerous, and the present "by-pass" is a denial of your hopes of an easy east-west transit.
* I am pleased to see the sections on air and noise pollution, and also the encouragement of solar electricity, and I hope that these will really mean something

Attachments:

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2408

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: South Downs National Park Authority

Representation Summary:

We consider that the policy wording for the A259 corridor Strategic Site Allocations could be more robust and proactive with regard to conserving and enhancing the National Park. In particular, it could provide more active direction to applicants in order to ensure adverse impacts are minimised locally, and in relation to the National Park. For example, with regard to green infrastructure, each of the
A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies (AL7, AL9, AL10 and AL13) include a criteria requiring the provision of green infrastructure.

Criterion 5 welcomed but could be reworded to ensure developers consider impact before creating scheme.

Full text:

The SDNPA and all relevant authorities are required to have regard to the purposes of the South Downs National Park (SDNP) as set out in Section 62 of the Evironment Act 1995. The purposes are 'to conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the area' and 'to promote opportunities for the understanding and enjoyment of the special qualities of the national park by the public.' The Authority would appreciate reference to Section 62 being added to
paragraph 1.31 of the draft Plan.

Duty to Cooperate

As set out in our previous response, the SDNPA has a set of six strategic cross-boundary priorities.
I would like to take the opportunity to again highlight these which provide a framework for ongoing Duty to Cooperate discussions:
* Conserving and enhancing the natural beauty of the area.
* Conserving and enhancing the region's biodiversity (including green infrastructure issues).
* The delivery of new homes, including affordable homes and pitches for Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Showpeople.
* The promotion of sustainable tourism.
* Development of the local economy.
* Improving the efficiency of transport networks by enhancing the proportion of travel by sustainable modes and promoting policies which reduce the need to travel.

Conserving and enhancing the natural beauty

We welcome the requirement in policies S26 (Natural Environment) and DM28 (Natural Environment) to ensure that development proposals have no adverse impact on the openness of views and setting of the SDNP. It is noted that a substantial amount of new homes are proposed on the A259 corridor between Emsworth and Chichester. This is a sensitive stretch of land in the coastal
plain between the coast, the south coast railway and the A27. This corridor provides the connection, including intervisibility, between the protected landscapes of the South Downs National Park and Chichester Harbour AONB, for example views of the channels within the Harbour from the Trundle and Stoke Clump.
We note the intention of identifying settlement gaps and look forward to seeing the evidence base and the proposed gaps in the Regulation 19 iteration of Chichester Local Plan Review 2035, particularly as to how they will contribute to safeguarding the relationship between the SDNP and Chichester Harbour AONB. We would welcome the opportunity to work with CDC on this matter.

Locations identified for development

Development in the CDC Local Plan Review 2035, particularly along the A259 (policies AL7 Highgrove Farm Bosham, AL9 Fishbourne Parish, AL10 Chidham and Hambrook Parish, AL13 Southbourne Parish) corridor, have the potential to deliver a significant cumulative adverse impact on the setting of the National Park and its important relationship with the Chichester Harbour AONB.
We consider that the policy wording for the A259 corridor Strategic Site Allocations could be more robust and proactive with regard to conserving and enhancing the National Park. In particular, it could provide more active direction to applicants in order to ensure adverse impacts are minimised locally, and in relation to the National Park. For example, with regard to green infrastructure, each of the
A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies (AL7, AL9, AL10 and AL13) include a criteria requiring the provision of green infrastructure, and we would suggest this could be re-worded as follows: 'Identify opportunities are taken for and secure the expansion and provision of multifunctional green infrastructure into the wider countryside and protected landscapes of the South Downs National Park, and Chichester Harbour AONB, including between settlements and facilities.'

Reference to considering and minimising impact on the SDNP in each of the A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies (AL7, AL9, AL10 and AL13) is welcomed, for example criterion 5 of policy AL9:
Fishbourne Parish. However, this could be usefully re-worded to ensure that developers do not create a scheme and only consider the impact afterwards. Wording to direct people to 'respect and respond to the National Park landscape, its setting and purposes prior to development design' avoids the risk of relying upon ill-informed and inappropriate mitigation measures This matter could also be usefully
addressed in relevant Strategic and Development Management policies elsewhere in the Local Plan concerning design, landscape, and the South Downs National Park. We would be happy to work with CDC on this matter.

We note Strategic Policy S32, which requires proposals for housing allocations and major development sites to be accompanied by a site-wide design strategy. We would strongly encourage masterplans and development briefs for each allocation (or settlement where the sites are to be allocated through a Neighbourhood Plan) to come ahead of applications and demonstrate positive design interventions which respond directly to landscape/SDNP sensitivities. We would be happy to be involved in shaping these as consultees in order to achieve the best quality scheme. These interventions could be written in to the policy wording.

There is an opportunity for allocation policies to seek to deliver the joining up of existing, and/or improvements to, the network of RoW (Equestrians, Cyclists and Pedestrians) to enable and encourage access into the National Park in accordance with the National Park's Second Purpose.
Further comments on specific allocations:
* Policy AL1 (Land West of Chichester) - We welcome the consideration of the Centurion Way in criteria 10. However, we would ask for stronger policy wording to explicitly state that development must not adversely affect, and preferably enhance usability of, Centurion Way connecting Chichester with the SDNP.
* We note that Policy AL4 (Land at Westhampnett/NE Chichester) still refers to Lavant Valley greenspace but we query if this is likely to be secured now based on planning applications submitted. We would suggest that criteria 12, last sentence, could also refer to securing offsite improvements/upgrades for cycleway links
* Policy AL6 (Land South-West of Chichester (Apuldram and Donnington Parishes)) should address the important opportunity to secure a safe off-road connection between the Centurion Way and Salterns Way as the two flagship and largely safe off-road multi-user trails linking Chichester with (respectively) SDNP and Chichester Harbour AONB. We would welcome the opportunity for further dialogue and joint working on this matter with CDC.
* We welcome criterion 5 of policy AL14 (Land West of Tangmere). It is a sensitive site due to the impact on clear views of the site from important locations in the SDNP such as the Trundle and Halnaker Hill. We therefore ask that criterion 5 is expanded to emphasise and address the sensitivity of the site
Specific wording comments on other policies/paragraphs:

We have the following comments on the following specific paragraphs:
* Para 2.29 (challenges and opportunities facing the Plan Area): We suggest that the 7th bullet point should say 'Protect and enhance the character of the area including the Chichester Harbour AONB and the setting of the SDNP'.
* Policy S20 (Design): As mentioned above regarding the A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies, we consider that the wording of this policy could be more proactive by including wording to direct people to 'respect and respond to the National Park landscape, its setting and purposes prior to development design'.
* Policy S25 (The Coast): Paragraph 5.44: We suggest adding 'serves to provide important scenic views from the water across to the SDNP which should be conserved'.
* Policy S26 (Natural Environment): We suggest deleting reference to 'openness' and to include reference to views from and to the National Park.
* Policy S32 (Design Strategies for Strategic and Major Development Sites): We suggest that the policy requires such design strategies to be informed by landscape character and the sites landscape context. We also suggest that criteria h. includes a requirement to state maximum building heights.
* Policy DM17 (Stand-alone Renewable Energy): The policy requirement for demonstrating no significant adverse impact upon landscape or townscape character is welcomed. We request reference is also made specifically of views of the SDNP.
* Policy DM19 (Chichester Harbour AONB): We request criterion three also identifies the relationship by way of intervisibility between the AONB and SDNP.
* Policy DM22 (Development in the Countryside): Further to comments on the A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies and S20 (Design), we consider that the wording of this policy could be more proactive by including wording to direct people to 'respect and respond to the National Park landscape, its setting and purposes prior to development design'.
* Policy DM23 (Lighting): The reference to the South Downs International Dark Skies Reserve is welcomed. However, proposals that aren't immediately adjacent to the Reserve may have significant adverse impact, for example due to the site's particular visibility within the landscape or sky glow; we suggest that wording is amended to reflect this.
* Policy DM32 (Green Infrastructure): We suggest that this policy could benefit from specifically citing that green infrastructure should be 'multifunctional'. We also recommend reference to opportunities to make better green infrastructure connections in line with Lawton Principles of 'bigger, better, more joined up', to ensure these spaces can function and therefore deliver benefits.

Conserving and enhancing the region's biodiversity (including green infrastructure).

The SDNPA welcomes the approach taken by CDC to identify green infrastructure and habitats networks as cross boundary issues in paragraph 1.26 of the Plan. The SDNPA looks forward to continuing to work with CDC on green infrastructure matters particularly as your Plan is progressed to pre-submission.

We note that an open space study has been prepared and this could be linked up with other work into a wider green infrastructure approach incorporating the identified strategic wildlife corridors, areas for natural flood management, PROW and connections between the settlements, protected landscapes and the stations, landscape views/settlement gaps and some land management guidelines
for these really important areas. This would be particularly useful to inform development proposals in the A259 corridor.

Policy SD30 - Strategic wildlife corridors

The SDNPA very much welcomes and supports the inclusion into policy of wildlife corridors which traverse the district connecting the two protected landscapes of the Chichester Harbour AONB and the SDNPA.

It is important to note that there is no corresponding policy within South Downs Local Plan, currently at examination, to continue protection of the wildlife corridors within the SDNP. We have concerns that it is unlikely to be sufficient for the corridors just to reach the SDNP boundary. We also note that several of the corridors appear to be quite narrow, especially to the east of the City, and we query whether they are substantial enough to perform the intended function.

We note the detailed evidence outlined in the background paper and the SDNPA would like to work with CDC on the continued development of the strategic wildlife corridors, in particular with regard to their connection points with the National Park and how we can work together on robustly delivering this strategic cross boundary objective.

Ebernoe Common, The Mens, and Singleton & Cocking Special Areas of Conservation

The SDNPA has been working together on technical advice to facilitate sustainable development within proximity Ebernoe Common, The Mens, and Singleton & Cocking Special Areas of Conservation, which are designated for their populations of Bechstein and barbastelle bats. The draft Sussex Bat Special Area of Conservation Planning and Landscape Scale Enhancement Protocol was published in 2018 in the Core Document Library as part of the South Downs Local Plan Examination. The Protocol is based on published data which identifies key impact zones, one of 6.5km and one of 12km, around each of the three SACs. It also sets out avoidance, mitigation, compensation and enhancement measures to inform and be addressed by development proposals. Parts of the Chichester District Local Plan area are within these key impact zones. These zones have been incorporated into policy SD10 of the South Downs Local Plan and the policy has not been modified by the Inspector as a result of the examination in public. The SDNPA would welcome the opportunity for further discuss with CDC and Natural England on this work.
Solent Recreation Mitigation Partnership

Both CDC and the SDNPA are members of the Solent Recreation Mitigation Partnership (SRMP) (also known as Bird Aware Solent) which has provided a strategic mitigation solution to address potential harm to the protected habitat at Chichester Harbour and ensuring compliance with the Habitats Regulations. We note that the SRMP mitigation solution is reflected in Policy DM30 and we look forward to continuing to work with CDC and other members of the SRMP on this matter.
With regard to paragraph 7.185 we suggest reference to the Medmerry Realignment be a new bullet point: 'Medmerry realignment, which is intertidal habitat created in 2013 to compensate for historic losses across the Solent to SSSI and Natura 2000 sites'.
We also suggest the following wording amendment to paragraph 7.187: '...This is particularly relevant to Chichester and Langstone Harbour and Pagham Harbour and the impact of recreational pressure on the birds that use these Special Protection Areas. Any negative impacts that the development may have should will be weighed against the benefits of the proposal. This may include looking at whether the assets are surplus to requirements, if the proposal impacts on a small area or corridor or if a wider need exists for the development and there is no alternative location....'

The delivery of new homes, including affordable homes and pitches for Gypsies,
Travellers and Travelling Showpeople

Policy S4: Meeting Housing Needs
The SDNPA welcomes the uplift to the housing target to address unmet need arising in that part of the SDNP within Chichester District (estimated at 44 dpa at the time the last Statement of Common Ground was agreed in April 2018). The provision of 41 dpa broadly meets this need.
We note that the Objectively Assessed Need is calculated only for the area outside the SDNP using the 'capping' method set out in the Government's standard methodology (the currently adopted target of 435 dwellings per annum plus 40% = 609) - this is helpful as it makes a clear distinction between the assessed need for Chichester District Local Plan area and that for the SDNPA, notwithstanding
the Duty to Cooperate.

Policy S5: Parish Housing Requirements 2016-35
We support identification of parish specific housing requirements providing certainty to local communities. This is the same approach as we have taken in the South Downs Local Plan.

Affordable housing
We note that there is a need for 285 affordable homes per annum (source: HEDNA) which underlines the need for a strong policy which seeks to maximise affordable housing delivery. This high level of need is common to the wider sub-region and is an issue relevant to the wider housing market area.
The SDNPA supports CDC's approach of taking opportunities arising from new residential development to contribute to the supply of affordable housing, to meet local needs in terms of type and tenure (paragraph 4.35). In this respect, it is important that the whole plan viability testing currently being undertaken should fully reflect Planning Practice Guidance on viability, such that as high as possible a percentage of affordable housing is sought. We also support the positive approach to Community Land Trusts (CLTs) as a mechanism for delivering affordable housing (paragraph 4.45). Chichester District Council may also wish to note that SDNPA has, subject to main modifications consultation, received the go-ahead from its Local Plan Inspector for unmodified inclusion of Strategic Policy SD28: Affordable Housing in the South Downs Local Plan. This includes a lower threshold than that advised in Government policy, and also seeks on-site affordable housing from small sites below the 11 threshold stipulated in Government policy.

Policy S7: Meeting Gypsies, Travellers, Travelling Showpeoples' Needs
The SDNPA supports the principle of the policy and whilst noting the significant need arising. It is not clear whether the intention is to allocate sites to meet the need in a separate DPD. Paragraph 4.49
refers to 'the forthcoming DPD' and policy S7 to sites being allocated in a Site Allocation DPD 'where there is a shortfall in provision'. Has this work already been triggered by the scale of need? The policy and associated text could be clearer on this matter.
We would like to highlight that there is limited capacity within the National Park to allocate sites for Gypsies and Travellers through DtC, given significant landscape constraints. We suggest that the coastal authorities and SDNPA continue to work closely with regards addressing the need.

Improving the efficiency of transport networks by enhancing the proportion of travel by sustainable modes and promoting policies which reduce the need to travel
The SDNPA supports in principle Policy S23 (Transport and Accessibility). In particular, we support emphasis on encouragement of use of sustainable modes. We suggest explicit support in the text for improving links into the National Park, particularly by sustainable and active transport modes.
Allocation policies should also should seek to deliver the joining up of existing, and/or improvements to, the network of Public Rights of Way.

SDNPA notes reference in the policy to a coordinated package of improvements to the A27 Chichester Bypass, as well as to a new road from the Fishbourne roundabout. The SDNPA would urge that any such schemes be fully assessed, including streetlighting, for potential adverse impacts on landscape where there is a relationship with the National Park and its setting. Any such impact will
need to be mitigated, and opportunities taken to enhance green infrastructure networks and public rights of way networks. CDC may wish to consider whether the Policy S23 should include additional wording to reflect these principles.

Centurion Way
The SDNPA supports the reference to Centurion Way in paragraph 7.185 in relation to Green Infrastructure & resistance to dissection of green movement corridors. There are opportunities to improve these links, for example, suggest explicit reference to protecting and enhancing the Centurion Way. The reference to Salterns Way is also supported. Centurion Way and Salterns Way are two flagship off-road routes for the SDNP and AONB respectively and do not currently benefit
from safe off-road connection. The SDNPA would strongly support policy to secure this connection and would welcome opportunities to discuss this further and work jointly with CDC on this strategic issue.

With regard to Strategic Policy S14 (Chichester City Transport Strategy) we request that the SDNP is included in the penultimate bullet point as a destination for strategic cycle routes.

Transport evidence
We would highlight that the transport assessment carried out to inform the South Downs Local Plan.
This indicated a potential severe impact on the Petersfield Road / Bepton Road / Rumbolds Hill junction in Midhurst of additional development in the town, in the context of junctions already becoming overcapacity due to background traffic growth, for example, . arising from strategic development in neighbouring planning authorities.
A review of the CDC Transport Study of Strategic Development indicates significant traffic growth arising from Scenario 1 (the preferred strategy). It is not clear from the study how this will impact on the A286 towards Midhurst, which in turn could have a critical impact on junction capacity at Midhurst.
SDNPA may seek further assurance that such potential impacts have been looked at, and appropriate mitigation sought.
Other comments
Page 16 - Local Plan area map: Request clarification whether the Local Plan area includes the following two properties, as not clear from the Local Plan Area map: Stedlands Farm, and The Stable/Little Stedlands, Haslemere GU273DJ
We would like to wish you well in the progression of your Local Plan and would welcome further discussion and joint working on the strategic cross boundary matters raised.

Attachments:

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2493

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Chidham & Hambrook Parish Council

Representation Summary:

No confidence that 500 homes will give infrastructure required.

No mention of upgrading roads serving Chidham and Hambrook

Contradiction as to whether devt in C&H will fund new school rather than replacement school. Unclear where early years/child care places will be accommodated.

Full text:

Characteristics of the Plan Area: a spatial portrait
The term East-West Corridor used with in regard to west of the City of Chichester is ill defined and the use of this term implies the focus of policy is on transport and through movement to the detriment of a more balanced focus on local settlement, existing residential, local countryside and amenity issues.
There is a lack of vision, clarity and coherence of planning policy towards the Bourne Villages, their
character and the surrounding countryside that lies between the South Downs AONB and Chichester
Harbour AONB

Policy S2 Settlement Hierarchy
Object
Chidham & Hambrook, among the other Bourne villages, is characterised as a 'service village' with no definition or explanation of what this means. This term does not reflect the special and unique character of any of these areas, it designates them as no more than utilitarian dormitory communities.
"The largest level of growth is expected in the service villages and settlement hubs, able to accommodate higher levels of growth without adversely impacting the character of the settlement". An increase in growth of housing stock by 55% will undoubtedly negatively impact Chidham & Hambrook.

Policy S3 development Strategy
We believe the rationale for how the number of 500 dwellings for Chidham & Hambrook was arrived at to be wanting and the supplementary evidence to be inconsistent and contradictory. Figures in the 2018 HELAA report suggest that there is available land from achievable sites for 565 new dwellings. This is a completely unrealistic expectation. If these are assessed against the suggested CDC figure of 30- 35 per hectare and 80% developable this gives a total of 360 - 420. The figures seem to be almost entirely based on projections put forward by promoters. Consequently, we were told to put a call out for additional sites. Several of those that have come forward are on sites previously rejected by CDC on the grounds of impact on the AONB, significant access constraints, adverse impact on the landscape and detachment from the settlement boundary.
The Sustainability Appraisal sets out to select numbers in the Potential Distribution Strategies. Assuming a figure of 650 pa, across Chichester District, the predicted numbers for Chidham & Hambrook stay within a narrow range of 500-750, whereas other Parishes fluctuate widely eg Fishbourne 250-1000, Hunston 0-1000.Unlike other parishes, it did not consider a figure of less than 500 for Hambrook.
The Strategic Development Location Assessments seek to assess each district against sustainability criteria. Chidham & Hambrook has been scored with 11 negative and 7 neutral with only 12 positive.
We agree with your judgements with the following additions:
1a in addition to the bat population North of Priors Leaze Lane the Ham Brook is home to water voles.
4b This is a significant constraint. Without adequate public transport and no local facilities or services this will put considerable strain on both the A259 and A27 at both Emsworth and Fishbourne.
5a There is considerable risk of surface water flooding on a number of identified sites.
6a This should be a negative score. To speculate that Southern Rail might increase the service is no justification for assuming a shift to sustainable transport. The hourly service east and west is not adequate for commuters.
9 This should be a negative. There are no local shops apart from a very small and poorly stocked Post Office, which has erratic opening hours, and a charity shop. This doesn't constitute some shops. There are no medical facilities, sports facilities or recreation ground.
10a-12b There are extremely limited employment opportunities in Chidham & Hambrook so difficult to see how any of these would apply.
13a The Local Plan diminishes our rural economy by taking farmland and nurseries for development
13b We have high quality Grade 1 and Grade 2 agricultural land .
We believe these judgements demonstrate that Chidham & Hambrook is less suitable for large scale housing numbers than other areas.


Policy S12 Infrastructure Provision
Infrastructure Delivery Plan
This gives us no confidence that the development of 500 homes in Chidham & Hambrook will give us the infrastructure we need at the time it is required.
Despite the rapid growth in housing numbers over the last five years there has been little infrastructure development. We have no medical centre, local convenience store, employment opportunities, early years or child care provision ,sports or recreational facilities.
Transport: there is no mention of any upgrades to any of the roads or junctions serving the Parish to alleviate congestion and to improve safety. There is no mention of cycling routes and walking provision to provide safe routes. This will be exacerbated by the 1,110+ homes proposed in the Southbourne Parish which will have a coalescent impact on Chidham & Hambrook, particularly Priors Lease Lane and Broad Road.
Education: the suggestion here is that Chidham & Hambrook will be contributing funding to a new school in Southbourne rather than a replacement school in Policy AL10. This represents yet another contradiction. It is unclear where or at which development Early Years and Child Care places would be accommodated.
Health: The nearest provision would be Southbourne

Policy S8 Employment
Object
7.1 Part Two Development Management states " place housing in locations which are accessible by public transport to jobs, shopping, leisure, education and health facilities."
There are limited employment opportunities in Chidham & Hambrook and it appears there is no demand for commercial premises in the area. Industrial units built by Taylor Wimpey on the Lion Park development were not taken up and consequently converted to housing. In the last few years three employment opportunities have closed down to be replaced by housing - two garages which sold, serviced and repaired vehicles, one of which sold petrol and a small stock of essentials, and a plant nursery. This will put an added pressure on traffic as more people drive to their areas of employment west or east using the A259. Public transport is limited and expensive.





Policy S23 Transport /DM8
Object
In Chidham & Hambrook the vast majority (80%) of the proposed new dwellings would be built off Broad Road and some sited on the adjoining Main Road, the A259. There is no provision for the road infrastructure impact of 2250 new homes along this road between Southbourne and Fishbourne. And this will impact the travel survey.
Currently Broad Road has significant safety issues for pedestrians, drivers and cyclists. There is limited visibility due to lack of off-road parking facilities for current residents which has resulted in a number of near accidents. Where it meets the A 259 there is a staggered junction with Cot Lane which, even at present, is difficult to negotiate. The combination of new housing leading to increased traffic in Broad Road and the potential significant volume of increased traffic coming from the 1100+ new dwellings in Southbourne will make this junction dangerous and untenable.
To the North of the Parish there will be increased traffic on the Common Road to Funtington and then the B2178 as a route into the city. Opportunities for any access to housing developments without using Broad Road or Main Road are extremely limited. All other roads in the Parish are essentially lanes, mostly restricted to single lane traffic and could not be used as access to developments.
Pedestrian access in Broad Road is very poor with footways in places too narrow to accommodate buggies, wheel chairs or motorised disabled scooters. As a consequence residents are heavily reliant on cars.

The added volume of traffic will cause significant congestion and decreased air quality. Accessing the A27 at Fishbourne will be further exacerbated by the lack of plans to introduce an additional junction and slip roads onto the A27 between Emsworth and Fishbourne, and for no right turns from the Stockbridge and Whyke roundabouts. The only suggested mitigation is to create a hamburger junction. The increased commuter traffic combined with beach traffic in good weather, will cause gridlock at this roundabout at every junction.
We object to the proposal to build a link road to Birdham which would go straight through a flood plain and a site of environmental significance and would have a negative impact on the views from the coast to the City and SDNP.
Public transport is limited to one bus service along the A259 and an hourly train in either direction from Nutbourne station. The bus is very expensive and the vast majority of passengers are those with bus passes. There is no bus service south to north. The train frequency is too limited as a viable alternative to car travel. We would like to see a more robust policy focussing on public transport links.

We support the creation of an integrated and sustainable transport plan for the District, or at the very least for the area west of Chichester. This plan should draw upon the ongoing work of the ChEmRoute group's investigations and proposals and be coordinated with WSCC with the goal of introducing high quality and separated cycle links between the villages along the A259 and Chichester.

CDC together with WSCC Highways should undertake to provide specialist advice to those Parish Councils chosen to implement proposed strategic housing allocations through Neighbourhood Plans along the A259 in order to assess the impacts of the scale of such allocations on the local highway network. Such advice should be provided in order to aid site selection prior to any master planning of the subsequent development proposal and to help find solutions to potential traffic problems





Policy S6 Affordable Housing
Support
There is a disproportionate number of detached and 4 bed houses currently in our housing stock. We would like to see a commitment for Social Housing in addition to Affordable Housing, which many local people cannot afford to rent or buy. This means many young people leave the area. There is too much flexibility given to developers here in delivering the housing need for the area. They must deliver their "affordable" requirement if sufficient housing to meet local needs is to be provided.

Policy DM 2 Housing Mix
Support
As above we have a high number of 4+ bed and detached homes. Young, low income and single households are being priced out of their neighbourhoods.

Policy DM3 Housing Density
Support
Specialist housing and housing for the elderly will require a lower density as it will be single story. It is essential that there are robust measures that will enable high quality homes to be built to enable elderly people to remain in their community should they need to move into adapted housing more appropriate to their needs. Similarly, life long homes for those with a disability who need specialist housing.

Policy S26 / DM19 Natural Environment
Object
The Spatial Vision and Strategic Objectives 3.6 states that any development west of the city will
" conserve and enhance the local distinctiveness, character and cohesion of existing settlements".
The Sustainability Appraisal states, in relation to Chidham and Hambrook " The scale of the development will completely alter the existing development and there will be significant impact to the existing historic village" These two statements are contradictory .
The magnitude of an additional 500 homes {growth of 55%) will patently alter the local distinctiveness and character of Chidham & Hambrook and risk coalescence with Southbourne. The landscape is characterised by extensive arable land with some nurseries and pasture. Hedges, bushes, orchards and groups of trees contribute to the landscape, as do streams which pass through the Parish. The South Downs National Park is to the North and the AONB of Chichester Harbour to the South.
The CDC Landscape Capability Study reinforces the detrimental effect development will have on the landscape and character in all areas within the Parish
Nutbourne East - Ham Brook Mosaic
Potential development is said to impact on:
valued views, visual corridor for views from Nutbourne Channel towards the SDNP, separation of Southbourne, Hambrook, Nutbourne East, the rural landscape setting, existing pattern of low density settlement.
It will also contribute to the loss of:
Pasture, arable fields, hedgerows, trees, woodland (ancient and semi natural) copses. The area is constrained by its remaining rural character.
Nutbourne West-Nutbourne East Coastal Plain
Potential development will impact on:
valued views, characteristics views to the harbour and the SDNP, views from the AONB and nearby peninsulas: wider separation between Nutbourne West and Nutbourne East, the rural landscape setting,of the AONB, the existing pattern of low density settlement, the well treed landscape setting.
It will also contribute to the loss of:
Pasture, arable fields, hedgerows, trees, woodland copses, characteristic landscape field patterns. The area is constrained by its rural and treed character which contributes to the open setting and character of the AONB.
Upper Chidham Coastal Plain
Potential development will impact on:
Valued views- to the harbour, hills of the SDNP, Bosham Church, setting of Nutbourne Channel and Bosham Harbour, setting of listed buildings, strong rural and tranquil character, views from the SDNP.
Contribute to the loss of:
Arable and paddock fields, hedgerows, trees, tree belts, patches of coastal grassland and wetland, characteristic landscape field patterns.
The area is constrained by its rural and tranquil character, the visually sensitive open large scale fields, its contribution to the open, rural setting of the settlements of Chidham, Nutbourne East and West and their wider separation and its contribution to the wider AONB landscape, including the setting of Nutbourne Channel and Bosham.
Nutbourne East North - Eastern Coastal Plain
Potential development will impact on:
Valued views, rural character, separation between Hambrook and Nutbourne East, semi enclosed and more open character,
Contribute to the loss of: pasture and arable fields, hedgerows, trees, and characteristic field patterns
Nutbourne East Nurseries
Potential development will impact on:
Valued views, characteristic views to the Harbour and SDNP, rural character, separation between Bosham and Nutbourne East, semi enclosed and more open character, the pockets of orchards and small copses.
Contribute to the loss of: pasture and arable fields, hedgerows, trees, and characteristic field patterns

There are clearly significant constraints on the landscape and character if large scale development were to take place in Chidham & Hambrook. The principles in the AONB Management Plan must be rigorously applied to any new developments.

Policy S29, S30, DM 32 Wildlife Corridor
Support
We welcome a specific Policy on wild life corridors located between the SDNP, the Chidham peninsula and Chichester Harbour. The Chidham / East Nutbourne wild life corridor linking important Green Infrastructure, is of special sensitivity.
A variety of species commute or forage between the harbour area and the SDNP including mammals, both deer and bats, of which 10 or more species have been recorded. Badgers, while not normally found on the peninsula, have been seen. Smaller species like Hedgehogs, stoats, weasel, moles, and small prey species, including tawny and barn owls, grey heron and migrant species such as Fieldfare and Redwing use these corridors .
The Ham Brook follows a natural environmental course from the AONB to the SDNP. This natural water course is home to water voles (seen by CDC Wildlife Officer and local environmental volunteers as recently
as January 2019) and the land north of Priors Leaze Lane is a Barn Owl Habitat.There is ancient woodland either side of the railway line next to the trout farm and this is a dormouse habitat too. Development in this area should be constrained by proximity to the wildlife corridor identified by CDC.




AL10/SA10 Chidham & Hambrook
Object
In 2014 at the last iteration of the Neighbourhood Plan there were 850 households in the Parish of Chidham and Hambrook. By the time the new Local Plan is published there will have been an increase in the number of properties in the region of 150 to a total of 1003 in the Parish, an 18% increase. The previous Local Plan had set a target increase of 25 houses. Whilst absorbing this number of properties there have been no changes to the infrastructure and services in the area to support the additional population apart from a charity shop and expansion of the Primary School which is now at capacity and has been for the last year. The new Local Plan requires us to accept a further minimum of 500 properties. This will increase our local housing stock by 50% and will undoubtedly increase the population area by a greater percentage given the age demographic of the area.
6.68 states that" opportunities to relocate and expand the school to two form entry will be sought.". We note that there are similar plans for a relocated and expanded school in Bosham with a site allocated for that purpose, in addition to a new school in Southbourne. Discussions with WSCC have made it clear they would not support the creation of two new schools in such close proximity. It is therefore nonsensical to suggest these two schools could be realised. WSCC data does not support it. Their calculations for schools are based on 210 Primary children for 1000 homes so patently 750 homes would not meet support for two 2 form entry schools. However, the current school is at capacity and cannot on its current site be expanded. If a school project is not forwarded in Chidham & Hambrook the additional children coming from 500 homes would need to travel to Bosham or Southbourne to attend school, along with children from 1100+ homes proposed in Southbourne. There needs to be some clarity and certainty on which of these proposed schools can be achieved and how they would be funded. We find it extraordinary that there is no policy statement on Education.


The Parish Council fully acknowledges that it has a responsibility to contribute to the need for more new housing in the District. However, in view of the above, and having carefully scrutinised the evidence, we believe that 500 homes for Chidham & Hambrook is excessive and is not supported by the documentation. The low provision of amenities, the absence of planned sustainable transport, the proximity of the AONB, the sensitive nature of the landscape and the density of housing proposed, limits the development capacity of the land.
For the reasons given we would like this number significantly reduced by at least 50% in line with Bosham and Fishbourne.

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2499

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Chidham & Hambrook Parish Council

Representation Summary:

Object:
- allocation would increase housing stock by 50%
- school capacity issues and no policy on education
- no evidence to support allocation
- lack of amenities
- lack of public transport
- nature of landscape

Full text:

Characteristics of the Plan Area: a spatial portrait
The term East-West Corridor used with in regard to west of the City of Chichester is ill defined and the use of this term implies the focus of policy is on transport and through movement to the detriment of a more balanced focus on local settlement, existing residential, local countryside and amenity issues.
There is a lack of vision, clarity and coherence of planning policy towards the Bourne Villages, their
character and the surrounding countryside that lies between the South Downs AONB and Chichester
Harbour AONB

Policy S2 Settlement Hierarchy
Object
Chidham & Hambrook, among the other Bourne villages, is characterised as a 'service village' with no definition or explanation of what this means. This term does not reflect the special and unique character of any of these areas, it designates them as no more than utilitarian dormitory communities.
"The largest level of growth is expected in the service villages and settlement hubs, able to accommodate higher levels of growth without adversely impacting the character of the settlement". An increase in growth of housing stock by 55% will undoubtedly negatively impact Chidham & Hambrook.

Policy S3 development Strategy
We believe the rationale for how the number of 500 dwellings for Chidham & Hambrook was arrived at to be wanting and the supplementary evidence to be inconsistent and contradictory. Figures in the 2018 HELAA report suggest that there is available land from achievable sites for 565 new dwellings. This is a completely unrealistic expectation. If these are assessed against the suggested CDC figure of 30- 35 per hectare and 80% developable this gives a total of 360 - 420. The figures seem to be almost entirely based on projections put forward by promoters. Consequently, we were told to put a call out for additional sites. Several of those that have come forward are on sites previously rejected by CDC on the grounds of impact on the AONB, significant access constraints, adverse impact on the landscape and detachment from the settlement boundary.
The Sustainability Appraisal sets out to select numbers in the Potential Distribution Strategies. Assuming a figure of 650 pa, across Chichester District, the predicted numbers for Chidham & Hambrook stay within a narrow range of 500-750, whereas other Parishes fluctuate widely eg Fishbourne 250-1000, Hunston 0-1000.Unlike other parishes, it did not consider a figure of less than 500 for Hambrook.
The Strategic Development Location Assessments seek to assess each district against sustainability criteria. Chidham & Hambrook has been scored with 11 negative and 7 neutral with only 12 positive.
We agree with your judgements with the following additions:
1a in addition to the bat population North of Priors Leaze Lane the Ham Brook is home to water voles.
4b This is a significant constraint. Without adequate public transport and no local facilities or services this will put considerable strain on both the A259 and A27 at both Emsworth and Fishbourne.
5a There is considerable risk of surface water flooding on a number of identified sites.
6a This should be a negative score. To speculate that Southern Rail might increase the service is no justification for assuming a shift to sustainable transport. The hourly service east and west is not adequate for commuters.
9 This should be a negative. There are no local shops apart from a very small and poorly stocked Post Office, which has erratic opening hours, and a charity shop. This doesn't constitute some shops. There are no medical facilities, sports facilities or recreation ground.
10a-12b There are extremely limited employment opportunities in Chidham & Hambrook so difficult to see how any of these would apply.
13a The Local Plan diminishes our rural economy by taking farmland and nurseries for development
13b We have high quality Grade 1 and Grade 2 agricultural land .
We believe these judgements demonstrate that Chidham & Hambrook is less suitable for large scale housing numbers than other areas.


Policy S12 Infrastructure Provision
Infrastructure Delivery Plan
This gives us no confidence that the development of 500 homes in Chidham & Hambrook will give us the infrastructure we need at the time it is required.
Despite the rapid growth in housing numbers over the last five years there has been little infrastructure development. We have no medical centre, local convenience store, employment opportunities, early years or child care provision ,sports or recreational facilities.
Transport: there is no mention of any upgrades to any of the roads or junctions serving the Parish to alleviate congestion and to improve safety. There is no mention of cycling routes and walking provision to provide safe routes. This will be exacerbated by the 1,110+ homes proposed in the Southbourne Parish which will have a coalescent impact on Chidham & Hambrook, particularly Priors Lease Lane and Broad Road.
Education: the suggestion here is that Chidham & Hambrook will be contributing funding to a new school in Southbourne rather than a replacement school in Policy AL10. This represents yet another contradiction. It is unclear where or at which development Early Years and Child Care places would be accommodated.
Health: The nearest provision would be Southbourne

Policy S8 Employment
Object
7.1 Part Two Development Management states " place housing in locations which are accessible by public transport to jobs, shopping, leisure, education and health facilities."
There are limited employment opportunities in Chidham & Hambrook and it appears there is no demand for commercial premises in the area. Industrial units built by Taylor Wimpey on the Lion Park development were not taken up and consequently converted to housing. In the last few years three employment opportunities have closed down to be replaced by housing - two garages which sold, serviced and repaired vehicles, one of which sold petrol and a small stock of essentials, and a plant nursery. This will put an added pressure on traffic as more people drive to their areas of employment west or east using the A259. Public transport is limited and expensive.





Policy S23 Transport /DM8
Object
In Chidham & Hambrook the vast majority (80%) of the proposed new dwellings would be built off Broad Road and some sited on the adjoining Main Road, the A259. There is no provision for the road infrastructure impact of 2250 new homes along this road between Southbourne and Fishbourne. And this will impact the travel survey.
Currently Broad Road has significant safety issues for pedestrians, drivers and cyclists. There is limited visibility due to lack of off-road parking facilities for current residents which has resulted in a number of near accidents. Where it meets the A 259 there is a staggered junction with Cot Lane which, even at present, is difficult to negotiate. The combination of new housing leading to increased traffic in Broad Road and the potential significant volume of increased traffic coming from the 1100+ new dwellings in Southbourne will make this junction dangerous and untenable.
To the North of the Parish there will be increased traffic on the Common Road to Funtington and then the B2178 as a route into the city. Opportunities for any access to housing developments without using Broad Road or Main Road are extremely limited. All other roads in the Parish are essentially lanes, mostly restricted to single lane traffic and could not be used as access to developments.
Pedestrian access in Broad Road is very poor with footways in places too narrow to accommodate buggies, wheel chairs or motorised disabled scooters. As a consequence residents are heavily reliant on cars.

The added volume of traffic will cause significant congestion and decreased air quality. Accessing the A27 at Fishbourne will be further exacerbated by the lack of plans to introduce an additional junction and slip roads onto the A27 between Emsworth and Fishbourne, and for no right turns from the Stockbridge and Whyke roundabouts. The only suggested mitigation is to create a hamburger junction. The increased commuter traffic combined with beach traffic in good weather, will cause gridlock at this roundabout at every junction.
We object to the proposal to build a link road to Birdham which would go straight through a flood plain and a site of environmental significance and would have a negative impact on the views from the coast to the City and SDNP.
Public transport is limited to one bus service along the A259 and an hourly train in either direction from Nutbourne station. The bus is very expensive and the vast majority of passengers are those with bus passes. There is no bus service south to north. The train frequency is too limited as a viable alternative to car travel. We would like to see a more robust policy focussing on public transport links.

We support the creation of an integrated and sustainable transport plan for the District, or at the very least for the area west of Chichester. This plan should draw upon the ongoing work of the ChEmRoute group's investigations and proposals and be coordinated with WSCC with the goal of introducing high quality and separated cycle links between the villages along the A259 and Chichester.

CDC together with WSCC Highways should undertake to provide specialist advice to those Parish Councils chosen to implement proposed strategic housing allocations through Neighbourhood Plans along the A259 in order to assess the impacts of the scale of such allocations on the local highway network. Such advice should be provided in order to aid site selection prior to any master planning of the subsequent development proposal and to help find solutions to potential traffic problems





Policy S6 Affordable Housing
Support
There is a disproportionate number of detached and 4 bed houses currently in our housing stock. We would like to see a commitment for Social Housing in addition to Affordable Housing, which many local people cannot afford to rent or buy. This means many young people leave the area. There is too much flexibility given to developers here in delivering the housing need for the area. They must deliver their "affordable" requirement if sufficient housing to meet local needs is to be provided.

Policy DM 2 Housing Mix
Support
As above we have a high number of 4+ bed and detached homes. Young, low income and single households are being priced out of their neighbourhoods.

Policy DM3 Housing Density
Support
Specialist housing and housing for the elderly will require a lower density as it will be single story. It is essential that there are robust measures that will enable high quality homes to be built to enable elderly people to remain in their community should they need to move into adapted housing more appropriate to their needs. Similarly, life long homes for those with a disability who need specialist housing.

Policy S26 / DM19 Natural Environment
Object
The Spatial Vision and Strategic Objectives 3.6 states that any development west of the city will
" conserve and enhance the local distinctiveness, character and cohesion of existing settlements".
The Sustainability Appraisal states, in relation to Chidham and Hambrook " The scale of the development will completely alter the existing development and there will be significant impact to the existing historic village" These two statements are contradictory .
The magnitude of an additional 500 homes {growth of 55%) will patently alter the local distinctiveness and character of Chidham & Hambrook and risk coalescence with Southbourne. The landscape is characterised by extensive arable land with some nurseries and pasture. Hedges, bushes, orchards and groups of trees contribute to the landscape, as do streams which pass through the Parish. The South Downs National Park is to the North and the AONB of Chichester Harbour to the South.
The CDC Landscape Capability Study reinforces the detrimental effect development will have on the landscape and character in all areas within the Parish
Nutbourne East - Ham Brook Mosaic
Potential development is said to impact on:
valued views, visual corridor for views from Nutbourne Channel towards the SDNP, separation of Southbourne, Hambrook, Nutbourne East, the rural landscape setting, existing pattern of low density settlement.
It will also contribute to the loss of:
Pasture, arable fields, hedgerows, trees, woodland (ancient and semi natural) copses. The area is constrained by its remaining rural character.
Nutbourne West-Nutbourne East Coastal Plain
Potential development will impact on:
valued views, characteristics views to the harbour and the SDNP, views from the AONB and nearby peninsulas: wider separation between Nutbourne West and Nutbourne East, the rural landscape setting,of the AONB, the existing pattern of low density settlement, the well treed landscape setting.
It will also contribute to the loss of:
Pasture, arable fields, hedgerows, trees, woodland copses, characteristic landscape field patterns. The area is constrained by its rural and treed character which contributes to the open setting and character of the AONB.
Upper Chidham Coastal Plain
Potential development will impact on:
Valued views- to the harbour, hills of the SDNP, Bosham Church, setting of Nutbourne Channel and Bosham Harbour, setting of listed buildings, strong rural and tranquil character, views from the SDNP.
Contribute to the loss of:
Arable and paddock fields, hedgerows, trees, tree belts, patches of coastal grassland and wetland, characteristic landscape field patterns.
The area is constrained by its rural and tranquil character, the visually sensitive open large scale fields, its contribution to the open, rural setting of the settlements of Chidham, Nutbourne East and West and their wider separation and its contribution to the wider AONB landscape, including the setting of Nutbourne Channel and Bosham.
Nutbourne East North - Eastern Coastal Plain
Potential development will impact on:
Valued views, rural character, separation between Hambrook and Nutbourne East, semi enclosed and more open character,
Contribute to the loss of: pasture and arable fields, hedgerows, trees, and characteristic field patterns
Nutbourne East Nurseries
Potential development will impact on:
Valued views, characteristic views to the Harbour and SDNP, rural character, separation between Bosham and Nutbourne East, semi enclosed and more open character, the pockets of orchards and small copses.
Contribute to the loss of: pasture and arable fields, hedgerows, trees, and characteristic field patterns

There are clearly significant constraints on the landscape and character if large scale development were to take place in Chidham & Hambrook. The principles in the AONB Management Plan must be rigorously applied to any new developments.

Policy S29, S30, DM 32 Wildlife Corridor
Support
We welcome a specific Policy on wild life corridors located between the SDNP, the Chidham peninsula and Chichester Harbour. The Chidham / East Nutbourne wild life corridor linking important Green Infrastructure, is of special sensitivity.
A variety of species commute or forage between the harbour area and the SDNP including mammals, both deer and bats, of which 10 or more species have been recorded. Badgers, while not normally found on the peninsula, have been seen. Smaller species like Hedgehogs, stoats, weasel, moles, and small prey species, including tawny and barn owls, grey heron and migrant species such as Fieldfare and Redwing use these corridors .
The Ham Brook follows a natural environmental course from the AONB to the SDNP. This natural water course is home to water voles (seen by CDC Wildlife Officer and local environmental volunteers as recently
as January 2019) and the land north of Priors Leaze Lane is a Barn Owl Habitat.There is ancient woodland either side of the railway line next to the trout farm and this is a dormouse habitat too. Development in this area should be constrained by proximity to the wildlife corridor identified by CDC.




AL10/SA10 Chidham & Hambrook
Object
In 2014 at the last iteration of the Neighbourhood Plan there were 850 households in the Parish of Chidham and Hambrook. By the time the new Local Plan is published there will have been an increase in the number of properties in the region of 150 to a total of 1003 in the Parish, an 18% increase. The previous Local Plan had set a target increase of 25 houses. Whilst absorbing this number of properties there have been no changes to the infrastructure and services in the area to support the additional population apart from a charity shop and expansion of the Primary School which is now at capacity and has been for the last year. The new Local Plan requires us to accept a further minimum of 500 properties. This will increase our local housing stock by 50% and will undoubtedly increase the population area by a greater percentage given the age demographic of the area.
6.68 states that" opportunities to relocate and expand the school to two form entry will be sought.". We note that there are similar plans for a relocated and expanded school in Bosham with a site allocated for that purpose, in addition to a new school in Southbourne. Discussions with WSCC have made it clear they would not support the creation of two new schools in such close proximity. It is therefore nonsensical to suggest these two schools could be realised. WSCC data does not support it. Their calculations for schools are based on 210 Primary children for 1000 homes so patently 750 homes would not meet support for two 2 form entry schools. However, the current school is at capacity and cannot on its current site be expanded. If a school project is not forwarded in Chidham & Hambrook the additional children coming from 500 homes would need to travel to Bosham or Southbourne to attend school, along with children from 1100+ homes proposed in Southbourne. There needs to be some clarity and certainty on which of these proposed schools can be achieved and how they would be funded. We find it extraordinary that there is no policy statement on Education.


The Parish Council fully acknowledges that it has a responsibility to contribute to the need for more new housing in the District. However, in view of the above, and having carefully scrutinised the evidence, we believe that 500 homes for Chidham & Hambrook is excessive and is not supported by the documentation. The low provision of amenities, the absence of planned sustainable transport, the proximity of the AONB, the sensitive nature of the landscape and the density of housing proposed, limits the development capacity of the land.
For the reasons given we would like this number significantly reduced by at least 50% in line with Bosham and Fishbourne.

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2559

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Chichester Harbour Trust

Representation Summary:

As for policy AL9 at Fishbourne, it is difficult to assess the potential impact of this proposal on Chichester Harbour AONB.

We urge that the provision of 500 houses at Chidham and Hambrook should not lead to the erosion of the setting of the AONB, and should not lead to coalescence with neighbouring settlements, particularly Southbourne to the West.

Full text:

We object to the allocation site at Highgrove Farm, Bosham with approximately 13 ha of open countryside allocated to a minimum of 250 houses.

This development in the countryside directly conflicts with policy S24 Countryside and Policy S26 the Natural Environment; which clearly states there should be no adverse impact on the openness of views in and around the coast, designated environmental areas (i.e. the AONB) and the setting of the South Downs National Park. The proposed development at Highgrove Farm directly contradicts these policies.

We strongly believe that this development would cause irretrievable harm to the landscape character, setting and context of Chichester Harbour AONB and the intervisibility with the South Downs National Park. We feel that the measures proposed within the policy would not be able to sufficiently mitigate for the damage this development would cause.

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2666

Received: 04/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Mike Dicker

Representation Summary:

Makes no provision for the road infrastructure impact of a further 500 dwellings onto the A259 and A27.

See attached for full detail.

Full text:

Full detailed submission for the Local Plan and supporting evidence is attached.

The representations attached to this submission reflect a high level summary of the detailed submission and do not contain the full level of detail received.

High level comments received:

a. The transport study conducted by Peter Brett Associates (PBA) is not fit for purpose and needs to be rewritten. The scope set for PBA is far too constraining and counters the democratic process agreed by the council to seek alternative routes.

b. Many of the documents are inconsistent and in their current form smack of inconsistency and bias. Reasons for excluding some strategic sites are not consistently used for other sites.

c. Many of the evidence documents are not present or are not complete for this consultation. These will need to be re consulted when they are complete.

d. CDC should not be accepting the unmet housing need from the South Downs National Park (SDNP). They should also be going back to government to insist that until certainty is provided on the A27 this area can not accommodate future housing and or employment space.

e. The proposed link road was resoundly rejected last time it was proposed by Highways England. CDC need to respect the voices that rejected what is option 2 by stealth. Particularly as the PBA report states that the building of the link road will offer other "strategic options". This will not be tolerated locally.

Attachments:

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2781

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Sussex Wildlife Trust

Representation Summary:

SWT is concerned about the number of dwelling allocated for this parish, given its current size and proximity to designated sites. We note that unlike for many other strategic allocation policies, there is no recognition in the supporting text of the presence of a Local Wildlife Site within the parish, this should be amended. We also question why recreation disturbance is not noted as an adverse impact on the nearby SPA to be avoided. An allocation of this size will likely result in an increase in visitors to the Harbour.

Full text:

See attachment

Attachments:

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3016

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Sunley Estates Ltd

Agent: Neame Sutton Limited

Representation Summary:

Support proposed 500 dwellings and promote land to meet requirement. If further sites are available they should be allocated.

Concern over use of NP to allocate sites.

Full text:

See attachment

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3093

Received: 06/02/2019

Respondent: Chichester Harbour Conservancy

Representation Summary:

Object on the following grounds:
* Major development on the fringe of the AONB.
* Affect buffer zone outside the AONB.
* Breach of current and emerging AONB Management Plan
* SSSI Interest Impact Risk Zone, which affects the SAC, SPA and Ramsar designations.
* Wildlife
* Views
* Highest quality agricultural land
* Urbanisation
* Light, air, noise, and soil pollution.
* Wastewater
* Inadequate mitigation

Full text:

See attachment

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3188

Received: 04/02/2019

Respondent: Mrs Sarah Sharp

Representation Summary:

In order to facilitiate safe cycling and walking a continuous, direct, safe and comfortable path must be provided and protected from the traffic; there should be links off the route linking the communities.

Plan should include provision of housing for younger people with shared communal areas to make living in shared communities an attractive and affordable proposition to attract more young people to stay in the area.

Full text:

See attachment

Attachments:

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3262

Received: 30/01/2019

Respondent: Mr & Mrs R Hirlehey

Number of people: 2

Agent: Bedford & Upton

Representation Summary:

We support both of these policies and the number of houses which they propose should be allocated.
(Site submission attached)

We are, however, concerned that there may be a conflict between the interests of the two Parishes when considering the possible allocation of this land on account of the land for development being located in the Parish of Southboure while in reality in forms part of the settlement of Hambrook from which it is entered.

Full text:

See attachment

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3347

Received: 05/02/2019

Respondent: CEG

Agent: Nexus Planning Ltd

Representation Summary:

Question deliverability of allocation through NP process

Full text:

See attachment

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3367

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Landlink Estates Ltd

Agent: Intelligent Land

Representation Summary:

For the reasons set out in representations to draft Policies S2 and S3, the allocation in Chidham and Hambrook Parish should be more appropriate to its size, services and facilities. As such the allocation should be reduced to 125, with the remaining 375 allocated to Bosham/Broadbridge, as set out in representations to draft Policy AL7.

Full text:

See attachment

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3422

Received: 06/02/2019

Respondent: Seaward Properties Ltd

Agent: Genesis Town Planning

Representation Summary:

Promoted site land at Cox's Barn Farm, Broad Road, Hambrook.

We support the principle of having more than one site to meet the strategic allocation of 500 dwellings. Spreading development over 2 or more sites will assist short term housing delivery and minimise the long lead in times that the very large strategic sites are suffering in the current Key Policies Local Plan.

Full text:

See attachment

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3533

Received: 06/02/2019

Respondent: Chidham Sustainability Network

Representation Summary:

The local plan review has failed to make a proper distribution of housing in the Parish. The so called comprehensive selection process undertaken by the planners in their strategic site allocation exercise and the subsequent approval by CDC is found to be wanting as it is based on developers estimates which have not followed the density benchmarks as per policy DM3 and has also not been modified for locations adjacent to sensitive locations.

Full text:

I strongly object to the Chichester Local Plan Review 2035 as it currently stands in relation the Chidham and Hambrook on the following grounds:

1 The local plan promote the coalescence off settlements between Chichester and Emsworth which will adversely impact the special character of the villages.

2 The local plan review has failed to make a proper distribution of housing in the Parish. The so called comprehensive selection process undertaken by the planners in their strategic site allocation exercise and the subsequent approval by CDC is found to be wanting as it is based on developers estimates which have not followed the density benchmarks as per policy DM3 and has also not been modified for locations adjacent to sensitive locations. See Parish Councils response to policy S2 settlement hierarchy.

3 The infrastructure Deliver plan which supports the local plan is not fit for purpose. It does not adequately address the transportation, educational,medical and general amenity needs and timing thereof that will arise in a community which is expected to grow by 50% in the period.

4 The spatial Vision and Strategic Objectives (section 3.6 local plan) and the sustainability appraisal in relation to Chidham and `ham brook are contradictory. (see Parish Council response policy S26/DM19 natural environment). If the latter prevails we will see the loss of key landscape features, the loss of high quality farmland, a further deterioration of water quality and further disruption to important internal migratory birds along the existing natural corridors.

500 houses for Chidham and Hambrook is excessive and is not supported by the documentation and the numbers should be significantly reduced.