Policy AL4: Land at Westhampnett/North East Chichester

Showing comments and forms 1 to 28 of 28

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 226

Received: 19/01/2019

Respondent: Iain Burgess

Representation Summary:

I am supportive of the removal of the large field to the West of Madgwick Lane and East of the River Lavant from the Existing Strategic Site Allocation. The preservation of this strategic gap between Chichester and Westhampnett and Goodwood Airfield/Motor Circuit is important for a number of reasons:

1. It maintains the individual identity of each of the three areas
2. It maintains the view of the cathedral spire
3. It provides natural flood resilience for the River Lavant, given the housing proposed to the West of the Strategic Site
4. It avoids building houses too close to noise

Full text:

I am supportive of the removal of the large field to the West of Madgwick Lane and East of the River Lavant from the Existing Strategic Site Allocation. The preservation of this strategic gap between Chichester and Westhampnett and Goodwood Airfield/Motor Circuit is important for a number of reasons:

1. It maintains the individual identity of each of the three component areas
2. It maintains the view of the cathedral spire
3. It provides natural flood resilience for the River Lavant, given the housing proposed to the West of the Strategic Site
4. It avoids building houses too close to the increased noise generated at times from Goodwood Airfield/Motor Circuit.

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 248

Received: 29/01/2019

Respondent: Sustrans

Representation Summary:

Agree with Point 13.

Full text:

Agree with Point 13.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 314

Received: 21/01/2019

Respondent: Mr Ken Burgess

Representation Summary:

As I live just outside of the 400 metre Goodwood Circuit Buffer, I am pleased that you agree with the MAS study that no development should be allowed within this boundary. I appreciate the Circuit from a personal point of view and also the fact that it benefits the local area and businesses and would not wish that any development should place restrictions on the Circuit. The removal of land from the existing allocation in Policy AL4 hopefully ensures the future of the Circuit.

Full text:

Policies AL4 and S16.
As I live just outside of the 400 metre Goodwood Circuit Buffer, I am pleased that you agree with the MAS study that no development should be allowed within this boundary. I appreciate the Circuit from a personal point of view and also the fact that it benefits the local area and businesses and would not wish that any development should place restrictions on the Circuit. The removal of land from the existing allocation in Policy AL4 hopefully ensures the future of the Circuit.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 335

Received: 23/01/2019

Respondent: Mr Paul Sansby

Representation Summary:

Part of this allocation has become directly linked to the Greylingwell Development. Has the provision of services and road access been carefully considered?

Full text:

Part of this allocation has become directly linked to the Greylingwell Development. Has the provision of services and road access been carefully considered?

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 848

Received: 02/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Ben Kirk

Representation Summary:

The site whilst suitable for some development as outlined has potential for significant landscape impact as it is open to views from the higher ground to the north within the National Park contrary to national policy and DEFRA guidance. This is a key constraint of the site and commercial development here, whilst not sensitive to the noise buffer, has potential for significant visual and landscape impact and should not be considered in any amendments to the plan

Full text:

The site whilst suitable for some development as outlined has potential for significant landscape impact as it is open to views from the higher ground to the north within the National Park contrary to national policy and DEFRA guidance. This is a key constraint of the site and commercial development here, whilst not sensitive to the noise buffer, has potential for significant visual and landscape impact and should not be considered in any amendments to the plan

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 890

Received: 03/02/2019

Respondent: Mr David Young

Representation Summary:

I support removal of the large field to the West of Madgwick Lane and East of the River Lavant from the Existing Strategic Site Allocation. Many of the reasons have been referred to in the particulars:
- Maintaining the integrity of the Lavant floodplain
- Avoids building houses too near the Goodwood Motor Circuit/Aerodrome
In addition it is important that the semi-rural environment should be retained to some extent -there is a need for some new development but it Westhampnett, and Lavant must maintain their identity and not become part of a Chichester suburban sprawl

Full text:

I support removal of the large field to the West of Madgwick Lane and East of the River Lavant from the Existing Strategic Site Allocation. Many of the reasons have been referred to in the particulars:
- Maintaining the integrity of the Lavant floodplain
- Avoids building houses too near the Goodwood Motor Circuit/Aerodrome
In addition it is important that the semi-rural environment should be retained to some extent -there is a need for some new development but it Westhampnett, and Lavant must maintain their identity and not become part of a Chichester suburban sprawl

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1045

Received: 04/02/2019

Respondent: Mrs Clare Gordon-Pullar

Representation Summary:

This area has not been considered for employment space. It is close to other businesses including Rolls Royce and being close to the SDNP will open up employment opportunities for the rural community.
Using it for employment overcomes the noise issues and it has good access to the A27.
It has limited environmental impact and would not affect views of the Cathedral or the SNDP.

Full text:

This area has not been considered for employment space. It is close to other businesses including Rolls Royce and being close to the SDNP will open up employment opportunities for the rural community.
Using it for employment overcomes the noise issues and it has good access to the A27.
It has limited environmental impact and would not affect views of the Cathedral or the SNDP.

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1140

Received: 25/01/2019

Respondent: British Horse Society

Representation Summary:

Support and welcome the requirement for opportunities for the provision of green infrastructure with links to the wider countryside to be explored. Creating new routes and links is especially important on the Coastal Plain, where an off-road multi-use path network would be of great benefit to all NMUs.

Full text:

The British Horse Society (BHS) is the UK's largest equine charity and equestrian membership organisation and the governing body for recreational riding. Its charitable objects include the promotion of equestrian safety, particularly on roads, and equestrian access to bridleways and other off-road multi-use routes for the public benefit. On behalf of The Society I would like to make the following comments:

Chichester Local Plan Review 2016-2035 Preferred Approach

The Society's priority when commenting on this document is to try and ensure that the policies and wording in the text include commitments to support and protect vulnerable road user groups, including equestrians (West Sussex Transport Plan, page 32, para 1.4.5), from the dangers they face on local roads due to the inevitable increase in traffic on these roads brought about by planned housing development.

The Plan area covered is home to a large number of equestrians, who bring significant economic benefits, especially to rural communities, but unless they have access to a safe network of bridleways, byways, and other off-road informal recreational routes which they can use daily, the dangers to horse riders will increase, and the industry will struggle to survive.

Policy S18: Integrated Coastal Zone Management for the Manhood Peninsula (page 68)
Equestrians on the Manhood Peninsula feel increasingly unsafe on the local roads they have always used, where the speed and volume of vehicles has grown considerably, and will do so even more as a result of the proposed housing development. There are now more than 500 horses kept in the area (Manhood Riding Club count) in private stables, livery yards, and the local Riding School (at which the Chichester Group of Riding for the Disabled is based).

We would, therefore, absolutely support objective 5 of this Policy "Improve infrastructure to support sustainable modes of transport, especially cycle ways, bridleways and footpaths, including the National Coastal Footpath ".

We would suggest the best way to do this is to ensure that at least one multi-use route (bridleway) is provided through, or around the fringe of developments, which can also serve as a green corridor for leisure and recreation and, and benefit health and well-being, wildlife and biodiversity. These routes can form the basis of a safe non-motorised user (NMU) network and link with existing public rights of way (prow) where possible.

Policy S20: Design (page 74)
Bullet point 5 - wording is supported "incorporates and/or links to high quality Green Infrastructure and landscaping to enhance biodiversity and meet recreational needs, including public rights of way."
However, it is important as mentioned above that this incudes 'multi-use' public rights of way for the benefit of all.

Transport Infrastructure
Para 5.15 - very good to see "bridleways" included in this para.
Para 5.16 - The wording "There is an extensive public rights of way network across the plan area... is misleading. The wording implies that this prow network is available to all users, whereas on the Coastal Plain the prow network consists almost entirely of footpaths, which are not available for use by cyclists and equestrians. Upgrading appropriate/suitable prow to bridleways would contribute to the West Sussex Transport Plan (2011-2026) aim of "improving safety for all road users", mentioned in para 5.18.

Policy S23: Transport and Accessibility
Bullet point 8 - Our view is that the objective "improving safety for all road users", should be included in the actual Policy wording, not just in the accompanying text. However, it is good to see 'public rights of way' included, which need to be multi-use bringing safety benefits for all vulnerable road users.

Countryside and Countryside Gaps (page 82)
Para 5.37 - Absolutely agree the plan area's countryside is an important and diminishing resource, and the Council's aim to protect the countryside from the urbanising impacts of development is welcomed. For existing and future residents, the opportunity to enjoy 'informal recreation' (walking, cycling, horse riding) in the countryside is important for leisure, health, and well-being. The Council needs to take a very active role in ensuring that any development provides benefits, most likely in the way of safe, off-road multi-use routes(green links), and the mention of this in para 5.40 is welcomed.

Policy S32: Design Strategies for Strategic and Major Development Sites (page 92/93)
The references in Point b, "movement and access arrangements and Green Infrastructure provision", in Point e, "community leisure and recreation facilities as appropriate", and Point g, "contain a Green Infrastructure framework to ensure that public and private open space standards are met, relate well to each other and to existing areas and that the new spaces are safe, convenient, accessible and functional" are welcomed.
However, it is important that leisure and recreational routes, and new prow connect to the wider countryside for public benefit, and are not just contained within a development. There are many examples in the county where new routes have been created across or on the fringe of a development, which link to a wider network of recreational routes. The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), para 98, states "Planning policies and decisions should protect and enhance public rights of way and access, including taking opportunities to provide better facilities for users, for example by adding links to existing rights of way networks"

Policy AL1: Land West of Chichester (page 96)
Point 4 - whilst welcoming the provision of "open space and green infrastructure", this development provides an excellent opportunity to improve links to the wider countryside, in particular to BW 270 and Park Lane (which should be formally dedicated as a prow).
Point 10 - An "appropriate landscaping buffer", is also an excellent opportunity to provide a multi-use prow (bridleway), for the safety and enjoyment of all vulnerable road users, which as a 'green corridor, would also contribute to green infrastructure.
We would also request that when looking at 'key landscaping' of the Centurian Way (CW), the issue of upgrading this to a multi-user path where possible, to include equestrians is considered, so that they can also benefit from a safe and secure off-road environment. The CW is the only disused railway line in the county that is not available for use by all NMUs. The Worth Way and Downs Link are fully multi-use, and are highly valued and well used.

Policy AL2: Land at Shopwyke (Oving Parish) (page 99/100)
Point 9 - Despite repeated requests for the proposed bridge connection across the A27 at Coach Road (a route used by all NMUs until it was severed when the A27 was realigned) to also be made available for equestrian use, it would appear from the Policy wording that horse riders continue to be excluded, despite the large numbers of horses kept in the Oving area.

At present, riders have to box their horses over the A27 to access the safe network of bridleways and riding routes in the National Park, which is a situation contrary to the aims and objectives set out in this Plan. In order to gain maximum benefit from bridge infrastructure, it should be made available for as many users as possible.

Policies AL3 to AL14
All of these Policies require opportunities for the provision of green infrastructure with links to the wider countryside to be explored, and these are welcomed and supported. Creating new routes and links is especially important on the Coastal Plain, where an off-road multi-use path network would be of great benefit to all NMUs.

The West Sussex Rights of Way Management Plan 2018-2028 has Objectives (page 3) which include:
2. Improve path links to provide circular routes and links between communities.
3. Improve the PRoW network to create safe routes for both leisure and utility journeys, by minimising the need to use and cross busy roads.
4. Provide a PRoW network that enables appropriate access with minimal barriers for as many people as possible.
5. Promote countryside access to all sections of the community enabling people to confidently and responsibly use and enjoy the countryside.

The Plan also states in Improvement schemes (page 13), that "A starting point for new schemes will be to consider who could benefit from a new route, such as walkers, cyclists, horse riders and the disabled, and be as inclusive as possible, often the aim will be to achieve at least bridleway status.

Policy DM32 Green Infrastructure (page 199)
It is disappointing that the wording (on page 197/198) omits to mention that prow (footpaths, bridleways, byways), are defined by Natural England, and also recognised nationally, as multifunctional 'green corridors', and are therefore part of GI. Providing a multi-use (walker, cyclist, equestrian) prow or recreational route around the periphery would comply with NPPF, para 98, as mentioned above.
It is good to see public rights of way, and bridleways mentioned in Point 4 of the Policy, although the wording "do not lead to the dissection of the linear network" appears to be rather negative, much better to tell someone what they should do "The proposals protect, and contribute to the improvement of ........"

Policy DM34: Open Space, Sport and Recreation .... (page 204)
We support the aim to "seek to retain, enhance, improve access and increase the quantity and quality of....rights of way including improvement of links to them." This will be of great benefit to all NMUs.

Point 1 - Excellent to see requirement for development to contribute to new links to the existing rights of way network, which should be multi-use wherever possible.
Also support the aim to secure on-site provision secured via S106 agreements to provide (amongst other things) links to the existing rights of way network to meet any identified shortfalls in the local area, and would request in line with the WS RoW Management Plan that these links will be "as inclusive as possible, often the aim will be to achieve at least bridleway status."

Attachments:

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1279

Received: 06/02/2019

Respondent: HMPC Ltd

Representation Summary:

Land removed from further development pressure a positive use of the land should be defined through this plan. It has a distinct open space use, to protect views of the cathedral and setting of the city and also to provide a suitable landscape transition between the city and National Park.

The role of the land removed should be confirmed as performing the role of open space and green infrastructure, including a linear greenspace with public access along the Lavant Valley.

Full text:

In considering development within the East -West corridor and its potential impacts on the Estate, the strategic allocation at Westhampnett/northeast Chichester is a key consideration. The removal of land from the allocation to limit development to that already granted planning permission is welcomed and supported. To protect the land removed from further development pressure a positive use of the land should be defined through this plan. It has a distinct open space use, to protect views of the cathedral and setting of the city and also to provide a suitable landscape transition between the city and National Park. Much of the land removed from the allocation comprises floodplain and falls within the 400m noise buffer to Goodwood Circuit and Aerodrome. The role of the land removed should be confirmed as performing the role of open space and green infrastructure, including a linear greenspace with public access along the Lavant Valley. It is helpful if Policy AL4 cross references more specifically to the provisions of Policies S15 and S16 in terms of the open space protecting the Goodwood Circuit and Airfield.
Policy AL4: Land at Westhampnett/North East Chichester
Land to the west of Westhampnett and north-east of Chichester city is allocated for mixed development, comprising:
1. 500 homes;
2. Community facilities;
3. Open space and green infrastructure, including an area of linear greenspace (as defined on the proposals map) which will include suitable woodland planting and landscape treatment to provide public access along the Lavant Valley and to the National Park, and provide a green setting for the city alongside the national park border.
Taking into account the site-specific requirements, proposals for the site should:
4. Development will be directed towards the settlement of Westhampnett, to the south of Madgwick Lane, and to the eastern edge of Chichester, but away from the floodplain of the River Lavant, and the Goodwood Motor Circuit and Aerodrome (Policy S16);
5. Development should be well integrated with the village of Westhampnett and neighbouring residential areas in Chichester City and should be planned to provide good access to existing facilities and not to harm the setting of the historic city, or the character, setting and continued operation of the Goodwood Airfield and Motor Circuit ;
6. Development should provide or contribute to improved local community facilities;
7. Provision should be made for green links to the South Downs National Park and Chichester City. Opportunities should be explored for provision of integrated green infrastructure in conjunction with the other strategic sites to the east of the city, including Tangmere;
8. Development should be designed with special regard to the landscape sensitivity of the site (especially to views towards and from within the South Downs National Park), and to reduce the impact of noise associated with the Goodwood Motor Circuit/Aerodrome. Major new structural planting will be required to soften the impact of development on views from the north and around the Motor Circuit;
9. Development should be designed with special regard to the Graylingwell Hospital Conservation Area, the buildings of the former 'pauper lunatic asylum' and the Grade II registered park and garden in which they sit, and to other listed buildings in the vicinity of the site and their settings. Important views of Chichester Cathedral spire from the area should be protected;
10. Adoption of a comprehensive approach to flood risk management on the site, including consideration of surface water drainage as part of a masterplan process; this shall not be limited to 'hard engineering solutions', but promote 'soft, green' solutions that contribute positively to the area's Natural Capital
11. Road access to the site will be determined as part of the masterplan process, depending on the location(s) for proposed development. Development will be required to provide or fund mitigation for potential off-site traffic impacts through a package of measures in conformity with the Chichester City Transport Strategy (see Policy S14);
12. Provision should be made for regular bus services linking the site with Chichester city centre, and new and improved cycle and pedestrian routes linking the site with Chichester City, the South Downs National Park and other strategic developments to the east of Chichester City including Tangmere. This could include exploring the potential for a bus only route linking the development with the Graylingwell area; and
13. Development in the Airfield Flight Safety Zone, which should be referenced in any planning application, should be strictly controlled and limited to that which can be justified as causing no hazard to the operational needs of the Airfield.
Development will be dependent on the provision of infrastructure for adequate wastewater conveyance and treatment to meet strict environmental standards.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1342

Received: 06/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Seamus Meyer

Representation Summary:

The land around the motor racing circuit was previously allocated as a strategic site for employment. Why has this been changed and replaced with a 'Buffer Zone'? What does this buffer zone mean? I think this land would be very suitable for additional employment use.

Full text:

The land around the motor racing circuit was previously allocated as a strategic site for employment. Why has this been changed and replaced with a 'Buffer Zone'? What does this buffer zone mean? I think this land would be very suitable for additional employment use.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1598

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Robert Probee

Representation Summary:

I consider this area suitable for employment space.

Full text:

I consider this area suitable for employment space.

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1714

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Dominic Stratton

Representation Summary:

Errors in statements identified

6.35 bullet 2. There can not be any effect on views from within the SDNP to the North.

"The site lies within 1km of the National Park boundary"
This is irrelevant as the same distance factor is not being considered with proximity to the AONB.

"and is open to views from Goodwood"
views from aerodrome or motor circuit irrelevant in planning terms

"and The Trundle to the north"
The justification here is therefore flawed

6.35 bullet 4. "and protects important views of Chichester Cathedral spire". Views from the proposed site are very limited of the cathedral.

Full text:

6.35 bullet 2. There are a number of considerations here. The statement is "Landscape sensitivity, particularly in terms of views towards and from within the SouthDowns National Park to the north"
There is an error in this sentence as there can not be any effect on views from within the SDNP to the North.

"The site lies within 1km of the National Park boundary"
This is irrelevant as the same distance factor is not being considered with proximity to the AONB where the impact is the same if not greater and he proximity is less than 100 metres.

"and is open to views from Goodwood"
views from an aerodrome or motor circuit is irrelevant in planning terms and this is not a factor in declining a suitable strategic site

"and The Trundle to the north"
The justification here is therefore flawed

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1718

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Mrs Claire Stratton

Representation Summary:

Errors in statements identified

6.35 bullet 2. There can not be any effect on views from within the SDNP to the North.

"The site lies within 1km of the National Park boundary"
This is irrelevant as the same distance factor is not being considered with proximity to the AONB.

"and is open to views from Goodwood"
views from aerodrome or motor circuit irrelevant in planning terms

"and The Trundle to the north"
The justification here is therefore flawed

6.35 bullet 4. "and protects important views of Chichester Cathedral spire". Views from the proposed site are very limited of the cathedral.

Full text:

6.35 bullet 2. There are a number of considerations here. The statement is "Landscape sensitivity, particularly in terms of views towards and from within the SouthDowns National Park to the north"
There is an error in this sentence as there can not be any effect on views from within the SDNP to the North.

"The site lies within 1km of the National Park boundary"
This is irrelevant as the same distance factor is not being considered with proximity to the AONB where the impact is the same if not greater and he proximity is less than 100 metres.

"and is open to views from Goodwood"
views from an aerodrome or motor circuit is irrelevant in planning terms and this is not a factor in declining a suitable strategic site

"and The Trundle to the north"
The justification here is therefore flawed

54. 6.35 bullet 4. "and protects important views of Chichester Cathedral spire". The views from the proposed site are very limited of the cathedral. In terms of the land gradient the building is unlikely to affect the views of the cathedral and line of site needs to apply. This is not a reason for rejection of this site that can be developed for employment space. Unless this is adequately addressed in future iterations of the plan I will wish to raise this with the examiner at the appropriate juncture.

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1721

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Dominic Stratton

Representation Summary:

This site has not been considered for employment space. This should be the preferred site for employment space

Full text:

This site has not been considered for employment space. It should be the preferred site for employment space removing that proposed in the plan for the SW of Chichester.
The benefits of doing so are as follows:
a. Proximity to other business in the area and particularly Rolls Royce. Co location of business in specialised areas is a key benefit for supply chain and mentoring delivering the support mechanism for this high tech business.
b. Benefit of opening up employment opportunities for the rural community within the SDNP without having to cross Chichester itself to reach employment opportunities.
c. Limited flood plain impact as the majority of this site is outwith level 3 floodplain.
d. Overcomes the noise sensitive impact of the race circuit and aerodrome.
e. Outside the safe air corridor
f. Good access to the A27 with no requirement for major new junctions or relief roads that are expensive and unaffordable.

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 1722

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Mrs Claire Stratton

Representation Summary:

This site has not been considered for employment space. It should be the preferred site for employment space removing that proposed in the plan for the SW of Chichester.

Full text:

This site has not been considered for employment space. It should be the preferred site for employment space removing that proposed in the plan for the SW of Chichester.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2084

Received: 15/02/2019

Respondent: West Sussex County Council

Representation Summary:

Minerals and waste:
Reference should be made to minerals safeguarding, for consistency with other allocations, as within the sharp sand and gravel safeguarding area.

Full text:

West Sussex County Council Officer Level Response
Introduction
The Chichester Local Plan Review Preferred Approach sets out how the future development in the District will be shaped, excluding the area within the South Downs National Park, up to 2035. It includes the overall development strategy as well as relevant strategic policies to meet the future needs of the area and development management policies to help guide development over the plan period. The Local Plan helps to:
* choose where the development goes;
* protect the character and beauty of the area;
* provide job and housing opportunities so that children can continue to work and live locally;
* support and help to boost the local economy;
* help residents to maintain healthy and active lifestyles; and,
* make sure that there is adequate services, travel options and community facilities.

The Chichester Local Plan was adopted in July 2015. At that time, the Local Plan was approved, but the Government Inspector said that it had to be reviewed again within five years, to make sure that sufficient housing was planned to meet the needs of the area.

The first part of the review process was carried out in June 2017 with an Issues and Options consultation, in which comments were invited regarding the overall development strategy and possible development locations. The Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach is the second stage of the process. It sets out the proposed development strategy and policies for the area to meet future needs.


West Sussex County Council Officer Level Comments
This note sets out West Sussex County Council's (WSCC) officer response to the consultation on the draft Chichester Local Plan Review Preferred Approach. It highlights key issues and suggested changes to which Chichester District Council (CDC) is requested to give consideration. We will continue to work with CDC in preparation of the Local Plan Review and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan regarding WSCC service requirements in order to mitigate planned development.


Minerals and Waste
A steady and adequate supply of minerals and the achievement of sustainable waste management can help to achieve a District or Borough Council's goals in relation to the economy, housing, transport, communications, strategic infrastructure and the environment. Therefore, District and Borough Local Plans should recognise the importance of minerals and waste issues as relevant to the scope of their overall strategies.

We welcome the reference to the adopted Minerals and Waste Local Plans and safeguarding in the document and the requirements in policies where a site is located within a minerals safeguarding area, or near to a safeguarded waste site. There are some missing references to safeguarding of minerals and waste sites for some of the proposed allocations, set out below and request that these references are added. It is also requested that 'Joint' is added into the references for the Joint Minerals Local Plan through the document.

Policy W23 of the Waste Local Plan applies to all Districts & Boroughs, regarding waste management within development and should be referenced in the Chichester Local Plan Review.

AL3 East of Chichester
The site is to the north of the Fuel Depot site allocation in the Waste Local Plan (Policy W10) for a built waste facility as part of a comprehensive redevelopment of the site (including complimentary non-waste uses). The East of Chichester allocation is the land to the north, bisected by the railway line, of the Fuel Depot. Reference should be made to giving consideration to the allocation, and therefore its safeguarding.

AL4 Westhampnett/North East Chichester
Reference should be made to minerals safeguarding, for consistency with other allocations, as within the sharp sand and gravel safeguarding area.

AL5 Southern Gateway
Reference should be made to the mineral infrastructure safeguarding policy M10 as within 200m of the Chichester Railhead.

AL6 South-West of Chichester
Reference should be made to the mineral infrastructure safeguarding policy M10 as within 300m of the Chichester Railhead.

AL7 Highgrove Farm Bosham
Remove reference to minerals safeguarding as the site is not within the safeguarding or consultation area.

AL12 Park Farm Selsey
Reference should be made to minerals safeguarding as site is within the sharp sand and gravel safeguarding area.

Neighbourhood plan allocations
Sites are yet to be allocated though neighbourhood plans. It is considered that the Joint Minerals Local Plan and Waste Local Plan are referenced, particularly with regards to safeguarding policies (M9, M10 and W2) and these documents and policies are given detailed consideration when allocating sites. Development at, adjacent or proximal to existing waste or mineral sites / infrastructure should be the subject to consultation with WSCC.


Connectivity and Sustainable Travel
The County council has worked with the District Council on the preparation of the transport evidence base study undertaken by Peter Brett Associates for the District Council. The recommended transport mitigation strategy, as assessed using the Chichester Area Transport Model has been demonstrated to be capable in principle to prevent the development from resulting in severe residual cumulative impacts on the highways and transport network. However, the recommended strategy has several risks to deliverability and acceptability associated with it, which require further work to be undertaken to demonstrate that the strategy can be implemented in its current form to provide the forecasted mitigation to travel conditions.

There are three locations where new highway alignments are proposed outside of existing highways boundaries. Two of these may include significant earthworks or structures to be delivered, being Stockbridge Link Road and Terminus Road diversion. The cost of the mitigation strategy exceeds a figure which could reasonably be supported by the value of the proposed development developer contributions alone, therefore the delivery of the strategy will depend upon securing of external grant funding to top up developer contributions. WSCC will work with the District Council in supporting and or applying for funding, the District Council needing to secure Highways England to support funding applications for A27 improvements. The proposed junction designs for the A27 Stockbridge and Whyke roundabouts include bans to well used right turn movements off the Chichester A27 bypass which result in significant forecast changes to traffic flows on local roads in the south of Chichester and on the Manhood Peninsular.

There is a need to ensure the land outside the highway boundary is available and the plan should set out how this land will be acquired to deliver the measures, it may be that a commitment to use, if required, and therefore reference to CPO be made in the policy.

Funding for the mitigation strategy is uncertain. It is considered that the Plan should set out how it will deal with this uncertainty. This could include trigger points in the monitoring framework to trigger a change of approach or alternative options to deliver the required development.

These factors mean that feasibility work is necessary to be undertaken prior to Plan submission, to reduce as far as practicable risks to costs, land take, impacts and deliverability of the proposed transport strategy in order to show that the strategy can be implemented within the plan period and that the funding strategy will be sufficient to meet the design requirements. In particular the following will need to be addressed:

* Statutory undertakers equipment under the roads junctions to be impacted.
* Extent of earthworks required to create a vertical and horizontal alignment compliant with design standards. Design audit to identify any required departures from standard.
* Designing for drainage and flooding issues, including compliance with the WSCC LLFA Policy for the Management of Surface Water, November 2018.
* Designs for structures to cross watercourses - Stockbridge Link Road
* Design should include suitable provision for rights of way and footway crossings
* Scoping for whether and at what level further Environmental Impact Assessment will be required.
* Stage 1 Road safety Audit, designers response report and resulting amendments to designs.
* Land take required after feasibility level designs have been developed and availability of required land.
* Wophams Lane - impacts of forecast changes to flow patterns to take B2201 southbound traffic on requirements for highway width, alignment, footway provision and junctions with A286 Birdham Road and B2201 Selsey Road; design solution required.
* Quarry Lane, Kingsham Avenue /Road, Terminus Road; impacts of forecast flow changes on highway users, residential and commercial frontagers and measures to manage through traffic whilst maintaining local access

Sustainable transport measures will also be required to mitigate planned development. These will be identified through more detailed assessments of sites including pre-application consideration. Funding will need to be identified through development and other sources as well in some cases.

Public Rights of Way
There is support for the Local Plan Review's approach to Public Rights Of Way (PROW), not just for the potential to impact on existing public off-road access but also the opportunity it brings to enhance this access for the benefit of future residents, communities and visitors. PROW deliver benefits for personal health and wellbeing; sustainable transport; reduction of air pollution and road congestion; are able to support local economies; and they connect communities.
WSCC PROW welcomes several aspects of the Vision statement, which give support to the protection and enhancement of the PROW network, and provision of safe and convenient off-road access opportunities for residents and visitors:

* Pursue a healthy lifestyle and benefit from a sense of well-being supported by good access to education, health, leisure, open space and nature, sports and other essential facilities;
* Live in sustainable neighbourhoods supported by necessary infrastructure and facilities;
* Move around safely and conveniently with opportunities to choose alternatives to car travel.

The Local Plan Strategic Objectives offer further support to enhance off-road access, particularly to 'Encourage healthy and active lifestyles for all, developing accessible health and leisure facilities and linked green spaces'. However, the objective to 'Achieve a sustainable and integrated transport system through improved cycling networks and links to public transport' should recognise walking also as an important mode for many people; some strategic enhancements will significantly improve walkers' safety and convenience.

It is considered that West of Chichester the A259 could act as a corridor for increased volumes of non-motorised access, particularly cycling. Improvement of the existing on-road facility and development of a various 'feeder' routes to connect with the many settlements, perhaps using quiet lanes in places, would encourage cycling particularly to be a natural alternative to vehicle use. Policy S18: Integrated Coastal Zone Management for the Manhood Peninsula, gives regard to such an ambition in stating it will 'Improve infrastructure to support sustainable modes of transport, especially cycle ways, bridleways and footpaths, including the National Coastal Footpath'.

The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) Open Space and Recreation, para 97b) states:
the loss resulting from the proposed development would be replaced by equivalent or better provision in terms of quantity and quality in a suitable location.
The NPPF para 98 also states:
Planning policies and decisions should protect and enhance public rights of way and access, including taking opportunities to provide better facilities for users, for example by adding links to existing rights of way networks including National Trails.'
There is support for Policy S20: Design, that recognises these requirements in stating development 'is well connected to provide safe and convenient ease of movement by all users, prioritising pedestrian and cycle movements both within the scheme and neighbouring areas and ensuring that the needs of vehicular traffic does not dominate at the expense of other modes of transport, or undermine the resulting quality of places' and 'incorporates and/or links to high quality Green Infrastructure and landscaping to enhance biodiversity and meet recreational needs, including public rights of way'.


Education
As the local education authority, WSCC has the statutory duty to ensure that there is a sufficient supply of suitable school places to meet statutory requirements for early years, primary, secondary and sixth form provision (including up to age 25 for those with special educational needs and/or disabilities). Education infrastructure, or contributions to provide infrastructure, will be required in order to mitigate proposed development. We will continue to work with CDC in preparation of the Local Plan Review and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan regarding education and other service requirements in order to mitigate planned development.

The table below sets out the primary, secondary school and sixth form requirements to mitigate proposed development. SEE ATTACHMENT FOR TABLE

AL1 Land West of Chichester

It should be noted that phase one of this development will provide the primary school with the core of the building being built to the specification for a 2 form entry (FE) school and 1FE teaching accommodation. Phase 2 as per 6.10 on page 93 should include expansion of the primary school for the further 1FE of teaching accommodation.

AL2 Land at Shopwhyke (Oving Parish)

No update to original response for this allocation is required.

AL3 Land East of Chichester - previously South of Shopwhyke

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there is insufficient space within the primary schools that serve this proposed development. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Land for a 1 FE expandable to 2FE and pro rata share of the build costs would be required.

If numbers were to increase on the east side of the city, education provision will need to be reviewed, potentially a further 1FE may be required including land provision, this could be in the form of an expansion or a new school being built capable of expansion to 3FE.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL4 Land at Westhampnett / North East Chichester

The remaining 200 dwellings will impact on the education provision in the area, financial contributions towards expansion of existing or pro rata costs towards the expansion of the school within AL3.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL5 Southern Gateway

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from the strategic allocation of 350 dwellings in the Southern Gateway. However, consideration should be given to the cumulative impact of housing in the area Land South West of Chichester (AL6) to allocate land within the area for a 1FE expandable to 2FE primary school. Pro rata financial contributions towards the build costs would be sought from developers to mitigate their impact.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL6 Land South West of Chichester (Apuldram & Donnington Parishes)

It should be noted that the primary education provision in this area is either in Chichester City Centre which means crossing the main A27 or by travelling south towards the peninsula. Consideration should be given to the cumulative impact of further housing in the area along with the Southern Gateway allocation (AL5) to allocate land within the strategic allocation site for a 1FE expandable to 2FE primary school. Pro rata financial contributions towards the build costs would be sought from developers to mitigate their impact.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL7 Bosham

The current primary provision serving the area is at capacity, expansion of the school on its existing site is not possible. As part of the strategic allocation, it is proposed that land for a 2FE primary school be provided. The strategic allocation of 250 dwellings in isolation does not require a new school to be built. Certainty over the land allocation and sufficient funding will be key drivers in realising this proposal.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL9 Fishbourne

The primary school serving the area is currently at capacity, expansion of the school may be possible, feasibility / options appraisals would need to be undertaken.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of primary and secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

AL8 East Wittering

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development.

Contributions would be required for expansion of primary and secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL10 Chidham and Hambrook area

The current primary provision serving the area is at capacity, expansion of the school on its existing site is not possible. As part of the strategic allocation, it is proposed that land for a 2FE primary school be provided. Certainty over the land allocation and sufficient funding will be key drivers in realising this proposal.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL11 Hunston

Any development within this area cannot currently be accommodated in the existing primary school at North Mundham. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development, CDC will need to work with WSCC to determine how additional capacity in the area could be accommodated if land is to be allocated.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

AL12 Selsey

Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Contributions (and possibly land if required) would be sought to meet the pupil product from the development in the most appropriate form once this can be clarified.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL13 Southbourne

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there is insufficient space within the primary schools that serve this proposed development. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Land for a 2form entry expandable to 3FE primary school and pro rata share of the build costs would be required.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL14 Tangmere

The current allocation of 1,300 dwellings will bring forward the requirement for land for a 1FE expandable to 2FE and financial contributions would be sought to meet the pupil product from the development in the most appropriate form once this can be clarified.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

Footnote: - if all of the proposed sites were to come forward the secondary school and sixth form provision would be full in the Chichester Planning Area. Expansion of the secondary schools in the Chichester Planning Area to cater for the increased demand would need to be sought from the academy sponsors, where appropriate and the Local Authority.


Lead Local Flood Authority
The Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA) is concerned about the approach being taken with regard to ensuring potential wastewater treatment for proposed new sustainable development.

Paragraph 8 of the NPPF states:
8. Achieving sustainable development means that the planning system has three overarching objectives, which are interdependent and need to be pursued in mutually supportive ways (so that opportunities can be taken to secure net gains across each of the different objectives):

a) An economic objective - to help build a strong, responsive and competitive
economy, by ensuring that sufficient land of the right types is available in the
right places and at the right time to support growth, innovation and improved
productivity; and by identifying and coordinating the provision of infrastructure;

Paragraph 20 of the NPPF states:
20. Strategic policies should set out an overall strategy for the pattern, scale and quality of development, and make sufficient provision for:
a) housing (including affordable housing), employment, retail, leisure and other commercial development;
b) infrastructure for transport, telecommunications, security, waste management, water supply, wastewater, flood risk and coastal change management, and the provision of minerals and energy (including heat);

In the LLFAs view, the Local Plan Review is not setting out an overall strategy for the pattern, scale and quality of development in relation to arrangements for wastewater management. The LLFA considers that CDC needs to go further in incorporating within the Local Plan Review how this provision is being made.


Additional Policy Comments

Policy S12: Infrastructure Provision
Support the requirement that all development must provide or fund new infrastructure, facilities and services required, both on and off-site (including full fibre communications infrastructure) as a consequence of the proposal. The explicit reference to full fibre communications infrastructure is supported as this will provide gigabit-capable and future-proofed services to all development, existing and new. The reference to provision of facilities and services on and off-site is also supported as in the case of broadband for example, all development will be adequately equipped with the necessary infrastructure installed for the purposes of connecting to full fibre gigabit-capable broadband services. This policy supports the County Council's aim for increased digital infrastructure that will provide for gigabit-capable broadband and future technologies such as 5G.

Support the reference to safeguarding educational facilities under section 3 of the policy.

The policy includes the requirement to 'Facilitate accessibility to facilities and services by a range of transport modes'. PROW can offer vital access means for walkers and cyclists, such as for employment land use (e.g. commuting by bicycle) and in support of the high street, both for employees and customers. IT is considered that this Policy, also Policy S13: Chichester City Development Principles, should aim to encourage such access to be the natural and preferred modes of access, thereby helping achieve the benefits previously described. It is noted Policy S14: Chichester City Transport Strategy, does acknowledge cycling and walking and lends support to their improvement.

The supporting text, paragraph 4.81 makes reference to the Strategic Infrastructure Package (SIP). It is requested that this wording is removed and replaced with West Sussex County Council identifies service infrastructure requirements necessary to support new and existing communities, where strategic development and growth is proposed in Local Plans. These are required to deliver the County Council's statutory responsibilities, strategic objectives and current policy and feed into the preparation of the Infrastructure Delivery Plan.


Policy S13: Chichester City Development Principles
This policy, like policy S12, it is considered should aim to encourage such access to be the natural and preferred modes of access, thereby helping achieve the benefits previously described. It is noted Policy S14: Chichester City Transport Strategy, does acknowledge cycling and walking and lends support to their improvement.


Policy S23: Transport and Accessibility
The policy and supporting text paragraphs 5.15 - 5.33 refer to Transport Infrastructure. Understandably much consideration is given to the A27 around Chichester; however, in addition to seeking new infrastructure from new development, it is recommended support in principle is given to maximising the value of existing infrastructure so as to facilitate off-road user modes accessing either side of the A27.


S24: Countryside
Supporting text paragraphs 5.34 - 5.43, acknowledges 'it is necessary to provide for the social and economic needs of small rural communities, and enable those who manage, live and work in the countryside to continue to do so'. It is recognised in para 7.205, supporting text to policy SM35 Equestrian Development, the high numbers of liveried and stabled horses. A considerable network of businesses are supported by such a high equine population, and in addition to financial value within the local community there is considerable benefit in terms of health and wellbeing of individuals. It is suggested that Policy S24: Countryside, could recognise this specifically.


S27: Flood Risk Management
Supporting text paragraph 5.54, requested amendments underlined - as a consequence of the rise in sea levels and storm surges, parts of the plan area will be at increased risk from coastal erosion, groundwater, fluvial and/or tidal flooding. Hard defences may not be possible to maintain in the long term, therefore development needs to be strongly restricted in areas at risk to flooding and erosion, whilst ensuring that existing towns and villages are protected by sustainable means that make space for water in suitable areas. Development must take account of the policies of the relevant shoreline management plan

Supporting text paragraph 5.58, requested amendments underlined - Built development can lead to increased surface water run-off; therefore new
development is encouraged to incorporate mitigation techniques in its design, such as permeable surfaces and Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS). Where appropriate, SuDS should be used as part of the linked green infrastructure network to provide multiple functions and benefits to landscape quality, recreation and biodiversity. This can be achieved through habitat creation, new open spaces and good design. SuDS should be designed to help cope with intense rainfall events and to overcome any deterioration in water quality status. In determining the suitability of SuDS for individual development sites, developers should refer to guidance published by the Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA): West Sussex LLFA Policy for the Management of Surface Water: https://www.westsussex.gov.uk/media/12230/ws_llfa_policy_for_management_of_surface_water.pdf and, if necessary, seek further advice from the Lead Local Flood Authority LLFA.

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 1 - a. through a sequential approach, taking into consideration all forms of flooding, it is located in the lowest appropriate flood risk location in accordance with the NPPF and the Chichester Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA); and

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 2. Sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) will be required on major developments (10 or more dwellings or equivalent) and encouraged for smaller schemes. SUDS should be designed into the landscape of all new development and should be included as part of a District wide approach to improve water quality and provide flood mitigation. A site-specific Flood Risk Assessment will be required for sites within or adjacent to areas at risk of surface water flooding as identified in the SFRA. There should be no increase in either the volume or rate of surface water runoff leaving the site.

S27 policy text requested additional bullet point as number 4 - Clear management arrangements and funding for their ongoing maintenance over the lifetime of the development should be proposed. Planning conditions and / or obligations will be used to secure these arrangements.

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 2, but would be section 5 - Development should not result in any property or highway, on or off site, being at greater risk of flooding than the 1 in 100 year storm return period, including an allowance for climate change.


Policy S29: Green Infrastructure
The Green Infrastructure policy is welcomed, including provision of new Green Infrastructure as an integral part of the development at Strategic Development Locations. It is recommended that measures are put in place to secure the long term management of such Green Infrastructure.


Policy S30: Strategic Wildlife Corridors
The identification of Strategic Wildlife Corridors and inclusion of a policy to safeguard them from development is welcomed. It is recommended that CDC promotes positive conservation management within these corridors to maximise their contribution to maintaining and enhancing biodiversity. As stated in Section 5.66, 'These corridors do not stop at the plan area boundaries.' Thus, it is recommended that CDC works in partnership with Chichester Harbour Conservancy and The South Downs National Park Authority to ensure that these Strategic Wildlife Corridors continue to provide effective corridors and connectivity across the wider landscape.

Section 5.66 refers to four Strategic Wildlife Corridors connecting Chichester Harbour with the South Downs National Park but it is noted that there is no mention of the Strategic Wildlife Corridors to the east of Chichester which connect Pagham Harbour with the South Downs National Park (as seen in Policy Map S30b). It is also noted that the maps referred to in Section 5.66, Maps 5.1 & 5.2 are missing.

WSCC and CDC promoted a Mitigated Northern Route for the A27 at Chichester as the preferred option, subject to the inclusion of important mitigation measures that are needed to make the scheme acceptable in environmental terms and the 'full southern route' as a reasonable alternative. Both routes could impact on the identified Strategic Wildlife Corridors. As currently drafted, Policy S30 would seem to prevent a mitigated northern route from coming forward in the future. Therefore, the District Council should consider whether the policy is overly restrictive (for example should it refer to 'significant adverse impacts' or 'unacceptable adverse impacts'?) and how it would be applied if a northern route for A27 were to come forward in the future.


Policy S31: Wastewater Management and Water Quality
S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 3, this - Where appropriate, development should contribute to the delivery of identified actions to deliver infiltration reduction across the catchment. Where appropriate development should contribute to the delivery of identified actions to deliver a reduction in the level of infiltration of groundwater into the sewer system.


Policy AL1: Land West of Chichester
AL1 policy text requested additional bullet point as number 8 - Increase capacity to attenuate surface water on site, thereby reducing the discharge flows off the site below current rates and reducing the risk of flooding to residential areas downstream.

AL1 policy text requested additional bullet point under 15 as 15 b- Provide mitigation for any loss of watercourse habitat resulting from culverting for highway provision in the development;

AL1 policy text in supporting 'improved cycle and pedestrian routes linking the site with the city, Fishbourne and the South Downs National Park', a new key link for cycling will be to Salthill Road, thereby enabling cyclists to benefit from the existing bridge crossing of the A27 for journeys to and from the west.


AL2: Land at Shopwyke (Oving Parish)
The policy acknowledges need 'for foot/cycle bridge across A27 to Coach Road'. There is also need for equestrian users to cross the A27 and WSCC PROW has received several enquiries seeking support for such infrastructure. Consideration could be given to the proposed bridge providing for all three modes.


AL3: East of Chichester (Oving Parish)
AL3 supporting text requested amendments underlined for paragraph 6.22 - The site is identified for 600 dwellings, however, there may be potential to deliver a large strategic development of 1000 dwellings, subject to further evidence, including the testing of additional growth on the local highway network and capacity of the site to provide flood risk attenuation for the increased housing density. The site should be master planned as a whole, and delivered through a phased development over a ten year period. Although the site is physically separated from the city by the A27 Chichester Bypass, the development should form a planned extension to the city, forming a new neighbourhood. This will involve opportunities to provide new facilities to serve the wider local community with good off-site access, particularly by walking and cycling to existing local facilities and facilities in the city.

AL3 policy requires exploring integrated green infrastructure with other strategic sites to the north east of the city, Tangmere and the wider countryside. It is considered that future residents will have expectations for provision of safe and convenient links towards Oving and also across the railway to link to the A259 cycle path and PROW south of the A259. It is considered that the policy should be strengthened to ensure such provision.


Policy AL4: Land at Westhampnett/North East Chichester
AL4 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 3 - Open space and green infrastructure, including a linear greenspace with public access along the Lavant Valley.

Taking into account the site-specific requirements, proposals for the site should satisfy the following requirements:

Policy AL4 policy, it is welcomed that 'provision should be made for green links to the South Downs National Park and Chichester City.' Safe and convenient walking and cycling to Lavant, from where people will access the South Downs, will provide for sustainable transport use.


Policy AL5 Southern Gateway
AL5 supporting text requested amendments underlined for paragraph 6.38 - The area has been identified as suitable for comprehensive regeneration with the aim being to make it a more attractive and welcoming gateway for the city, providing new housing, business and retail space and leisure and tourism facilities. Opportunities will be identified to improve transport links with a focus on cycling, walking and public transport and the removal of non-essential traffic from the area. There is also scope for significant public space enhancements and new landscaping incorporating blue / green infrastructure delivering multi-functional benefits.

AL5 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 5 - Provision of open space that:
* Is in accordance with Policy DM34, including retention of the existing playing pitch unless suitable re-provision is provided;
* Reinforces / enhances green and blue infrastructure consistent with Policy S29 and fully exploits the opportunities for sustainable drainage.


AL5 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 8 - Provision of both a surface and waste water management plan which demonstrates no net increase in flow to Apuldram Waste Water Treatment Works would result from this development, unless suitable alternative provision is agreed;


Policy AL6: Land South-West of Chichester (Apuldram and Donnington Parishes)
The LLFA has concerns regarding the lack of reference to flood risk constraints of the site in Policy AL6. There is reference to flood risk in paragraph 6.47. However, the policy itself makes no reference to these constraints.
The constraints arise from a combination of the following:

* Current tidal /fluvial flood risk extending from Chichester harbour to the west and up the River Lavant floodplain; (Map 1)
* Future tidal /fluvial flood risk associated with climate change; (Map 1)
* Constraints on infiltration of surface water run off because of high seasonal groundwater levels (<0.025m below the surface) (Map 2); and
* Constraints on gravity outfalls because of the low relief and long-term reduction in tidal window for discharge.

The above limits the options for how the site can be effectively drained without a step change from typically employed methods to embrace more innovative and currently expensive options e.g. blue roofs and rainwater harvesting.

The LLFA recommends that the policy sets out both the above constraints and the type of innovative drainage that will be required to achieve the development objectives for the site.



Key: Projected medium projection extent of SLR based upon 4m contour

AL6 extent

Current Flood Zone 3 extent.

Current Areas of high (1:30) surface water flood risk

Map 1 Existing and projected Tidal and surface water flood risk for AL6.

Consistent with paragraph 3.2 of the SFRA, given the high risk of flooding both now and into the future for this site, it is recommended that CDC gives consideration to the climate change maps to understand how the flood zones are predicted to change over the lifetime of the development.


Key:
AL6 boundary.

Groundwater levels are either at very near (within 0.025m of) the ground surface.

Groundwater levels are between 0.025m and 0.5m below the ground surface

Map 2 Groundwater flood risk JBA

Policy AL6 WSCC PROW considers 'necessary highway improvements to adequately mitigate the likely impacts on the highway network' to include a bridge crossing of the A27 for convenient walking and cycling access to the Terminus Road industrial estate and the city. There is an existing public footpath but, as this crosses the A27 at-grade, this will not provide the safest facility and not encourage people to minimise use of vehicles for local access. Provision of a bridge and access through the site could also establish a valuable link to the popular Salterns Way walking and cycle path. An additional link to Salterns Way should also be provided off the A286 for the benefit of Stockbridge residents as a safer alternative to the A286.


AL 7 Highgrove Farm, Bosham
The LLFA notes that the above site has the potential for a moderate risk of groundwater flooding. It is likely that this is perched groundwater draining from higher ground / springs to the north that lies in the superficial mixed sediments underlain by Lambeth Clay.


Policy AL8: East Wittering Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The policy requires 'Opportunities ... for the expansion and provision of green infrastructure into the wider countryside including between settlements and facilities'. Existing and future residents and the local visitor economy would benefit by delivery of an off-road route for walkers, cyclists and horse riders to and from the Medmerry development and towards Selsey. It is considered that Policy AL8 should aim to deliver this enhancement specifically.


Policy AL9: Fishbourne Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

It is considered that off-road cycling links to land West of Chichester (off Salthill Road) and to Bosham (off Park Lane) would benefit this community with enhanced sustainable connectivity.


Policy AL10: Chidham and Hambrook Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The policy requires 'opportunities' to develop green infrastructure and links to other communities. An opportunity, in conjunction with Highways England, exists to maximise the value of existing infrastructure by creating a new bridleway (for walkers, cyclists and horse riders) on a path using an existing A27 overbridge.


Policy AL11: Hunston Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The village is already well connected for walkers to access the surrounding countryside but there are presently no local cycling or horse riding facilities on the PROW network. A bridleway link to South Mundham (with the potential for future cycle links to Pagham and towards Bognor Regis) and to Sidlesham via the golf course and Brimfast Lane would provide residents and visitors with improved access to the countryside and services.


Policy AL12: Land North of Park Farm, Selsey
It is unclear why the policy map shows the proposed strategic allocation lies outside of the Neighbourhood Plan proposed settlement boundary. Some explanation for this anomaly would be helpful in the text.


Groundwater flood risk as depicted by JBA mapping (Brown = seasonal groundwater level lies between 0.025 and 0.5m below the surface).

The principle concern that the LLFA wishes to highlight is the need to ensure that the necessary foul sewerage infrastructure to support development is in place. It is the LLFA understanding that the Siddlesham WWTW experiences capacity issues currently, in part exacerbated by groundwater infiltration. While Policy AL12 states: Development proposals will need to demonstrate that sufficient capacity will be available within the sewer network, including waste water treatment works, to accommodate the proposed development in accordance with Policy S31.

The policy proposes only to provide 'pedestrian links between the site and new development south of Park Lane'. It is considered that cycling links should also be provided.


Policy DM8: Transport, Accessibility and Parking
The PROW network can provide vital means for communities to interact and encourage sustainable local access. The policy requirement to create 'links between new development and existing pedestrian, cycle and public transport networks' is welcomed. However, establishing links into surrounding existing development should not be overlooked also - the greater the permeability, the greater the use.


Policy DM10: New Employment Sites
Whilst mentioned earlier in the Plan in respect of a number of specific sites, this policy should specifically aim to provide, as a matter of course, suitable walking and cycling infrastructure to encourage local sustainable access. This infrastructure may need to extend outside a site boundary so as to provide safe and convenient connection to existing infrastructure. This principle should apply also to Policy DM13: Built Tourist and Leisure Development and Policy DM14: Caravan and Camping Sites.


Policy DM32: Green Infrastructure
Whilst it is recognised the policy proposes support subject to not 'dissect[ing] ... the linear network of cycle ways, public rights of way, bridleways ...', the policy could lend support to establishing new routes as part of the Green Infrastructure network itself.


Policy DM35: Equestrian Development
It is appreciated why the Plan would wish to require future equine development to be 'well related to or has improved links to the existing bridleway network'. However, this will add to the pressure of use on the existing bridleway network, which is not extensive outside of the South Downs, so will increase degradation of paths. Future developments must, therefore, accept to contribute in some way, acceptable to the local highway authority, to mitigate the additional impact to be created so all lawful users are not disadvantaged.


Policy DM29: Biodiversity
The measures to safeguard and enhance the biodiversity value of development sites are welcomed, including seeking net biodiversity gain.


Schedule of proposed changes to the policies map
S30a West of City Corridors -suggest title should be West of City Strategic Wildlife Corridors (to match S30b: East of City Strategic Wildlife Corridors. The Strategic Wildlife Corridors are depicted in different colour patterns on the two plans which is somewhat confusing.


Strategic Wildlife Corridors Local Plan Review Background Paper
Proposed Hermitage to Westbourne Strategic Wildlife Corridor
A large area depicted as Biodiversity Opportunity Area (BOA) in Fig. 1 (immediately to the south of the Rivers Ems & Meadows Local Wildlife Site, Westbourne) is in fact housing and forms part of the settlement of Westbourne. You should consider if this land should be included as having potential for biodiversity enhancement.


Glossary
Includes Sites of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCIs) but not Local Wildlife Sites (LWSs). SNCIs are now known as LWSs.

Attachments:

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2123

Received: 15/02/2019

Respondent: West Sussex County Council

Representation Summary:

Education
- The remaining 200 dwellings will impact on the education provision - financial contributions towards expansion of existing or pro rata costs towards the expansion of the school within AL3.
- expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.
- expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

Full text:

West Sussex County Council Officer Level Response
Introduction
The Chichester Local Plan Review Preferred Approach sets out how the future development in the District will be shaped, excluding the area within the South Downs National Park, up to 2035. It includes the overall development strategy as well as relevant strategic policies to meet the future needs of the area and development management policies to help guide development over the plan period. The Local Plan helps to:
* choose where the development goes;
* protect the character and beauty of the area;
* provide job and housing opportunities so that children can continue to work and live locally;
* support and help to boost the local economy;
* help residents to maintain healthy and active lifestyles; and,
* make sure that there is adequate services, travel options and community facilities.

The Chichester Local Plan was adopted in July 2015. At that time, the Local Plan was approved, but the Government Inspector said that it had to be reviewed again within five years, to make sure that sufficient housing was planned to meet the needs of the area.

The first part of the review process was carried out in June 2017 with an Issues and Options consultation, in which comments were invited regarding the overall development strategy and possible development locations. The Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach is the second stage of the process. It sets out the proposed development strategy and policies for the area to meet future needs.


West Sussex County Council Officer Level Comments
This note sets out West Sussex County Council's (WSCC) officer response to the consultation on the draft Chichester Local Plan Review Preferred Approach. It highlights key issues and suggested changes to which Chichester District Council (CDC) is requested to give consideration. We will continue to work with CDC in preparation of the Local Plan Review and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan regarding WSCC service requirements in order to mitigate planned development.


Minerals and Waste
A steady and adequate supply of minerals and the achievement of sustainable waste management can help to achieve a District or Borough Council's goals in relation to the economy, housing, transport, communications, strategic infrastructure and the environment. Therefore, District and Borough Local Plans should recognise the importance of minerals and waste issues as relevant to the scope of their overall strategies.

We welcome the reference to the adopted Minerals and Waste Local Plans and safeguarding in the document and the requirements in policies where a site is located within a minerals safeguarding area, or near to a safeguarded waste site. There are some missing references to safeguarding of minerals and waste sites for some of the proposed allocations, set out below and request that these references are added. It is also requested that 'Joint' is added into the references for the Joint Minerals Local Plan through the document.

Policy W23 of the Waste Local Plan applies to all Districts & Boroughs, regarding waste management within development and should be referenced in the Chichester Local Plan Review.

AL3 East of Chichester
The site is to the north of the Fuel Depot site allocation in the Waste Local Plan (Policy W10) for a built waste facility as part of a comprehensive redevelopment of the site (including complimentary non-waste uses). The East of Chichester allocation is the land to the north, bisected by the railway line, of the Fuel Depot. Reference should be made to giving consideration to the allocation, and therefore its safeguarding.

AL4 Westhampnett/North East Chichester
Reference should be made to minerals safeguarding, for consistency with other allocations, as within the sharp sand and gravel safeguarding area.

AL5 Southern Gateway
Reference should be made to the mineral infrastructure safeguarding policy M10 as within 200m of the Chichester Railhead.

AL6 South-West of Chichester
Reference should be made to the mineral infrastructure safeguarding policy M10 as within 300m of the Chichester Railhead.

AL7 Highgrove Farm Bosham
Remove reference to minerals safeguarding as the site is not within the safeguarding or consultation area.

AL12 Park Farm Selsey
Reference should be made to minerals safeguarding as site is within the sharp sand and gravel safeguarding area.

Neighbourhood plan allocations
Sites are yet to be allocated though neighbourhood plans. It is considered that the Joint Minerals Local Plan and Waste Local Plan are referenced, particularly with regards to safeguarding policies (M9, M10 and W2) and these documents and policies are given detailed consideration when allocating sites. Development at, adjacent or proximal to existing waste or mineral sites / infrastructure should be the subject to consultation with WSCC.


Connectivity and Sustainable Travel
The County council has worked with the District Council on the preparation of the transport evidence base study undertaken by Peter Brett Associates for the District Council. The recommended transport mitigation strategy, as assessed using the Chichester Area Transport Model has been demonstrated to be capable in principle to prevent the development from resulting in severe residual cumulative impacts on the highways and transport network. However, the recommended strategy has several risks to deliverability and acceptability associated with it, which require further work to be undertaken to demonstrate that the strategy can be implemented in its current form to provide the forecasted mitigation to travel conditions.

There are three locations where new highway alignments are proposed outside of existing highways boundaries. Two of these may include significant earthworks or structures to be delivered, being Stockbridge Link Road and Terminus Road diversion. The cost of the mitigation strategy exceeds a figure which could reasonably be supported by the value of the proposed development developer contributions alone, therefore the delivery of the strategy will depend upon securing of external grant funding to top up developer contributions. WSCC will work with the District Council in supporting and or applying for funding, the District Council needing to secure Highways England to support funding applications for A27 improvements. The proposed junction designs for the A27 Stockbridge and Whyke roundabouts include bans to well used right turn movements off the Chichester A27 bypass which result in significant forecast changes to traffic flows on local roads in the south of Chichester and on the Manhood Peninsular.

There is a need to ensure the land outside the highway boundary is available and the plan should set out how this land will be acquired to deliver the measures, it may be that a commitment to use, if required, and therefore reference to CPO be made in the policy.

Funding for the mitigation strategy is uncertain. It is considered that the Plan should set out how it will deal with this uncertainty. This could include trigger points in the monitoring framework to trigger a change of approach or alternative options to deliver the required development.

These factors mean that feasibility work is necessary to be undertaken prior to Plan submission, to reduce as far as practicable risks to costs, land take, impacts and deliverability of the proposed transport strategy in order to show that the strategy can be implemented within the plan period and that the funding strategy will be sufficient to meet the design requirements. In particular the following will need to be addressed:

* Statutory undertakers equipment under the roads junctions to be impacted.
* Extent of earthworks required to create a vertical and horizontal alignment compliant with design standards. Design audit to identify any required departures from standard.
* Designing for drainage and flooding issues, including compliance with the WSCC LLFA Policy for the Management of Surface Water, November 2018.
* Designs for structures to cross watercourses - Stockbridge Link Road
* Design should include suitable provision for rights of way and footway crossings
* Scoping for whether and at what level further Environmental Impact Assessment will be required.
* Stage 1 Road safety Audit, designers response report and resulting amendments to designs.
* Land take required after feasibility level designs have been developed and availability of required land.
* Wophams Lane - impacts of forecast changes to flow patterns to take B2201 southbound traffic on requirements for highway width, alignment, footway provision and junctions with A286 Birdham Road and B2201 Selsey Road; design solution required.
* Quarry Lane, Kingsham Avenue /Road, Terminus Road; impacts of forecast flow changes on highway users, residential and commercial frontagers and measures to manage through traffic whilst maintaining local access

Sustainable transport measures will also be required to mitigate planned development. These will be identified through more detailed assessments of sites including pre-application consideration. Funding will need to be identified through development and other sources as well in some cases.

Public Rights of Way
There is support for the Local Plan Review's approach to Public Rights Of Way (PROW), not just for the potential to impact on existing public off-road access but also the opportunity it brings to enhance this access for the benefit of future residents, communities and visitors. PROW deliver benefits for personal health and wellbeing; sustainable transport; reduction of air pollution and road congestion; are able to support local economies; and they connect communities.
WSCC PROW welcomes several aspects of the Vision statement, which give support to the protection and enhancement of the PROW network, and provision of safe and convenient off-road access opportunities for residents and visitors:

* Pursue a healthy lifestyle and benefit from a sense of well-being supported by good access to education, health, leisure, open space and nature, sports and other essential facilities;
* Live in sustainable neighbourhoods supported by necessary infrastructure and facilities;
* Move around safely and conveniently with opportunities to choose alternatives to car travel.

The Local Plan Strategic Objectives offer further support to enhance off-road access, particularly to 'Encourage healthy and active lifestyles for all, developing accessible health and leisure facilities and linked green spaces'. However, the objective to 'Achieve a sustainable and integrated transport system through improved cycling networks and links to public transport' should recognise walking also as an important mode for many people; some strategic enhancements will significantly improve walkers' safety and convenience.

It is considered that West of Chichester the A259 could act as a corridor for increased volumes of non-motorised access, particularly cycling. Improvement of the existing on-road facility and development of a various 'feeder' routes to connect with the many settlements, perhaps using quiet lanes in places, would encourage cycling particularly to be a natural alternative to vehicle use. Policy S18: Integrated Coastal Zone Management for the Manhood Peninsula, gives regard to such an ambition in stating it will 'Improve infrastructure to support sustainable modes of transport, especially cycle ways, bridleways and footpaths, including the National Coastal Footpath'.

The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) Open Space and Recreation, para 97b) states:
the loss resulting from the proposed development would be replaced by equivalent or better provision in terms of quantity and quality in a suitable location.
The NPPF para 98 also states:
Planning policies and decisions should protect and enhance public rights of way and access, including taking opportunities to provide better facilities for users, for example by adding links to existing rights of way networks including National Trails.'
There is support for Policy S20: Design, that recognises these requirements in stating development 'is well connected to provide safe and convenient ease of movement by all users, prioritising pedestrian and cycle movements both within the scheme and neighbouring areas and ensuring that the needs of vehicular traffic does not dominate at the expense of other modes of transport, or undermine the resulting quality of places' and 'incorporates and/or links to high quality Green Infrastructure and landscaping to enhance biodiversity and meet recreational needs, including public rights of way'.


Education
As the local education authority, WSCC has the statutory duty to ensure that there is a sufficient supply of suitable school places to meet statutory requirements for early years, primary, secondary and sixth form provision (including up to age 25 for those with special educational needs and/or disabilities). Education infrastructure, or contributions to provide infrastructure, will be required in order to mitigate proposed development. We will continue to work with CDC in preparation of the Local Plan Review and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan regarding education and other service requirements in order to mitigate planned development.

The table below sets out the primary, secondary school and sixth form requirements to mitigate proposed development. SEE ATTACHMENT FOR TABLE

AL1 Land West of Chichester

It should be noted that phase one of this development will provide the primary school with the core of the building being built to the specification for a 2 form entry (FE) school and 1FE teaching accommodation. Phase 2 as per 6.10 on page 93 should include expansion of the primary school for the further 1FE of teaching accommodation.

AL2 Land at Shopwhyke (Oving Parish)

No update to original response for this allocation is required.

AL3 Land East of Chichester - previously South of Shopwhyke

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there is insufficient space within the primary schools that serve this proposed development. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Land for a 1 FE expandable to 2FE and pro rata share of the build costs would be required.

If numbers were to increase on the east side of the city, education provision will need to be reviewed, potentially a further 1FE may be required including land provision, this could be in the form of an expansion or a new school being built capable of expansion to 3FE.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL4 Land at Westhampnett / North East Chichester

The remaining 200 dwellings will impact on the education provision in the area, financial contributions towards expansion of existing or pro rata costs towards the expansion of the school within AL3.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL5 Southern Gateway

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from the strategic allocation of 350 dwellings in the Southern Gateway. However, consideration should be given to the cumulative impact of housing in the area Land South West of Chichester (AL6) to allocate land within the area for a 1FE expandable to 2FE primary school. Pro rata financial contributions towards the build costs would be sought from developers to mitigate their impact.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL6 Land South West of Chichester (Apuldram & Donnington Parishes)

It should be noted that the primary education provision in this area is either in Chichester City Centre which means crossing the main A27 or by travelling south towards the peninsula. Consideration should be given to the cumulative impact of further housing in the area along with the Southern Gateway allocation (AL5) to allocate land within the strategic allocation site for a 1FE expandable to 2FE primary school. Pro rata financial contributions towards the build costs would be sought from developers to mitigate their impact.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL7 Bosham

The current primary provision serving the area is at capacity, expansion of the school on its existing site is not possible. As part of the strategic allocation, it is proposed that land for a 2FE primary school be provided. The strategic allocation of 250 dwellings in isolation does not require a new school to be built. Certainty over the land allocation and sufficient funding will be key drivers in realising this proposal.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL9 Fishbourne

The primary school serving the area is currently at capacity, expansion of the school may be possible, feasibility / options appraisals would need to be undertaken.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of primary and secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

AL8 East Wittering

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development.

Contributions would be required for expansion of primary and secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL10 Chidham and Hambrook area

The current primary provision serving the area is at capacity, expansion of the school on its existing site is not possible. As part of the strategic allocation, it is proposed that land for a 2FE primary school be provided. Certainty over the land allocation and sufficient funding will be key drivers in realising this proposal.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL11 Hunston

Any development within this area cannot currently be accommodated in the existing primary school at North Mundham. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development, CDC will need to work with WSCC to determine how additional capacity in the area could be accommodated if land is to be allocated.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

AL12 Selsey

Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Contributions (and possibly land if required) would be sought to meet the pupil product from the development in the most appropriate form once this can be clarified.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL13 Southbourne

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there is insufficient space within the primary schools that serve this proposed development. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Land for a 2form entry expandable to 3FE primary school and pro rata share of the build costs would be required.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL14 Tangmere

The current allocation of 1,300 dwellings will bring forward the requirement for land for a 1FE expandable to 2FE and financial contributions would be sought to meet the pupil product from the development in the most appropriate form once this can be clarified.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

Footnote: - if all of the proposed sites were to come forward the secondary school and sixth form provision would be full in the Chichester Planning Area. Expansion of the secondary schools in the Chichester Planning Area to cater for the increased demand would need to be sought from the academy sponsors, where appropriate and the Local Authority.


Lead Local Flood Authority
The Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA) is concerned about the approach being taken with regard to ensuring potential wastewater treatment for proposed new sustainable development.

Paragraph 8 of the NPPF states:
8. Achieving sustainable development means that the planning system has three overarching objectives, which are interdependent and need to be pursued in mutually supportive ways (so that opportunities can be taken to secure net gains across each of the different objectives):

a) An economic objective - to help build a strong, responsive and competitive
economy, by ensuring that sufficient land of the right types is available in the
right places and at the right time to support growth, innovation and improved
productivity; and by identifying and coordinating the provision of infrastructure;

Paragraph 20 of the NPPF states:
20. Strategic policies should set out an overall strategy for the pattern, scale and quality of development, and make sufficient provision for:
a) housing (including affordable housing), employment, retail, leisure and other commercial development;
b) infrastructure for transport, telecommunications, security, waste management, water supply, wastewater, flood risk and coastal change management, and the provision of minerals and energy (including heat);

In the LLFAs view, the Local Plan Review is not setting out an overall strategy for the pattern, scale and quality of development in relation to arrangements for wastewater management. The LLFA considers that CDC needs to go further in incorporating within the Local Plan Review how this provision is being made.


Additional Policy Comments

Policy S12: Infrastructure Provision
Support the requirement that all development must provide or fund new infrastructure, facilities and services required, both on and off-site (including full fibre communications infrastructure) as a consequence of the proposal. The explicit reference to full fibre communications infrastructure is supported as this will provide gigabit-capable and future-proofed services to all development, existing and new. The reference to provision of facilities and services on and off-site is also supported as in the case of broadband for example, all development will be adequately equipped with the necessary infrastructure installed for the purposes of connecting to full fibre gigabit-capable broadband services. This policy supports the County Council's aim for increased digital infrastructure that will provide for gigabit-capable broadband and future technologies such as 5G.

Support the reference to safeguarding educational facilities under section 3 of the policy.

The policy includes the requirement to 'Facilitate accessibility to facilities and services by a range of transport modes'. PROW can offer vital access means for walkers and cyclists, such as for employment land use (e.g. commuting by bicycle) and in support of the high street, both for employees and customers. IT is considered that this Policy, also Policy S13: Chichester City Development Principles, should aim to encourage such access to be the natural and preferred modes of access, thereby helping achieve the benefits previously described. It is noted Policy S14: Chichester City Transport Strategy, does acknowledge cycling and walking and lends support to their improvement.

The supporting text, paragraph 4.81 makes reference to the Strategic Infrastructure Package (SIP). It is requested that this wording is removed and replaced with West Sussex County Council identifies service infrastructure requirements necessary to support new and existing communities, where strategic development and growth is proposed in Local Plans. These are required to deliver the County Council's statutory responsibilities, strategic objectives and current policy and feed into the preparation of the Infrastructure Delivery Plan.


Policy S13: Chichester City Development Principles
This policy, like policy S12, it is considered should aim to encourage such access to be the natural and preferred modes of access, thereby helping achieve the benefits previously described. It is noted Policy S14: Chichester City Transport Strategy, does acknowledge cycling and walking and lends support to their improvement.


Policy S23: Transport and Accessibility
The policy and supporting text paragraphs 5.15 - 5.33 refer to Transport Infrastructure. Understandably much consideration is given to the A27 around Chichester; however, in addition to seeking new infrastructure from new development, it is recommended support in principle is given to maximising the value of existing infrastructure so as to facilitate off-road user modes accessing either side of the A27.


S24: Countryside
Supporting text paragraphs 5.34 - 5.43, acknowledges 'it is necessary to provide for the social and economic needs of small rural communities, and enable those who manage, live and work in the countryside to continue to do so'. It is recognised in para 7.205, supporting text to policy SM35 Equestrian Development, the high numbers of liveried and stabled horses. A considerable network of businesses are supported by such a high equine population, and in addition to financial value within the local community there is considerable benefit in terms of health and wellbeing of individuals. It is suggested that Policy S24: Countryside, could recognise this specifically.


S27: Flood Risk Management
Supporting text paragraph 5.54, requested amendments underlined - as a consequence of the rise in sea levels and storm surges, parts of the plan area will be at increased risk from coastal erosion, groundwater, fluvial and/or tidal flooding. Hard defences may not be possible to maintain in the long term, therefore development needs to be strongly restricted in areas at risk to flooding and erosion, whilst ensuring that existing towns and villages are protected by sustainable means that make space for water in suitable areas. Development must take account of the policies of the relevant shoreline management plan

Supporting text paragraph 5.58, requested amendments underlined - Built development can lead to increased surface water run-off; therefore new
development is encouraged to incorporate mitigation techniques in its design, such as permeable surfaces and Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS). Where appropriate, SuDS should be used as part of the linked green infrastructure network to provide multiple functions and benefits to landscape quality, recreation and biodiversity. This can be achieved through habitat creation, new open spaces and good design. SuDS should be designed to help cope with intense rainfall events and to overcome any deterioration in water quality status. In determining the suitability of SuDS for individual development sites, developers should refer to guidance published by the Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA): West Sussex LLFA Policy for the Management of Surface Water: https://www.westsussex.gov.uk/media/12230/ws_llfa_policy_for_management_of_surface_water.pdf and, if necessary, seek further advice from the Lead Local Flood Authority LLFA.

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 1 - a. through a sequential approach, taking into consideration all forms of flooding, it is located in the lowest appropriate flood risk location in accordance with the NPPF and the Chichester Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA); and

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 2. Sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) will be required on major developments (10 or more dwellings or equivalent) and encouraged for smaller schemes. SUDS should be designed into the landscape of all new development and should be included as part of a District wide approach to improve water quality and provide flood mitigation. A site-specific Flood Risk Assessment will be required for sites within or adjacent to areas at risk of surface water flooding as identified in the SFRA. There should be no increase in either the volume or rate of surface water runoff leaving the site.

S27 policy text requested additional bullet point as number 4 - Clear management arrangements and funding for their ongoing maintenance over the lifetime of the development should be proposed. Planning conditions and / or obligations will be used to secure these arrangements.

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 2, but would be section 5 - Development should not result in any property or highway, on or off site, being at greater risk of flooding than the 1 in 100 year storm return period, including an allowance for climate change.


Policy S29: Green Infrastructure
The Green Infrastructure policy is welcomed, including provision of new Green Infrastructure as an integral part of the development at Strategic Development Locations. It is recommended that measures are put in place to secure the long term management of such Green Infrastructure.


Policy S30: Strategic Wildlife Corridors
The identification of Strategic Wildlife Corridors and inclusion of a policy to safeguard them from development is welcomed. It is recommended that CDC promotes positive conservation management within these corridors to maximise their contribution to maintaining and enhancing biodiversity. As stated in Section 5.66, 'These corridors do not stop at the plan area boundaries.' Thus, it is recommended that CDC works in partnership with Chichester Harbour Conservancy and The South Downs National Park Authority to ensure that these Strategic Wildlife Corridors continue to provide effective corridors and connectivity across the wider landscape.

Section 5.66 refers to four Strategic Wildlife Corridors connecting Chichester Harbour with the South Downs National Park but it is noted that there is no mention of the Strategic Wildlife Corridors to the east of Chichester which connect Pagham Harbour with the South Downs National Park (as seen in Policy Map S30b). It is also noted that the maps referred to in Section 5.66, Maps 5.1 & 5.2 are missing.

WSCC and CDC promoted a Mitigated Northern Route for the A27 at Chichester as the preferred option, subject to the inclusion of important mitigation measures that are needed to make the scheme acceptable in environmental terms and the 'full southern route' as a reasonable alternative. Both routes could impact on the identified Strategic Wildlife Corridors. As currently drafted, Policy S30 would seem to prevent a mitigated northern route from coming forward in the future. Therefore, the District Council should consider whether the policy is overly restrictive (for example should it refer to 'significant adverse impacts' or 'unacceptable adverse impacts'?) and how it would be applied if a northern route for A27 were to come forward in the future.


Policy S31: Wastewater Management and Water Quality
S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 3, this - Where appropriate, development should contribute to the delivery of identified actions to deliver infiltration reduction across the catchment. Where appropriate development should contribute to the delivery of identified actions to deliver a reduction in the level of infiltration of groundwater into the sewer system.


Policy AL1: Land West of Chichester
AL1 policy text requested additional bullet point as number 8 - Increase capacity to attenuate surface water on site, thereby reducing the discharge flows off the site below current rates and reducing the risk of flooding to residential areas downstream.

AL1 policy text requested additional bullet point under 15 as 15 b- Provide mitigation for any loss of watercourse habitat resulting from culverting for highway provision in the development;

AL1 policy text in supporting 'improved cycle and pedestrian routes linking the site with the city, Fishbourne and the South Downs National Park', a new key link for cycling will be to Salthill Road, thereby enabling cyclists to benefit from the existing bridge crossing of the A27 for journeys to and from the west.


AL2: Land at Shopwyke (Oving Parish)
The policy acknowledges need 'for foot/cycle bridge across A27 to Coach Road'. There is also need for equestrian users to cross the A27 and WSCC PROW has received several enquiries seeking support for such infrastructure. Consideration could be given to the proposed bridge providing for all three modes.


AL3: East of Chichester (Oving Parish)
AL3 supporting text requested amendments underlined for paragraph 6.22 - The site is identified for 600 dwellings, however, there may be potential to deliver a large strategic development of 1000 dwellings, subject to further evidence, including the testing of additional growth on the local highway network and capacity of the site to provide flood risk attenuation for the increased housing density. The site should be master planned as a whole, and delivered through a phased development over a ten year period. Although the site is physically separated from the city by the A27 Chichester Bypass, the development should form a planned extension to the city, forming a new neighbourhood. This will involve opportunities to provide new facilities to serve the wider local community with good off-site access, particularly by walking and cycling to existing local facilities and facilities in the city.

AL3 policy requires exploring integrated green infrastructure with other strategic sites to the north east of the city, Tangmere and the wider countryside. It is considered that future residents will have expectations for provision of safe and convenient links towards Oving and also across the railway to link to the A259 cycle path and PROW south of the A259. It is considered that the policy should be strengthened to ensure such provision.


Policy AL4: Land at Westhampnett/North East Chichester
AL4 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 3 - Open space and green infrastructure, including a linear greenspace with public access along the Lavant Valley.

Taking into account the site-specific requirements, proposals for the site should satisfy the following requirements:

Policy AL4 policy, it is welcomed that 'provision should be made for green links to the South Downs National Park and Chichester City.' Safe and convenient walking and cycling to Lavant, from where people will access the South Downs, will provide for sustainable transport use.


Policy AL5 Southern Gateway
AL5 supporting text requested amendments underlined for paragraph 6.38 - The area has been identified as suitable for comprehensive regeneration with the aim being to make it a more attractive and welcoming gateway for the city, providing new housing, business and retail space and leisure and tourism facilities. Opportunities will be identified to improve transport links with a focus on cycling, walking and public transport and the removal of non-essential traffic from the area. There is also scope for significant public space enhancements and new landscaping incorporating blue / green infrastructure delivering multi-functional benefits.

AL5 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 5 - Provision of open space that:
* Is in accordance with Policy DM34, including retention of the existing playing pitch unless suitable re-provision is provided;
* Reinforces / enhances green and blue infrastructure consistent with Policy S29 and fully exploits the opportunities for sustainable drainage.


AL5 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 8 - Provision of both a surface and waste water management plan which demonstrates no net increase in flow to Apuldram Waste Water Treatment Works would result from this development, unless suitable alternative provision is agreed;


Policy AL6: Land South-West of Chichester (Apuldram and Donnington Parishes)
The LLFA has concerns regarding the lack of reference to flood risk constraints of the site in Policy AL6. There is reference to flood risk in paragraph 6.47. However, the policy itself makes no reference to these constraints.
The constraints arise from a combination of the following:

* Current tidal /fluvial flood risk extending from Chichester harbour to the west and up the River Lavant floodplain; (Map 1)
* Future tidal /fluvial flood risk associated with climate change; (Map 1)
* Constraints on infiltration of surface water run off because of high seasonal groundwater levels (<0.025m below the surface) (Map 2); and
* Constraints on gravity outfalls because of the low relief and long-term reduction in tidal window for discharge.

The above limits the options for how the site can be effectively drained without a step change from typically employed methods to embrace more innovative and currently expensive options e.g. blue roofs and rainwater harvesting.

The LLFA recommends that the policy sets out both the above constraints and the type of innovative drainage that will be required to achieve the development objectives for the site.



Key: Projected medium projection extent of SLR based upon 4m contour

AL6 extent

Current Flood Zone 3 extent.

Current Areas of high (1:30) surface water flood risk

Map 1 Existing and projected Tidal and surface water flood risk for AL6.

Consistent with paragraph 3.2 of the SFRA, given the high risk of flooding both now and into the future for this site, it is recommended that CDC gives consideration to the climate change maps to understand how the flood zones are predicted to change over the lifetime of the development.


Key:
AL6 boundary.

Groundwater levels are either at very near (within 0.025m of) the ground surface.

Groundwater levels are between 0.025m and 0.5m below the ground surface

Map 2 Groundwater flood risk JBA

Policy AL6 WSCC PROW considers 'necessary highway improvements to adequately mitigate the likely impacts on the highway network' to include a bridge crossing of the A27 for convenient walking and cycling access to the Terminus Road industrial estate and the city. There is an existing public footpath but, as this crosses the A27 at-grade, this will not provide the safest facility and not encourage people to minimise use of vehicles for local access. Provision of a bridge and access through the site could also establish a valuable link to the popular Salterns Way walking and cycle path. An additional link to Salterns Way should also be provided off the A286 for the benefit of Stockbridge residents as a safer alternative to the A286.


AL 7 Highgrove Farm, Bosham
The LLFA notes that the above site has the potential for a moderate risk of groundwater flooding. It is likely that this is perched groundwater draining from higher ground / springs to the north that lies in the superficial mixed sediments underlain by Lambeth Clay.


Policy AL8: East Wittering Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The policy requires 'Opportunities ... for the expansion and provision of green infrastructure into the wider countryside including between settlements and facilities'. Existing and future residents and the local visitor economy would benefit by delivery of an off-road route for walkers, cyclists and horse riders to and from the Medmerry development and towards Selsey. It is considered that Policy AL8 should aim to deliver this enhancement specifically.


Policy AL9: Fishbourne Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

It is considered that off-road cycling links to land West of Chichester (off Salthill Road) and to Bosham (off Park Lane) would benefit this community with enhanced sustainable connectivity.


Policy AL10: Chidham and Hambrook Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The policy requires 'opportunities' to develop green infrastructure and links to other communities. An opportunity, in conjunction with Highways England, exists to maximise the value of existing infrastructure by creating a new bridleway (for walkers, cyclists and horse riders) on a path using an existing A27 overbridge.


Policy AL11: Hunston Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The village is already well connected for walkers to access the surrounding countryside but there are presently no local cycling or horse riding facilities on the PROW network. A bridleway link to South Mundham (with the potential for future cycle links to Pagham and towards Bognor Regis) and to Sidlesham via the golf course and Brimfast Lane would provide residents and visitors with improved access to the countryside and services.


Policy AL12: Land North of Park Farm, Selsey
It is unclear why the policy map shows the proposed strategic allocation lies outside of the Neighbourhood Plan proposed settlement boundary. Some explanation for this anomaly would be helpful in the text.


Groundwater flood risk as depicted by JBA mapping (Brown = seasonal groundwater level lies between 0.025 and 0.5m below the surface).

The principle concern that the LLFA wishes to highlight is the need to ensure that the necessary foul sewerage infrastructure to support development is in place. It is the LLFA understanding that the Siddlesham WWTW experiences capacity issues currently, in part exacerbated by groundwater infiltration. While Policy AL12 states: Development proposals will need to demonstrate that sufficient capacity will be available within the sewer network, including waste water treatment works, to accommodate the proposed development in accordance with Policy S31.

The policy proposes only to provide 'pedestrian links between the site and new development south of Park Lane'. It is considered that cycling links should also be provided.


Policy DM8: Transport, Accessibility and Parking
The PROW network can provide vital means for communities to interact and encourage sustainable local access. The policy requirement to create 'links between new development and existing pedestrian, cycle and public transport networks' is welcomed. However, establishing links into surrounding existing development should not be overlooked also - the greater the permeability, the greater the use.


Policy DM10: New Employment Sites
Whilst mentioned earlier in the Plan in respect of a number of specific sites, this policy should specifically aim to provide, as a matter of course, suitable walking and cycling infrastructure to encourage local sustainable access. This infrastructure may need to extend outside a site boundary so as to provide safe and convenient connection to existing infrastructure. This principle should apply also to Policy DM13: Built Tourist and Leisure Development and Policy DM14: Caravan and Camping Sites.


Policy DM32: Green Infrastructure
Whilst it is recognised the policy proposes support subject to not 'dissect[ing] ... the linear network of cycle ways, public rights of way, bridleways ...', the policy could lend support to establishing new routes as part of the Green Infrastructure network itself.


Policy DM35: Equestrian Development
It is appreciated why the Plan would wish to require future equine development to be 'well related to or has improved links to the existing bridleway network'. However, this will add to the pressure of use on the existing bridleway network, which is not extensive outside of the South Downs, so will increase degradation of paths. Future developments must, therefore, accept to contribute in some way, acceptable to the local highway authority, to mitigate the additional impact to be created so all lawful users are not disadvantaged.


Policy DM29: Biodiversity
The measures to safeguard and enhance the biodiversity value of development sites are welcomed, including seeking net biodiversity gain.


Schedule of proposed changes to the policies map
S30a West of City Corridors -suggest title should be West of City Strategic Wildlife Corridors (to match S30b: East of City Strategic Wildlife Corridors. The Strategic Wildlife Corridors are depicted in different colour patterns on the two plans which is somewhat confusing.


Strategic Wildlife Corridors Local Plan Review Background Paper
Proposed Hermitage to Westbourne Strategic Wildlife Corridor
A large area depicted as Biodiversity Opportunity Area (BOA) in Fig. 1 (immediately to the south of the Rivers Ems & Meadows Local Wildlife Site, Westbourne) is in fact housing and forms part of the settlement of Westbourne. You should consider if this land should be included as having potential for biodiversity enhancement.


Glossary
Includes Sites of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCIs) but not Local Wildlife Sites (LWSs). SNCIs are now known as LWSs.

Attachments:

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2139

Received: 15/02/2019

Respondent: West Sussex County Council

Representation Summary:

Amend wording to
Taking into account the site-specific requirements, proposals for the site should satisfy the following requirements:

Policy AL4 policy, it is welcomed that 'provision should be made for green links to the South Downs National Park and Chichester City.' Safe and convenient walking and cycling to Lavant, from where people will access the South Downs, will provide for sustainable transport use.

Full text:

West Sussex County Council Officer Level Response
Introduction
The Chichester Local Plan Review Preferred Approach sets out how the future development in the District will be shaped, excluding the area within the South Downs National Park, up to 2035. It includes the overall development strategy as well as relevant strategic policies to meet the future needs of the area and development management policies to help guide development over the plan period. The Local Plan helps to:
* choose where the development goes;
* protect the character and beauty of the area;
* provide job and housing opportunities so that children can continue to work and live locally;
* support and help to boost the local economy;
* help residents to maintain healthy and active lifestyles; and,
* make sure that there is adequate services, travel options and community facilities.

The Chichester Local Plan was adopted in July 2015. At that time, the Local Plan was approved, but the Government Inspector said that it had to be reviewed again within five years, to make sure that sufficient housing was planned to meet the needs of the area.

The first part of the review process was carried out in June 2017 with an Issues and Options consultation, in which comments were invited regarding the overall development strategy and possible development locations. The Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach is the second stage of the process. It sets out the proposed development strategy and policies for the area to meet future needs.


West Sussex County Council Officer Level Comments
This note sets out West Sussex County Council's (WSCC) officer response to the consultation on the draft Chichester Local Plan Review Preferred Approach. It highlights key issues and suggested changes to which Chichester District Council (CDC) is requested to give consideration. We will continue to work with CDC in preparation of the Local Plan Review and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan regarding WSCC service requirements in order to mitigate planned development.


Minerals and Waste
A steady and adequate supply of minerals and the achievement of sustainable waste management can help to achieve a District or Borough Council's goals in relation to the economy, housing, transport, communications, strategic infrastructure and the environment. Therefore, District and Borough Local Plans should recognise the importance of minerals and waste issues as relevant to the scope of their overall strategies.

We welcome the reference to the adopted Minerals and Waste Local Plans and safeguarding in the document and the requirements in policies where a site is located within a minerals safeguarding area, or near to a safeguarded waste site. There are some missing references to safeguarding of minerals and waste sites for some of the proposed allocations, set out below and request that these references are added. It is also requested that 'Joint' is added into the references for the Joint Minerals Local Plan through the document.

Policy W23 of the Waste Local Plan applies to all Districts & Boroughs, regarding waste management within development and should be referenced in the Chichester Local Plan Review.

AL3 East of Chichester
The site is to the north of the Fuel Depot site allocation in the Waste Local Plan (Policy W10) for a built waste facility as part of a comprehensive redevelopment of the site (including complimentary non-waste uses). The East of Chichester allocation is the land to the north, bisected by the railway line, of the Fuel Depot. Reference should be made to giving consideration to the allocation, and therefore its safeguarding.

AL4 Westhampnett/North East Chichester
Reference should be made to minerals safeguarding, for consistency with other allocations, as within the sharp sand and gravel safeguarding area.

AL5 Southern Gateway
Reference should be made to the mineral infrastructure safeguarding policy M10 as within 200m of the Chichester Railhead.

AL6 South-West of Chichester
Reference should be made to the mineral infrastructure safeguarding policy M10 as within 300m of the Chichester Railhead.

AL7 Highgrove Farm Bosham
Remove reference to minerals safeguarding as the site is not within the safeguarding or consultation area.

AL12 Park Farm Selsey
Reference should be made to minerals safeguarding as site is within the sharp sand and gravel safeguarding area.

Neighbourhood plan allocations
Sites are yet to be allocated though neighbourhood plans. It is considered that the Joint Minerals Local Plan and Waste Local Plan are referenced, particularly with regards to safeguarding policies (M9, M10 and W2) and these documents and policies are given detailed consideration when allocating sites. Development at, adjacent or proximal to existing waste or mineral sites / infrastructure should be the subject to consultation with WSCC.


Connectivity and Sustainable Travel
The County council has worked with the District Council on the preparation of the transport evidence base study undertaken by Peter Brett Associates for the District Council. The recommended transport mitigation strategy, as assessed using the Chichester Area Transport Model has been demonstrated to be capable in principle to prevent the development from resulting in severe residual cumulative impacts on the highways and transport network. However, the recommended strategy has several risks to deliverability and acceptability associated with it, which require further work to be undertaken to demonstrate that the strategy can be implemented in its current form to provide the forecasted mitigation to travel conditions.

There are three locations where new highway alignments are proposed outside of existing highways boundaries. Two of these may include significant earthworks or structures to be delivered, being Stockbridge Link Road and Terminus Road diversion. The cost of the mitigation strategy exceeds a figure which could reasonably be supported by the value of the proposed development developer contributions alone, therefore the delivery of the strategy will depend upon securing of external grant funding to top up developer contributions. WSCC will work with the District Council in supporting and or applying for funding, the District Council needing to secure Highways England to support funding applications for A27 improvements. The proposed junction designs for the A27 Stockbridge and Whyke roundabouts include bans to well used right turn movements off the Chichester A27 bypass which result in significant forecast changes to traffic flows on local roads in the south of Chichester and on the Manhood Peninsular.

There is a need to ensure the land outside the highway boundary is available and the plan should set out how this land will be acquired to deliver the measures, it may be that a commitment to use, if required, and therefore reference to CPO be made in the policy.

Funding for the mitigation strategy is uncertain. It is considered that the Plan should set out how it will deal with this uncertainty. This could include trigger points in the monitoring framework to trigger a change of approach or alternative options to deliver the required development.

These factors mean that feasibility work is necessary to be undertaken prior to Plan submission, to reduce as far as practicable risks to costs, land take, impacts and deliverability of the proposed transport strategy in order to show that the strategy can be implemented within the plan period and that the funding strategy will be sufficient to meet the design requirements. In particular the following will need to be addressed:

* Statutory undertakers equipment under the roads junctions to be impacted.
* Extent of earthworks required to create a vertical and horizontal alignment compliant with design standards. Design audit to identify any required departures from standard.
* Designing for drainage and flooding issues, including compliance with the WSCC LLFA Policy for the Management of Surface Water, November 2018.
* Designs for structures to cross watercourses - Stockbridge Link Road
* Design should include suitable provision for rights of way and footway crossings
* Scoping for whether and at what level further Environmental Impact Assessment will be required.
* Stage 1 Road safety Audit, designers response report and resulting amendments to designs.
* Land take required after feasibility level designs have been developed and availability of required land.
* Wophams Lane - impacts of forecast changes to flow patterns to take B2201 southbound traffic on requirements for highway width, alignment, footway provision and junctions with A286 Birdham Road and B2201 Selsey Road; design solution required.
* Quarry Lane, Kingsham Avenue /Road, Terminus Road; impacts of forecast flow changes on highway users, residential and commercial frontagers and measures to manage through traffic whilst maintaining local access

Sustainable transport measures will also be required to mitigate planned development. These will be identified through more detailed assessments of sites including pre-application consideration. Funding will need to be identified through development and other sources as well in some cases.

Public Rights of Way
There is support for the Local Plan Review's approach to Public Rights Of Way (PROW), not just for the potential to impact on existing public off-road access but also the opportunity it brings to enhance this access for the benefit of future residents, communities and visitors. PROW deliver benefits for personal health and wellbeing; sustainable transport; reduction of air pollution and road congestion; are able to support local economies; and they connect communities.
WSCC PROW welcomes several aspects of the Vision statement, which give support to the protection and enhancement of the PROW network, and provision of safe and convenient off-road access opportunities for residents and visitors:

* Pursue a healthy lifestyle and benefit from a sense of well-being supported by good access to education, health, leisure, open space and nature, sports and other essential facilities;
* Live in sustainable neighbourhoods supported by necessary infrastructure and facilities;
* Move around safely and conveniently with opportunities to choose alternatives to car travel.

The Local Plan Strategic Objectives offer further support to enhance off-road access, particularly to 'Encourage healthy and active lifestyles for all, developing accessible health and leisure facilities and linked green spaces'. However, the objective to 'Achieve a sustainable and integrated transport system through improved cycling networks and links to public transport' should recognise walking also as an important mode for many people; some strategic enhancements will significantly improve walkers' safety and convenience.

It is considered that West of Chichester the A259 could act as a corridor for increased volumes of non-motorised access, particularly cycling. Improvement of the existing on-road facility and development of a various 'feeder' routes to connect with the many settlements, perhaps using quiet lanes in places, would encourage cycling particularly to be a natural alternative to vehicle use. Policy S18: Integrated Coastal Zone Management for the Manhood Peninsula, gives regard to such an ambition in stating it will 'Improve infrastructure to support sustainable modes of transport, especially cycle ways, bridleways and footpaths, including the National Coastal Footpath'.

The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) Open Space and Recreation, para 97b) states:
the loss resulting from the proposed development would be replaced by equivalent or better provision in terms of quantity and quality in a suitable location.
The NPPF para 98 also states:
Planning policies and decisions should protect and enhance public rights of way and access, including taking opportunities to provide better facilities for users, for example by adding links to existing rights of way networks including National Trails.'
There is support for Policy S20: Design, that recognises these requirements in stating development 'is well connected to provide safe and convenient ease of movement by all users, prioritising pedestrian and cycle movements both within the scheme and neighbouring areas and ensuring that the needs of vehicular traffic does not dominate at the expense of other modes of transport, or undermine the resulting quality of places' and 'incorporates and/or links to high quality Green Infrastructure and landscaping to enhance biodiversity and meet recreational needs, including public rights of way'.


Education
As the local education authority, WSCC has the statutory duty to ensure that there is a sufficient supply of suitable school places to meet statutory requirements for early years, primary, secondary and sixth form provision (including up to age 25 for those with special educational needs and/or disabilities). Education infrastructure, or contributions to provide infrastructure, will be required in order to mitigate proposed development. We will continue to work with CDC in preparation of the Local Plan Review and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan regarding education and other service requirements in order to mitigate planned development.

The table below sets out the primary, secondary school and sixth form requirements to mitigate proposed development. SEE ATTACHMENT FOR TABLE

AL1 Land West of Chichester

It should be noted that phase one of this development will provide the primary school with the core of the building being built to the specification for a 2 form entry (FE) school and 1FE teaching accommodation. Phase 2 as per 6.10 on page 93 should include expansion of the primary school for the further 1FE of teaching accommodation.

AL2 Land at Shopwhyke (Oving Parish)

No update to original response for this allocation is required.

AL3 Land East of Chichester - previously South of Shopwhyke

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there is insufficient space within the primary schools that serve this proposed development. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Land for a 1 FE expandable to 2FE and pro rata share of the build costs would be required.

If numbers were to increase on the east side of the city, education provision will need to be reviewed, potentially a further 1FE may be required including land provision, this could be in the form of an expansion or a new school being built capable of expansion to 3FE.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL4 Land at Westhampnett / North East Chichester

The remaining 200 dwellings will impact on the education provision in the area, financial contributions towards expansion of existing or pro rata costs towards the expansion of the school within AL3.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL5 Southern Gateway

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from the strategic allocation of 350 dwellings in the Southern Gateway. However, consideration should be given to the cumulative impact of housing in the area Land South West of Chichester (AL6) to allocate land within the area for a 1FE expandable to 2FE primary school. Pro rata financial contributions towards the build costs would be sought from developers to mitigate their impact.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL6 Land South West of Chichester (Apuldram & Donnington Parishes)

It should be noted that the primary education provision in this area is either in Chichester City Centre which means crossing the main A27 or by travelling south towards the peninsula. Consideration should be given to the cumulative impact of further housing in the area along with the Southern Gateway allocation (AL5) to allocate land within the strategic allocation site for a 1FE expandable to 2FE primary school. Pro rata financial contributions towards the build costs would be sought from developers to mitigate their impact.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for sixth form pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of the provision if feasible and required.

AL7 Bosham

The current primary provision serving the area is at capacity, expansion of the school on its existing site is not possible. As part of the strategic allocation, it is proposed that land for a 2FE primary school be provided. The strategic allocation of 250 dwellings in isolation does not require a new school to be built. Certainty over the land allocation and sufficient funding will be key drivers in realising this proposal.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL9 Fishbourne

The primary school serving the area is currently at capacity, expansion of the school may be possible, feasibility / options appraisals would need to be undertaken.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of primary and secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

AL8 East Wittering

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development.

Contributions would be required for expansion of primary and secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL10 Chidham and Hambrook area

The current primary provision serving the area is at capacity, expansion of the school on its existing site is not possible. As part of the strategic allocation, it is proposed that land for a 2FE primary school be provided. Certainty over the land allocation and sufficient funding will be key drivers in realising this proposal.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL11 Hunston

Any development within this area cannot currently be accommodated in the existing primary school at North Mundham. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development, CDC will need to work with WSCC to determine how additional capacity in the area could be accommodated if land is to be allocated.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

AL12 Selsey

Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Contributions (and possibly land if required) would be sought to meet the pupil product from the development in the most appropriate form once this can be clarified.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL13 Southbourne

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there is insufficient space within the primary schools that serve this proposed development. Further capacity would be required to accommodate the development. Land for a 2form entry expandable to 3FE primary school and pro rata share of the build costs would be required.

AL7, AL10 and AL13 are all within the same school planning area, the cumulative total of the strategic allocations brings forward a requirement for c3 forms of entry additional school places. The Local Plan, as currently drafted, indicates an oversupply of school places which could affect the viability of all the schools in the planning area.

Expansion of the secondary school may be possible. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools if feasible and required.

AL14 Tangmere

The current allocation of 1,300 dwellings will bring forward the requirement for land for a 1FE expandable to 2FE and financial contributions would be sought to meet the pupil product from the development in the most appropriate form once this can be clarified.

At the current time pupil place planning indicates that there would be sufficient space or expansion capacity to accommodate the child product from this proposed development for secondary aged pupils. Contributions would be required for expansion of secondary schools and sixth form if feasible and required.

Footnote: - if all of the proposed sites were to come forward the secondary school and sixth form provision would be full in the Chichester Planning Area. Expansion of the secondary schools in the Chichester Planning Area to cater for the increased demand would need to be sought from the academy sponsors, where appropriate and the Local Authority.


Lead Local Flood Authority
The Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA) is concerned about the approach being taken with regard to ensuring potential wastewater treatment for proposed new sustainable development.

Paragraph 8 of the NPPF states:
8. Achieving sustainable development means that the planning system has three overarching objectives, which are interdependent and need to be pursued in mutually supportive ways (so that opportunities can be taken to secure net gains across each of the different objectives):

a) An economic objective - to help build a strong, responsive and competitive
economy, by ensuring that sufficient land of the right types is available in the
right places and at the right time to support growth, innovation and improved
productivity; and by identifying and coordinating the provision of infrastructure;

Paragraph 20 of the NPPF states:
20. Strategic policies should set out an overall strategy for the pattern, scale and quality of development, and make sufficient provision for:
a) housing (including affordable housing), employment, retail, leisure and other commercial development;
b) infrastructure for transport, telecommunications, security, waste management, water supply, wastewater, flood risk and coastal change management, and the provision of minerals and energy (including heat);

In the LLFAs view, the Local Plan Review is not setting out an overall strategy for the pattern, scale and quality of development in relation to arrangements for wastewater management. The LLFA considers that CDC needs to go further in incorporating within the Local Plan Review how this provision is being made.


Additional Policy Comments

Policy S12: Infrastructure Provision
Support the requirement that all development must provide or fund new infrastructure, facilities and services required, both on and off-site (including full fibre communications infrastructure) as a consequence of the proposal. The explicit reference to full fibre communications infrastructure is supported as this will provide gigabit-capable and future-proofed services to all development, existing and new. The reference to provision of facilities and services on and off-site is also supported as in the case of broadband for example, all development will be adequately equipped with the necessary infrastructure installed for the purposes of connecting to full fibre gigabit-capable broadband services. This policy supports the County Council's aim for increased digital infrastructure that will provide for gigabit-capable broadband and future technologies such as 5G.

Support the reference to safeguarding educational facilities under section 3 of the policy.

The policy includes the requirement to 'Facilitate accessibility to facilities and services by a range of transport modes'. PROW can offer vital access means for walkers and cyclists, such as for employment land use (e.g. commuting by bicycle) and in support of the high street, both for employees and customers. IT is considered that this Policy, also Policy S13: Chichester City Development Principles, should aim to encourage such access to be the natural and preferred modes of access, thereby helping achieve the benefits previously described. It is noted Policy S14: Chichester City Transport Strategy, does acknowledge cycling and walking and lends support to their improvement.

The supporting text, paragraph 4.81 makes reference to the Strategic Infrastructure Package (SIP). It is requested that this wording is removed and replaced with West Sussex County Council identifies service infrastructure requirements necessary to support new and existing communities, where strategic development and growth is proposed in Local Plans. These are required to deliver the County Council's statutory responsibilities, strategic objectives and current policy and feed into the preparation of the Infrastructure Delivery Plan.


Policy S13: Chichester City Development Principles
This policy, like policy S12, it is considered should aim to encourage such access to be the natural and preferred modes of access, thereby helping achieve the benefits previously described. It is noted Policy S14: Chichester City Transport Strategy, does acknowledge cycling and walking and lends support to their improvement.


Policy S23: Transport and Accessibility
The policy and supporting text paragraphs 5.15 - 5.33 refer to Transport Infrastructure. Understandably much consideration is given to the A27 around Chichester; however, in addition to seeking new infrastructure from new development, it is recommended support in principle is given to maximising the value of existing infrastructure so as to facilitate off-road user modes accessing either side of the A27.


S24: Countryside
Supporting text paragraphs 5.34 - 5.43, acknowledges 'it is necessary to provide for the social and economic needs of small rural communities, and enable those who manage, live and work in the countryside to continue to do so'. It is recognised in para 7.205, supporting text to policy SM35 Equestrian Development, the high numbers of liveried and stabled horses. A considerable network of businesses are supported by such a high equine population, and in addition to financial value within the local community there is considerable benefit in terms of health and wellbeing of individuals. It is suggested that Policy S24: Countryside, could recognise this specifically.


S27: Flood Risk Management
Supporting text paragraph 5.54, requested amendments underlined - as a consequence of the rise in sea levels and storm surges, parts of the plan area will be at increased risk from coastal erosion, groundwater, fluvial and/or tidal flooding. Hard defences may not be possible to maintain in the long term, therefore development needs to be strongly restricted in areas at risk to flooding and erosion, whilst ensuring that existing towns and villages are protected by sustainable means that make space for water in suitable areas. Development must take account of the policies of the relevant shoreline management plan

Supporting text paragraph 5.58, requested amendments underlined - Built development can lead to increased surface water run-off; therefore new
development is encouraged to incorporate mitigation techniques in its design, such as permeable surfaces and Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS). Where appropriate, SuDS should be used as part of the linked green infrastructure network to provide multiple functions and benefits to landscape quality, recreation and biodiversity. This can be achieved through habitat creation, new open spaces and good design. SuDS should be designed to help cope with intense rainfall events and to overcome any deterioration in water quality status. In determining the suitability of SuDS for individual development sites, developers should refer to guidance published by the Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA): West Sussex LLFA Policy for the Management of Surface Water: https://www.westsussex.gov.uk/media/12230/ws_llfa_policy_for_management_of_surface_water.pdf and, if necessary, seek further advice from the Lead Local Flood Authority LLFA.

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 1 - a. through a sequential approach, taking into consideration all forms of flooding, it is located in the lowest appropriate flood risk location in accordance with the NPPF and the Chichester Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA); and

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 2. Sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) will be required on major developments (10 or more dwellings or equivalent) and encouraged for smaller schemes. SUDS should be designed into the landscape of all new development and should be included as part of a District wide approach to improve water quality and provide flood mitigation. A site-specific Flood Risk Assessment will be required for sites within or adjacent to areas at risk of surface water flooding as identified in the SFRA. There should be no increase in either the volume or rate of surface water runoff leaving the site.

S27 policy text requested additional bullet point as number 4 - Clear management arrangements and funding for their ongoing maintenance over the lifetime of the development should be proposed. Planning conditions and / or obligations will be used to secure these arrangements.

S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 2, but would be section 5 - Development should not result in any property or highway, on or off site, being at greater risk of flooding than the 1 in 100 year storm return period, including an allowance for climate change.


Policy S29: Green Infrastructure
The Green Infrastructure policy is welcomed, including provision of new Green Infrastructure as an integral part of the development at Strategic Development Locations. It is recommended that measures are put in place to secure the long term management of such Green Infrastructure.


Policy S30: Strategic Wildlife Corridors
The identification of Strategic Wildlife Corridors and inclusion of a policy to safeguard them from development is welcomed. It is recommended that CDC promotes positive conservation management within these corridors to maximise their contribution to maintaining and enhancing biodiversity. As stated in Section 5.66, 'These corridors do not stop at the plan area boundaries.' Thus, it is recommended that CDC works in partnership with Chichester Harbour Conservancy and The South Downs National Park Authority to ensure that these Strategic Wildlife Corridors continue to provide effective corridors and connectivity across the wider landscape.

Section 5.66 refers to four Strategic Wildlife Corridors connecting Chichester Harbour with the South Downs National Park but it is noted that there is no mention of the Strategic Wildlife Corridors to the east of Chichester which connect Pagham Harbour with the South Downs National Park (as seen in Policy Map S30b). It is also noted that the maps referred to in Section 5.66, Maps 5.1 & 5.2 are missing.

WSCC and CDC promoted a Mitigated Northern Route for the A27 at Chichester as the preferred option, subject to the inclusion of important mitigation measures that are needed to make the scheme acceptable in environmental terms and the 'full southern route' as a reasonable alternative. Both routes could impact on the identified Strategic Wildlife Corridors. As currently drafted, Policy S30 would seem to prevent a mitigated northern route from coming forward in the future. Therefore, the District Council should consider whether the policy is overly restrictive (for example should it refer to 'significant adverse impacts' or 'unacceptable adverse impacts'?) and how it would be applied if a northern route for A27 were to come forward in the future.


Policy S31: Wastewater Management and Water Quality
S27 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 3, this - Where appropriate, development should contribute to the delivery of identified actions to deliver infiltration reduction across the catchment. Where appropriate development should contribute to the delivery of identified actions to deliver a reduction in the level of infiltration of groundwater into the sewer system.


Policy AL1: Land West of Chichester
AL1 policy text requested additional bullet point as number 8 - Increase capacity to attenuate surface water on site, thereby reducing the discharge flows off the site below current rates and reducing the risk of flooding to residential areas downstream.

AL1 policy text requested additional bullet point under 15 as 15 b- Provide mitigation for any loss of watercourse habitat resulting from culverting for highway provision in the development;

AL1 policy text in supporting 'improved cycle and pedestrian routes linking the site with the city, Fishbourne and the South Downs National Park', a new key link for cycling will be to Salthill Road, thereby enabling cyclists to benefit from the existing bridge crossing of the A27 for journeys to and from the west.


AL2: Land at Shopwyke (Oving Parish)
The policy acknowledges need 'for foot/cycle bridge across A27 to Coach Road'. There is also need for equestrian users to cross the A27 and WSCC PROW has received several enquiries seeking support for such infrastructure. Consideration could be given to the proposed bridge providing for all three modes.


AL3: East of Chichester (Oving Parish)
AL3 supporting text requested amendments underlined for paragraph 6.22 - The site is identified for 600 dwellings, however, there may be potential to deliver a large strategic development of 1000 dwellings, subject to further evidence, including the testing of additional growth on the local highway network and capacity of the site to provide flood risk attenuation for the increased housing density. The site should be master planned as a whole, and delivered through a phased development over a ten year period. Although the site is physically separated from the city by the A27 Chichester Bypass, the development should form a planned extension to the city, forming a new neighbourhood. This will involve opportunities to provide new facilities to serve the wider local community with good off-site access, particularly by walking and cycling to existing local facilities and facilities in the city.

AL3 policy requires exploring integrated green infrastructure with other strategic sites to the north east of the city, Tangmere and the wider countryside. It is considered that future residents will have expectations for provision of safe and convenient links towards Oving and also across the railway to link to the A259 cycle path and PROW south of the A259. It is considered that the policy should be strengthened to ensure such provision.


Policy AL4: Land at Westhampnett/North East Chichester
AL4 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 3 - Open space and green infrastructure, including a linear greenspace with public access along the Lavant Valley.

Taking into account the site-specific requirements, proposals for the site should satisfy the following requirements:

Policy AL4 policy, it is welcomed that 'provision should be made for green links to the South Downs National Park and Chichester City.' Safe and convenient walking and cycling to Lavant, from where people will access the South Downs, will provide for sustainable transport use.


Policy AL5 Southern Gateway
AL5 supporting text requested amendments underlined for paragraph 6.38 - The area has been identified as suitable for comprehensive regeneration with the aim being to make it a more attractive and welcoming gateway for the city, providing new housing, business and retail space and leisure and tourism facilities. Opportunities will be identified to improve transport links with a focus on cycling, walking and public transport and the removal of non-essential traffic from the area. There is also scope for significant public space enhancements and new landscaping incorporating blue / green infrastructure delivering multi-functional benefits.

AL5 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 5 - Provision of open space that:
* Is in accordance with Policy DM34, including retention of the existing playing pitch unless suitable re-provision is provided;
* Reinforces / enhances green and blue infrastructure consistent with Policy S29 and fully exploits the opportunities for sustainable drainage.


AL5 policy text requested amendments underlined for section 8 - Provision of both a surface and waste water management plan which demonstrates no net increase in flow to Apuldram Waste Water Treatment Works would result from this development, unless suitable alternative provision is agreed;


Policy AL6: Land South-West of Chichester (Apuldram and Donnington Parishes)
The LLFA has concerns regarding the lack of reference to flood risk constraints of the site in Policy AL6. There is reference to flood risk in paragraph 6.47. However, the policy itself makes no reference to these constraints.
The constraints arise from a combination of the following:

* Current tidal /fluvial flood risk extending from Chichester harbour to the west and up the River Lavant floodplain; (Map 1)
* Future tidal /fluvial flood risk associated with climate change; (Map 1)
* Constraints on infiltration of surface water run off because of high seasonal groundwater levels (<0.025m below the surface) (Map 2); and
* Constraints on gravity outfalls because of the low relief and long-term reduction in tidal window for discharge.

The above limits the options for how the site can be effectively drained without a step change from typically employed methods to embrace more innovative and currently expensive options e.g. blue roofs and rainwater harvesting.

The LLFA recommends that the policy sets out both the above constraints and the type of innovative drainage that will be required to achieve the development objectives for the site.



Key: Projected medium projection extent of SLR based upon 4m contour

AL6 extent

Current Flood Zone 3 extent.

Current Areas of high (1:30) surface water flood risk

Map 1 Existing and projected Tidal and surface water flood risk for AL6.

Consistent with paragraph 3.2 of the SFRA, given the high risk of flooding both now and into the future for this site, it is recommended that CDC gives consideration to the climate change maps to understand how the flood zones are predicted to change over the lifetime of the development.


Key:
AL6 boundary.

Groundwater levels are either at very near (within 0.025m of) the ground surface.

Groundwater levels are between 0.025m and 0.5m below the ground surface

Map 2 Groundwater flood risk JBA

Policy AL6 WSCC PROW considers 'necessary highway improvements to adequately mitigate the likely impacts on the highway network' to include a bridge crossing of the A27 for convenient walking and cycling access to the Terminus Road industrial estate and the city. There is an existing public footpath but, as this crosses the A27 at-grade, this will not provide the safest facility and not encourage people to minimise use of vehicles for local access. Provision of a bridge and access through the site could also establish a valuable link to the popular Salterns Way walking and cycle path. An additional link to Salterns Way should also be provided off the A286 for the benefit of Stockbridge residents as a safer alternative to the A286.


AL 7 Highgrove Farm, Bosham
The LLFA notes that the above site has the potential for a moderate risk of groundwater flooding. It is likely that this is perched groundwater draining from higher ground / springs to the north that lies in the superficial mixed sediments underlain by Lambeth Clay.


Policy AL8: East Wittering Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The policy requires 'Opportunities ... for the expansion and provision of green infrastructure into the wider countryside including between settlements and facilities'. Existing and future residents and the local visitor economy would benefit by delivery of an off-road route for walkers, cyclists and horse riders to and from the Medmerry development and towards Selsey. It is considered that Policy AL8 should aim to deliver this enhancement specifically.


Policy AL9: Fishbourne Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

It is considered that off-road cycling links to land West of Chichester (off Salthill Road) and to Bosham (off Park Lane) would benefit this community with enhanced sustainable connectivity.


Policy AL10: Chidham and Hambrook Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The policy requires 'opportunities' to develop green infrastructure and links to other communities. An opportunity, in conjunction with Highways England, exists to maximise the value of existing infrastructure by creating a new bridleway (for walkers, cyclists and horse riders) on a path using an existing A27 overbridge.


Policy AL11: Hunston Parish
Due to no information on where housing is going to be located so the LLFA is not in a position to comment on proposed housing allocation sites at this stage.

The village is already well connected for walkers to access the surrounding countryside but there are presently no local cycling or horse riding facilities on the PROW network. A bridleway link to South Mundham (with the potential for future cycle links to Pagham and towards Bognor Regis) and to Sidlesham via the golf course and Brimfast Lane would provide residents and visitors with improved access to the countryside and services.


Policy AL12: Land North of Park Farm, Selsey
It is unclear why the policy map shows the proposed strategic allocation lies outside of the Neighbourhood Plan proposed settlement boundary. Some explanation for this anomaly would be helpful in the text.


Groundwater flood risk as depicted by JBA mapping (Brown = seasonal groundwater level lies between 0.025 and 0.5m below the surface).

The principle concern that the LLFA wishes to highlight is the need to ensure that the necessary foul sewerage infrastructure to support development is in place. It is the LLFA understanding that the Siddlesham WWTW experiences capacity issues currently, in part exacerbated by groundwater infiltration. While Policy AL12 states: Development proposals will need to demonstrate that sufficient capacity will be available within the sewer network, including waste water treatment works, to accommodate the proposed development in accordance with Policy S31.

The policy proposes only to provide 'pedestrian links between the site and new development south of Park Lane'. It is considered that cycling links should also be provided.


Policy DM8: Transport, Accessibility and Parking
The PROW network can provide vital means for communities to interact and encourage sustainable local access. The policy requirement to create 'links between new development and existing pedestrian, cycle and public transport networks' is welcomed. However, establishing links into surrounding existing development should not be overlooked also - the greater the permeability, the greater the use.


Policy DM10: New Employment Sites
Whilst mentioned earlier in the Plan in respect of a number of specific sites, this policy should specifically aim to provide, as a matter of course, suitable walking and cycling infrastructure to encourage local sustainable access. This infrastructure may need to extend outside a site boundary so as to provide safe and convenient connection to existing infrastructure. This principle should apply also to Policy DM13: Built Tourist and Leisure Development and Policy DM14: Caravan and Camping Sites.


Policy DM32: Green Infrastructure
Whilst it is recognised the policy proposes support subject to not 'dissect[ing] ... the linear network of cycle ways, public rights of way, bridleways ...', the policy could lend support to establishing new routes as part of the Green Infrastructure network itself.


Policy DM35: Equestrian Development
It is appreciated why the Plan would wish to require future equine development to be 'well related to or has improved links to the existing bridleway network'. However, this will add to the pressure of use on the existing bridleway network, which is not extensive outside of the South Downs, so will increase degradation of paths. Future developments must, therefore, accept to contribute in some way, acceptable to the local highway authority, to mitigate the additional impact to be created so all lawful users are not disadvantaged.


Policy DM29: Biodiversity
The measures to safeguard and enhance the biodiversity value of development sites are welcomed, including seeking net biodiversity gain.


Schedule of proposed changes to the policies map
S30a West of City Corridors -suggest title should be West of City Strategic Wildlife Corridors (to match S30b: East of City Strategic Wildlife Corridors. The Strategic Wildlife Corridors are depicted in different colour patterns on the two plans which is somewhat confusing.


Strategic Wildlife Corridors Local Plan Review Background Paper
Proposed Hermitage to Westbourne Strategic Wildlife Corridor
A large area depicted as Biodiversity Opportunity Area (BOA) in Fig. 1 (immediately to the south of the Rivers Ems & Meadows Local Wildlife Site, Westbourne) is in fact housing and forms part of the settlement of Westbourne. You should consider if this land should be included as having potential for biodiversity enhancement.


Glossary
Includes Sites of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCIs) but not Local Wildlife Sites (LWSs). SNCIs are now known as LWSs.

Attachments:

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2191

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Debbie Leonard

Representation Summary:

AL4 the land proposed for removal should not be removed as a strategic employment site and should be included in the plan as any development will not be affected by the noise buffer and will not contribute to further light and other pollution not currently present at this commercial site. The settlement to the north should be extended to accommodate the unmet housing need as an exemption site for affordable homes 100% within 5 miles of the need as required in statute (unless the unmet housing need is returned to SDNP as it should be).

Full text:

S16 Goodwood buffer and adjoining land to be made a strategic site for employment space as not affected by noise pollution and will not contribute further to noise pollution.

S30a & S30b are draft corridors as the biodiversity study is incomplete at the time of this consultation and will need to be re-consulted on.
Al 1 is incomplete as presented. The settlement boundary should extend to include sites to the North to accommodate the unmet housing need as an exemption site for affordable homes 100% within 5 miles of the need as required in statute (unless the unmet housing need is returned to SDNP as it should be).
AL4 the land proposed for removal should not be removed as a strategic employment site and should be included in the plan as any development will not be affected by the noise buffer and will not contribute to further light and other pollution not currently present at this commercial site. The settlement to the north should be extended as per statements in AL1
AL 6 is wholly inappropriate for development:
It affects the AONB on its border including the following:
There will be increased light pollution and noise pollution, waste water issues and habitat risk.
The only view of cathedral from the sea will be lost.
This is a flood plain and is therefore totally unsuitable for residential property.
Green buffer between Chichester and Manhood-
If the proposed link road goes ahead, the views of cathedral framed by South Downs will be lost.
Traffic congestion onto the Fishbourne roundabout moves pollution and provides absolutely no purpose and is a ruse to get option 2 delivered with no evidence of being supported by HE as there is no indication of a consultation.

Whilst there is a movement away from car use and getting both adults and children to use bicycles for transport and fitness the important, safe and tourist attracting cycle path of Salterns Way will be lost.
Requirement for infrastructure (schools) which can be met with development in North with 100% exception site to meet unmet housing need of SDNP.
The employment space is in a flood plain

This Policy is insufficiently developed to be meaningful. There is nothing in the Evidence Base (as at the last afternoon for public consultation) in relation to "the forthcoming Chichester Vision - Transport Feasibility Study", which means that no-one taking part in this consultation can be expected to know what this Policy S14 means!
This Policy is crucial to the Plan's Strategic Objectives, including for "safe, clean" communities and Health and Well-Being, as well as Environment. I strongly object to it being brought forward for consultation without adequate detail. This aspect of the Plan should be re-opened for public consultation when CDC can evidence the aforementioned Transport Feasibility Study and respondents are able to consider the full picture. SB1 map should include an employment space and residential strategic site as an exception site for the SDNP unmet housing need. South and east of Goodwood is an ideal site for employment space and then the areas South of Lavant outside the SDNP to be inserted as a strategic site for 100% affordable homes (exception) to meet the unmet need from SDNP.

The decisions on Chichester's housing, roads, employment areas and the infrastructure to support all of these cannot be done piecemeal. The various proposed housing developments, green living and areas such as Southern gate will all be affected by the roads, these issues all need to be discussed and formed as one overall, if longterm, development plan.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2264

Received: 01/02/2019

Respondent: Historic England

Representation Summary:

Historic England makes no comment on the principle of the two sites.

The site abuts the Graylingwell Hospital Conservation Area, the buildings of the former 'pauper lunatic asylum' (including the Grade II listed chapel), the Grade II listed Summersdale Farmhouse and a Grade II registered park and garden.

Criterion 9 provides adequate protection for designated assets.

This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.

Full text:

Paragraph 1.5 of the Local Plan Review states "This Plan seeks to balance the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development". "Balance" implies some gains and some losses. However, this does not reflect the four bullet points that follow this sentence.
In addition, Paragraph 8 of the National Planning Policy Framework explains that;
"Achieving sustainable development means that the planning system has three overarching objectives, which are interdependent and need to be pursued in mutually supportive ways (so that opportunities can be taken to secure net gains across each of the different objectives)".

We therefore suggest that "balance" is not the most appropriate word.

The three overarching objectives include; "c) an environmental objective - to contribute to protecting and enhancing our natural, built and historic environment......". We therefore welcome the fourth bullet point of paragraph 1.5; "Protecting and enhancing the unique and special qualities of our environment".

Reword the first sentence of paragraph 1.5 as; "This Plan seeks to deliver the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development in mutually supportive ways".

Paragraph 1.16 explains that the National Planning Policy Framework reiterates the importance of significantly boosting the supply of new dwellings, whilst ensuring provision for other development needs including economic growth.
Whilst not untrue, we consider that this does not fully represent the Government's objectives and policies as set out in the Framework and therefore gives the misleading impression that the Framework is only about housing supply and economic development.
In fact, the protection and enhancement of the natural, built and historic environment is also identified as important in the Framework e.g. in the environmental overarching objective for the planning system as set out in paragraphs 8, 11b)i and 20 d).
Reword the final sentence of paragraph 1.16 as:
"The importance of significantly boosting the supply of new dwellings is reiterated, whilst ensuring provision for other development needs including economic growth and protecting and enhancing the natural, built and historic environment".
Paragraph 31 of the National Planning Policy Framework requires "The preparation and review of all policies should be underpinned by relevant and up-to-date evidence". We previously expressed our concerns about the historic evidence base for the policy framework for the district when commenting on the Issues and Options stage of the Local Plan Review;
"We are aware of the Council's series of Conservation Area Character Appraisals, The Future Growth of Chichester Study and the Landscape Capacity Studies. However, the Council's "Supporting documents" webpage has no historic environment documents and we are not clear if the Council has other historic environment evidence e.g. is there an extensive urban survey of Chichester or other townscape or characterisation study ? Is there an urban archaeological database ? Is there a list of locally important heritage assets ? Has the Council undertaken a survey of grade II buildings at risk ?".
However, looking at the Council's Local Plan Review Preferred Approach Plan - Evidence Base - December 2018 webpage, the only specific historic environment evidence base document identified is the Chichester Historic Environment Strategy and Action Plan. Whilst we welcome the Strategy, we have previously expressed the view that we do not consider that it forms, by itself, an adequate historic environment evidence base for the Local Plan Review.
We are aware that the Council has a list of locally important buildings, but that Chichester was not covered by the West Sussex Extensive Historic Town Surveys - perhaps as it was thought a candidate for the more intensive approach of an Urban Archaeological Database (UAD). However, we are not aware that such a UAD exists, and whilst we are aware of the Council's Historic Environment Record (the availability of which accords with paragraph 187 of the National Planning Policy Framework), we do wonder if the archaeological evidence and significance of the city is fully understood and readily available. We suggested that the Historic Environment Strategy could set out actions to enhance understanding and management of the archaeological resource of the historic city and we would be pleased to discuss how we might be able to assist with this.
We will expect the Council to have an adequate, up-to-date and relevant historic environment evidence base and to demonstrate in the Pre-Submission Local Plan how that historic evidence base has informed and influenced the Plan's policies and site allocations.
The historic environment evidence base for the Local Plan Review should be set out on the Council's Evidence Base webpage. If there are indeed gaps in that evidence base, then these should be filled and that evidence taken on board in preparing the Pre-Submission Local Plan Review document.
Historic England welcomes and supports the reference to the historic environment of Chichester district, and the heritage assets therein, in paragraphs 2.27 and 2.28 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.

Historic England welcomes and supports, in principle, the identification of "Protect the area's valuable heritage and historic assets" as one of the challenges faced by the Plan.
However, the National Planning Policy Framework requires local plans to deliver an environmental overarching objective which includes "to contribute to conserving and enhancing our natural, built and historic environment" (paragraph 8 c)) and to include strategic policies to make sufficient provision for "conservation and enhancement of the natural, built and historic environment" (our underlining).
The Framework therefore requires local planning authorities, through their local plans, to do more than just conserve the historic environment i.e. to enhance it as well. This should be identified as a challenge (although it is also an opportunity).
Reword the last bullet point of paragraph 2.28 as; "Protect and enhance the area's valuable heritage and historic assets".
Historic England welcomes, in principle, as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework, the reference to the historic environment in paragraph 3.1;

"It is the intention of the Council to enable the delivery of infrastructure, jobs, accessible local services and housing for future generations while supporting the historic and natural environment".

However, the National Planning Policy Framework refers to "conserving and enhancing our natural, built and historic environment" (paragraph 8 c)) and the "conservation and enhancement of the natural, built and historic environment". We therefore suggest that "supporting" should be "conserving and enhancing" as terminology more consistent with the Framework and possibly ambiguous than "supporting".

Reword the first sentence of paragraph 3.1 as;
"It is the intention of the Council to enable the delivery of infrastructure, jobs, accessible local services and housing for future generations while conserving and enhancing the historic, built and natural environment".
Historic England welcomes the inclusion of "Have a quality of life that is enriched through opportunities to enjoy our local culture, arts and a conserved and enhanced heritage;" in the Vision as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes "As an historic walled cathedral city, its rich cultural and architectural heritage will be conserved, enhanced and promoted together with the views and landscape value afforded by its setting" in paragraph 3.4 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports "The conservation and enhancement of the historic environment, the high quality landscapes and the agricultural and other rural activities that support it will remain paramount" in paragraph 3.14 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports, in principle, the Strategic Objective "Conserve and enhance landscape and heritage" as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework. However, we suggest that it could be rather more ambitious e.g. "Conserve, enhance, increase appreciation and enjoyment of and access to heritage"
Paragraph 4.2 states that; "New development must achieve sustainable development principles and must not adversely affect the character, quality, amenity or safety of the built environment, wherever it occurs". The implication is that this is a requirement of the National Planning Policy Framework, but we cannot find this exact wording in the Framework.

However, paragraph 127 of the Framework does set out what planning policies and decisions should ensure of developments, including "are sympathetic to local character and history" and "establish or maintain a strong sense of place". In addition, paragraph 185 of the Framework requires plans to set out a positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment, which should take into account "the desirability of new development making a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness".

We therefore consider that the final sentence of paragraph 4.2 should be revised to more closely reflect the requirements of the National Planning Policy Framework.

Reword the final sentence of paragraph 4.2 as ""New development must achieve sustainable development principles, must not adversely affect the history, quality, amenity or safety of the natural, built and historic environment and should make a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness and establish or maintain a sense of place". (Alternatively, these could be set out as bullet points for clarity).
Historic England welcomes and supports "enhance the quality of the built, natural, historic, social and cultural environments" in Policy S2 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Although the historic environment is not identified as a constraint or as an opportunity for enhancement in paragraph 4.12 as a factor in the definition of the Settlement Hierarchy, we note that paragraph 4.14 does explain that consideration has been given to other factors in determining whether a settlement is a suitable location for additional housing growth. We would like to think that these other factors include the potential effects on the historic environment.
Historic England welcomes and supports "where possible enhances the character, significance and setting of heritage assets" as one of the considerations to guide potential discussions on a possible site for a new settlement in paragraph 4.33 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports "it is acknowledged that new development needs to be planned sensitively with special regard to the unique character of the city's historic environment and setting, and should be underpinned by historic characterisation assessments" in paragraph 4.90 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Nevertheless, we suggest that reference should also be made to heritage impact assessments to underpin the planning of new development.
Reword paragraph 4.90 to read;
"it is acknowledged that new development needs to be planned sensitively with special regard to the unique character of the city's historic environment and setting, and should be underpinned by historic characterisation assessment and heritage impact assessments".
Historic England welcomes and supports "such development will need to be sensitive to the
historic character of the city" in paragraph 4.91 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports "conserve and enhance the city's historic character and heritage", "Enhance the city's existing heritage, arts and cultural facilities", "Protect views of the cathedral" and "All development will be required to have special regard to the city's historic character and heritage. Development proposals should be underpinned by historic characterisation assessments and make a positive contribution to the city's unique character and distinctiveness" in Policy S13 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Nevertheless, we would like to see a reference to heritage impact assessments to underpin development proposals.
We also wonder if it would be helpful to have a specific policy to protect important views, allied to or combined with a policy for tall buildings in the historic city ?
Reword Policy SP13 to read "Development proposals should be underpinned by historic characterisation assessment and a heritage impact assessment......".
Historic England welcomes and supports "Any development proposals within the vicinity of the site must clearly demonstrate how the development would protect, and where possible enhance, the operation and heritage of the site as a motor-circuit and airfield" in Policy S15 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports "All proposals must ensure that the cultural and historical significance of the military facilities (and any other significant archaeological assets) located on the site, are understood and inform the scope of future development of that site" in Policy S17 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
However, we would prefer "significant archaeological assets" to be retained in situ.
Reword Policy S17 as;
"All proposals must ensure that the cultural and historical significance of the military facilities (and any other significant archaeological assets) located on the site, are understood and inform the scope of future development of that site, with any significant archaeological assets retained in situ".
Paragraph 2.2 of the Plan notes that the North of the Plan Area has "rich cultural and heritage assets". We are surprised, therefore, that paragraph 4.128 has no mention of these assets.
Reword paragraph 4.128 "This part of the plan area is predominantly rural with few sizeable settlements, characterised by undulating countryside with a high proportion of woodland, typical of the Low Weald landscape. Conserving the rural character of the area, with its high quality landscape and natural and historic environment, is a key objective".
Historic England welcomes and supports "Conserve and enhance the rural character of the area, the quality of its landscape and the natural and historic environment;" in Policy S19 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes paragraph 5.1 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Strictly-speaking, historic parks and gardens are registered for their special historic interest rather than their protection per se, but one of the purposes of Registration is to encourage appropriate protection and inclusion on the Register is a material consideration in the determination of planning applications.
Historic England welcomes paragraph 5.5 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports Policy S20, particularly the references to history, historic character and local identity in clause 1, sense of place in clause 2, character in clause 8 and high quality public realm in clause 11 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
However, we would also like to see a specific clause relating to heritage assets.
Add a new clause; "conserves or enhances the significance, special interest, character and appearance of heritage assets".
Historic England welcomes and supports paragraph 5.12 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes, in principle, paragraph 5.13 states that "Where development proposals might affect a heritage asset the Council will identify and assess the particular significance of the heritage asset and seek to avoid or minimise any conflict between the conservation of the heritage asset and any aspect of the proposal" as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
This very largely reflects paragraph 190 of the National Planning Policy Framework, but the Framework requires local planning authorities to take the particular significance of any heritage asset that might be affected by a proposal into account when considering the impact of a proposal on a heritage asset, "to avoid or minimise any conflict between the heritage asset's conservation and any aspect of the proposal". The requirement is clear - any conflict should be avoided or minimised; it is not sufficient to merely "seek to" avoid or minimise that conflict.

In addition, paragraph 189 of the Framework states;

"In determining applications, local planning authorities should require an applicant to describe the significance of any heritage assets affected, including any contribution made by their setting......Where a site on which development is proposed includes, or has the potential to include, heritage assets with archaeological interest, local planning authorities should require developers to submit an appropriate desk-based assessment and, where necessary, a field evaluation.

There is, therefore, a clear onus to be placed upon the applicant/developer to identify and describe the significance of any heritage assets affected.

Paragraphs 193, 194, 195 and 196 of the Framework set out how local planning authorities should consider the impact of a proposed development on the significance of a designated heritage asset. We believe that this could usefully be summarised in the Plan.

Reword paragraph 5.13;
"Where development proposals might affect a heritage asset the Council will identify and assess the particular significance of the heritage asset and take that significance into account when considering the impact of a proposal on a heritage asset, to avoid or minimise any conflict between the heritage asset's conservation and any aspect of the proposal".
Add new paragraphs;
"For applications which affect, or have the potential to affect, heritage assets the applicant will be expected to describe the significance of the asset and its setting, using appropriate expertise; at a level of detail proportionate to its significance and sufficient to understand the potential impact of the proposal; using appropriate references such as the Historic Environment Record and, if necessary, original survey (including, for assets of archaeological interest, an appropriate desk-based assessment and, where necessary, a field evaluation)";
"When considering the impact of a proposed development on the significance of a designated heritage asset, the Council will give great weight to the asset's conservation. Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), will require clear and convincing justification"; and

"The Council will refuse proposals that would lead to substantial harm to (or total loss of significance of) a designated heritage asset unless it can be demonstrated that the substantial harm or total loss is necessary to achieve substantial public benefits that outweigh that harm or loss, or all of the circumstances in paragraph 195 of the National Planning Policy Framework apply. For proposals that would lead to less than substantial harm to the significance of a designated heritage asset, the Council will weigh this harm against the public benefits of the proposal".

Historic England welcomes and supports Policy S22, which we consider complies with the requirements of paragraphs 17 and 20 of the National Planning Policy Framework to contain strategic policies and for those strategic policies to make sufficient provision for the conservation and enhancement of the historic environment.

We also consider that the policy forms part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework. We consider that the word "positive" is significant, and we believe that the Plan (and Council) should be proactive in the conservation and enhancement of the historic environment. National Planning Practice Guidance states "Such a [positive] strategy should recognise that conservation is not a passive exercise".
We therefore consider that the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment is not a passive exercise but requires a plan for the maintenance and use of heritage assets and for the delivery of development including within their setting that will afford appropriate protection for the asset(s) and make a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness. We therefore look to local plans to contain commitments to positive measures for the historic environment. We therefore welcome the commitments within Policy S22 to positive actions, including heritage at risk, which paragraph 185 requires to be part of that positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment. However, we do feel that the supporting text could helpfully explain a little more about the Council's approach to heritage at risk, perhaps borrowing some text from the Chichester Historic Environment Strategy and Action Plan.
We also consider that the positive strategy should comprise recognition throughout the Plan of the importance of the historic environment, of the historic environment's role in delivering the Plan's vision and the wider economic, social and environmental objectives for the Plan area, and of the potential impacts of the Plan's policies and proposals on the historic environment.
We are pleased to have identified a number of references throughout the Plan to the historic environment and we therefore consider that the Plan sets out an adequate positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of that historic environment as required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework and that the Plan is therefore compliant with that paragraph.

Add a new paragraph explaining what "heritage at risk" is and the Council's approach to assets at risk e.g.

"Unfortunately, heritage assets can be at risk from neglect, decay or other threats. Designated assets at risk, with the exception of Grade II secular buildings and Grade II places of worship used less than six times a year, are identified on the Historic England Heritage at Risk Register. Within the district outside the South Downs National Park, six assets are on the Register (February 2018): three scheduled monuments, two listed buildings and one conservation area. The Council will actively seek to address threats to heritage assets by recording and monitoring Heritage at Risk in Chichester District, publishing it on our website and working with the owners of heritage assets at risk to find solutions and secure repairs to bring them back into active use, including where appropriate viable new uses and/or proposals for enabling development so they are preserved for future generations."

Historic England suggests that paragraph 5.37 could also refer to the range of heritage assets to be found in the countryside of the Plan area.
Reword paragraph 5.37 as;

"It is valued for many reasons, including agriculture and community food production, its landscape qualities including the special characteristics of Chichester Harbour and Pagham Harbour, the setting it provides for Chichester City and other towns and villages, its range of heritage assets, including historic landscapes, and the opportunities it provides for recreation and biodiversity".
Historic England welcomes and supports clause d of Policy S32; "integrate with the surrounding built, historic and natural environments" as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
As noted in paragraph 6.12, the Chichester Entrenchments Scheduled Monument lies partly within and partly immediately to the north of the site. Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework identifies Scheduled Monuments as being assets "of the highest significance", substantial harm to or loss of which should be wholly exceptional.

We have previously commented (as English Heritage) on the allocation of this site during the consultation on the Key Policies. We explained that development close to the earthworks might harm the historical value of the heritage asset by interrupting views between its parts and introducing incongruous land-use in its immediate surroundings. This in turn would make it difficult to appreciate the asset's open rural setting, its extensive linear nature and its purpose of enclosing large areas of open land.

Accordingly, we initially objected to the form of the allocation in the Key Policies, but subsequently withdrew that objection following amendments to the boundary of the Strategic Development Location on its northern side so that the boundary ran along the south edge of the belt of woodland in which the scheduled monument sits, thereby entirely excluding the monument from the SDL, and the allocation of the northern area of the amended site as open space.
We are therefore pleased to see that the Strategic Site Allocation still excludes the scheduled monument. We also welcome and support the following requirements of Policy AL1, which we consider provide, in principle, adequate protection for the Scheduled Monument in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework:
6. Landscaped to protect priority views of Chichester Cathedral spire;
7. Keep land north of the B2178 in open use, free from built development, to protect the natural history interest of both Brandy Hole Copse, and the setting of the Chichester Entrenchments Scheduled Monument;
8. Conserve, enhance and better reveal the significance of the Chichester Entrenchments Scheduled Monument and other non-designated heritage assets and their settings and to record and advance understanding of the significance of any heritage assets to be harmed or lost;
However, this comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Historic England makes no comment on the principle of the Shopwyke Strategic Site Allocation, which we note is an existing allocation.
However, the Grade II listed barn at Greenway Farm is located to the south-west of the site and the Grade II listed Shopwyke Grange and the Grade II* listed Shopwyke Hall are located to the south-east. Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification". The paragraph identifies Grade II* buildings as assets of the "highest significance".

Historic England therefore welcomes and supports, in principle, the following requirement of Policy AL2, which we consider provide, in principle, adequate protection for the listed barn and Shopwyke Hall in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework:
7. Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and conserve and enhance the historic significance of the listed barn at Greenway Farm and the cluster of buildings associated with the grade II* listed Shopwhyke Hall, which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan.
However, we consider that reference should also be made to the Grade II listed Shopwyke Grange. This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Reword criterion 7;"Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and conserve and enhance the historic significance of the listed barn at Greenway Farm, the listed Shopwyke Grange and the cluster of buildings associated with the grade II* listed Shopwhyke Hall which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan".
According to our records there are no designated heritage assets on this site, although the Grade II listed Shopwyke Grange and Grade II* listed Shopwyke Hall lie to the north-east of the allocated area, Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification". The paragraph identifies Grade II* buildings as assets of the "highest significance".

We note that criterion 7 of Policy AL2 requires the development of the Shopwyke Strategic Site Allocation to ".......conserve and enhance the historic significance of the......cluster of buildings associated with the grade II* listed Shopwhyke Hall, which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan. We have suggested in our comments on this policy that it include reference to the listed Shopwyke Grange, and we consider that this requirement should also be included in Policy AL3 to provide, in principle, adequate protection for the listed barn and Shopwyke Hall in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework.

Historic England welcomes and supports criterion 8 of Policy AL2; "Existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire are to be protected". However, this comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Reword criterion 8 as;
"Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and conserve and enhance the historic significance of the listed Shopwyke Grange and the cluster of buildings associated with the grade II* listed Shopwhyke Hall which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan".
Historic England makes no comment on the principle of the two sites at Land at Westhampnett/North East Chichester Strategic Site Allocation, which we note were part of a broad strategic development location in the adopted Local Plan.
However, the site abuts the Graylingwell Hospital Conservation Area, the buildings of the former 'pauper lunatic asylum' (including the Grade II listed chapel), the Grade II listed Summersdale Farmhouse and a Grade II registered park and garden. Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification".
Historic England therefore welcomes and supports, in principle, the following requirement of Policy AL4, which we consider provide, in principle, adequate protection for these designated assets in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework:
9. Development should be designed with special regard to the Graylingwell Hospital
Conservation Area, the buildings of the former 'pauper lunatic asylum' and the Grade II registered park and garden in which they sit, and to other listed buildings in the vicinity of the site and their settings. Important views of Chichester Cathedral spire from the area should be protected;
This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Historic England makes no comment on the principle of the Southern Gateway Strategic Site Allocation.
However, the site includes a row of Grade II listed buildings on Southgate and a number of non-designated heritage assets (the southern gateway of the city had Roman roads converging upon it and this is likely to result in enhanced archaeological potential in this part of the city. The development of suburbs in the medieval and later periods is a further factor with both the canal and railway as examples of later uses of the area. There are a number of buildings of interest, including the former Law Courts and Bus Garage). Part of the site lies within the Chichester Conservation Area and there are listed buildings adjacent to the site.
Paragraph 184 of the National Planning Policy Framework states heritage assets "are an irreplaceable resource, and should be conserved in a manner appropriate to their significance, so that they can be enjoyed for their contribution to the quality of life of existing and future generations". Paragraph 194 of the Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification".

Historic England therefore welcomes and supports, in principle, the following requirements of Policy AL5;

3. Respect for the historic context and make a positive contribution towards protecting and enhancing the local character and special heritage of the area and important historic views, especially those from the Canal Basin towards Chichester Cathedral;
9. Include an archaeological assessment to define the extent and significance of any
archaeological remains and reflect these in the proposals, as appropriate;
However, we consider that these requirements should be strengthened to ensure that they provide adequate protection for these assets in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework. In addition, we consider that Policy AL5 should promote more strongly the opportunity to use the heritage of the area to help define its character and the desirability of new development making a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
These comments are without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Reword clause 2 as follows;
Proposals should include a high quality distinctive design response appropriate to this gateway location and based on the character and heritage of the area, which establishes a clear hierarchy of streets and spaces, active frontages of buildings which front streets and spaces with clearly defined building lines;
Reword clause 3 as follows;
3. Respect for the historic context and make a positive contribution towards protecting and enhancing the local character and special heritage of the area, including the Conservation Area, listed buildings (both on and adjacent to the site), non-designated buildings of historic interest and important historic views, especially those from the Canal Basin towards Chichester Cathedral;
Reword clause 9 as follows;
9. Include an archaeological assessment to define the extent and significance of any
archaeological remains and reflect these in the proposals;
According to our records, the site Land South-West of Chichester (Apuldram and Donnington Parishes) contains no designated heritage assets. We therefore have no comment on the principle of the allocation, although we would expect its potential for non-designated archaeology to have been assessed, with reference to the Council's Historic Environment Record, in accordance with paragraph 187 of the National Planning Policy Framework which states;
Local planning authorities should maintain or have access to a historic environment record. This should contain up-to-date evidence about the historic environment in their area and be used to:
a) assess the significance of heritage assets and the contribution they make to their environment; and
b) predict the likelihood that currently unidentified heritage assets, particularly sites of historic and archaeological interest, will be discovered in the future.
Historic England welcomes and supports clause 3:
3. Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and the setting of the Chichester Harbour Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty which should be analysed at an early stage of the masterplan;
This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
According to our records, the site at Highgrove Farm, Bosham, contains no designated heritage assets. We therefore have no comment on the principle of the allocation, although we would expect its potential for non-designated archaeology to have been assessed, with reference to the Council's Historic Environment Record, in accordance with paragraph 187 of the National Planning Policy Framework which states;
Local planning authorities should maintain or have access to a historic environment record. This should contain up-to-date evidence about the historic environment in their area and be used to:
a) assess the significance of heritage assets and the contribution they make to their environment; and
b) predict the likelihood that currently unidentified heritage assets, particularly sites of historic and archaeological interest, will be discovered in the future.
This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.

Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Fishbourne Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 250 dwellings.
However, we note that one of the specific issues that need to be taken into account in planning for development at Fishbourne identified in paragraph 6.65 of the Plan is "Protecting the heritage assets of Fishbourne and their setting".
We welcome the recognition and identification of this issue, but we consider that it should be included as a specific requirement in Policy AL9, to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.
Add the following clause to Policy AL9;
"Demonstration that the development would not have an adverse impact on the significance of heritage assets, including listed buildings and the Fishbourne Roman site Scheduled Monument, or the character or appearance of the Fishbourne Conservation Area".
Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Chidham and Hambrook Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 500 dwellings.
However, we consider that Policy AL10 should include a specific requirement to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.
Add the following clause to Policy AL10;
"Demonstration that the development would not have an adverse impact on the significance of heritage assets.
Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Hunston Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 250 dwellings.
However, we note that one of the specific issues that need to be taken into account in planning for development at Hunston identified in paragraph 6.77 of the Plan is "Respecting the setting of listed buildings and the Hunston conservation area".
We welcome the recognition and identification of this issue, but we consider that it should be included as a specific requirement in Policy AL11, to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.
Add the following clause to Policy AL11;
"Demonstration that the development would not have an adverse impact on the significance of heritage assets, including listed buildings, or on the character or appearance of the Hunston Conservation Area."
According to our records, the site Land north of Park Farm, Selsey, contains no designated heritage assets. We therefore have no comment on the principle of the allocation, although we would expect its potential for non-designated archaeology to have been assessed, with reference to the Council's Historic Environment Record, in accordance with paragraph 187 of the National Planning Policy Framework which states;
Local planning authorities should maintain or have access to a historic environment record. This should contain up-to-date evidence about the historic environment in their area and be used to:
a) assess the significance of heritage assets and the contribution they make to their environment; and
b) predict the likelihood that currently unidentified heritage assets, particularly sites of historic and archaeological interest, will be discovered in the future.

This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Historic England has no comments on the principle of land being allocated in the revised Southbourne Neighbourhood Plan for a minimum of 1,250 dwellings.
However, we consider that a specific requirement should be included in Policy AL13 to ensure that the allocation of the site or sites in the Neighbourhood Plan conforms with the National Planning Policy Framework, particularly paragraphs 184 and 194.
Add the following clause to Policy AL13;
"Demonstration that the development would not have an adverse impact on the significance of heritage assets, including listed buildings, or on the character or appearance of the Prinsted Conservation Area."
Historic England has no comments on the principle of the allocation Land West of Tangmere.

However, the site is close to the Tangmere Conservation Area and a number of listed buildings, including the Grade I listed Church of St Andrew. Paragraph 194 of the National Planning Policy Framework states "Any harm to, or loss of, the significance of a designated heritage asset (from its alteration or destruction, or from development within its setting), should require clear and convincing justification". The paragraph identifies Grade I buildings as assets of the "highest significance".

Historic England therefore welcomes, in principle, clauses 5 and 8 of Policy AL14

5. Protect existing views of Chichester Cathedral spire and reduce any impact on views from within the National Park;
8. Conserve and enhance the heritage and potential archaeological interest of the village, surrounding areas and World War II airfield, including the expansion or relocation of the Tangmere Military Aviation Museum.
However, we consider that clause 8 should be strengthened to ensure that it provides adequate protection for these assets in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework. In addition, we note that paragraph 6.95 of the Plan identifies, as one of the specific issues need to be taken into account in planning the development and site layout at Tangmere, "Conserving and enhancing the setting of the historic village (particularly the Conservation Area"). We consider that this should be included within Policy AL14.
This comment is without prejudice to any comments we may wish to make on any planning application that may be submitted for the development of this site.
Reword criterion 8 as follows:

8. Conserve and enhance the heritage and potential archaeological interest of the village, surrounding areas and World War II airfield, particularly the Conservation Area and the Grade I listed Church of St Andrew and including the expansion or relocation of the Tangmere Military Aviation Museum.
Add a new criterion as follows:
""Conserve and enhancie the setting of the historic village, particularly of the Conservation Area".
Historic England welcomes and supports clause b of Policy DM3 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports clauses 1 c and 2 e of Policy DM5 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes, in principle, clause 2 of Policy DM13 but considers that the policy should be, in the first instance, to avoid adverse impact on the historic environment as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework. We consider that the wording used in Policies DM3 and DM5 would be appropriate.
Reword clause 2 of Policy DM13 as:
"Is located so as not compromise the essential features of nationally designated areas of landscape, historic environment or nature conservation protection".
Historic England welcomes and supports clause 1 of Policy DM17 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports clause b of Policy DM20 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Historic England welcomes and supports paragraph 7.129 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Many farm buildings that are now redundant for modern farming needs are likely to be of historic interest - it is acknowledged that farm buildings are generally under-represented on the National Heritage List for England. Historic England considers that Policy DM21 should include stronger protection for such buildings as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
Add a new criterion to Policy DM21 as follows:

"Features of architectural or historic significance are retained and, where the building forms part of a historically significant complex of buildings, consideration is given to the future use(s) of those buildings and the impact of the proposal on the integrity and character of the complex".
Historic England welcomes and supports, in principle, paragraphs 7.154 - 7.161.
However, we consider that paragraph 7.154 should be reworded to clarify the distinction between designated and non-designated heritage assets (the latter including buildings on the Local Buildings List for Chichester).
Reword paragraph 7.154 as follows:
"There are a large number of "Heritage Assets" (as defined in the National Planning Policy Framework), both designated and non-designated, in the plan area. Designated assets are Listed Buildings, Scheduled Monuments, Conservation Areas and Registered Historic Parks and Gardens. Non-designated assets include archaeological sites (although the remains may be of national significance equivalent to scheduled monuments, and which should be considered subject to the policies for scheduled monuments) and non-listed buildings which have been identified as locally important, such as those on the Local Buildings List for Chichester City and 'positive' buildings within Conservation Areas."
Historic England welcomes and supports in principle, Policy DM27 both as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment as required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework and also as a non-strategic policy for the conservation and enhancement of the historic environment as suggested by paragraph 28 of the Framework.
However, we consider that clause e. should specify the (wholly) exceptional circumstances in which permission for a proposed development that would lead to substantial harm to (or total loss of significance of) a designated heritage asset would be granted i.e. where it can be demonstrated that the substantial harm or total loss is necessary to achieve substantial public benefits that outweigh that harm or loss, or all of the circumstances in paragraph 195 of the National Planning Policy Framework apply.

We would also welcome the policy being more detailed in terms of the considerations to be taken into account when assessing development proposals affecting the different types of heritage asset, as do, for example, Policies EH10, EH11, EH14 and EH15 of the West Oxfordshire Local Plan 2031. These policies were developed with Historic England and the Inspector that examined the Local Plan 2031 shared our concern that the historic environment policy in the Local Plan 2031 provided inadequate locally specific detailed policy guidance and considered the more detailed policies necessary for the Plan to be sound.

(However, we do acknowledge that the Inspector that examined the Key Policies development plan document considered the modified historic environment policy (Policy 47) put forward by the Council with our support was sufficient for the Plan to be sound, and that Policy DM27 in the Local Plan Review very largely repeats Policy 47).

Reword clause e. of Policy DM27 as follows;
"Development involving substantial harm to or loss of designated heritage assets will
only be granted in exceptional circumstances (wholly exceptional circumstances for
designated assets of the highest significance) i.e. where it can be demonstrated that the substantial harm or total loss is necessary to achieve substantial public benefits that outweigh that harm or loss, or all of the circumstances in paragraph 195 of the National Planning Policy Framework apply.

More details of the considerations to be taken into account when assessing development proposals affecting the different types of heritage asset. We would be pleased to work with the Council on a revised policy or policies.

Paragraph 7.195 of the Plan notes that the remnants of canals "are important early 19th Century historic features in the landscape of the coastal plain and warrant protection".
Historic England agrees with this statement, but Policy DM33 makes no mention of protecting the historic significance of the remaining canal sections.
Reword the first paragraph of Policy DM33 as follows;
"Development that makes provision of through navigation or enhancement of the Chichester Ship Canal and the Wey and Arun Canal will be supported where it meets environmental, ecological, historical and transport considerations."
Historic England welcomes and supports clause 3 of Policy DM34 as part of the positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment required by paragraph 185 of the National Planning Policy Framework.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2304

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Portsmouth Water Ltd

Representation Summary:

Policy AL4 'Westhampnett' Phase 1 is already under construction and account has been taken of the large diameter main that crosses the site. Phase 2 is an extension of the existing Greylingwell site but it is not clear if this has been allowed for in the design of this 'Inset Appointment'. Portsmouth Water do not own the mains and there may be a single point of supply.

Full text:

Spatial Vision
Portsmouth Water note that there are significant additional housing allocations to the west of Chichester and on the coastal strip. These sites will need to be assessed for water supply and funding included in the Infrastructure Charging scheme. (See Map 4.1 Key Diagram)

It is not clear what water storage capacity is being referred to in Section 3.19. Portsmouth Water will review the provision of Service Reservoirs, for day to day use, and has re-started development of a large raw water storage reservoir at Havant Thicket. The reservoir, when combined with Portsmouth Water's existing sources and enhancements to its groundwater sources, would create sufficient
surplus to support an additional flexible daily transfer of treated water from Portsmouth Water are to Southern Water without detriment to Portsmouth Water's resilience.

Southern Water requires this transfer to help meet a significant deficit in its Southampton East, Southampton West and Isle of Wight resource zones. This deficit arose after Southern Water agreed to reduce its abstraction licences on the Rivers Test and River Itchen at a public inquiry in March 2018, to help protect the environment.

It is not clear that the water demands of the Horticultural Development Areas have been assessed. It is possible that these businesses will rely on rainwater harvesting and storage but changes in licencing regulations mean that 'Trickle Irrigation' is no longer exempt from abstraction licencing.

Groundwater abstraction in the coastal plain will require an impact assessment under the Habitats Regulations. (Section 4.75)

Spatial Strategy

Policy S12 sets out how development can make effective use of existing infrastructure. Portsmouth Water agree that the siting and timing of development can assist with the economic provision of water resource infrastructure. It also states that safeguarding existing infrastructure, such as water mains and aquifers, is important. Portsmouth Water would urge developers to check for existing infrastructure and for source protection zones that may limit development options.
Water infrastructure is not funded through CIL but a separate 'Infrastructure Charge' payable for each individual house. This is designed to pay for all off-site water infrastructure such as mains reinforcements, service reservoirs and supply. Development to an agreed program will help this system work effectively.

Strategic Policies

Policy S27 'Flood Risk Management' refers to Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) and the need to control surface water run-off. It should also refer to aquifer protection and the need for caution when using infiltration systems especially deep bore systems. This applies particularly when the site is in, or close to, a source protection zone.

Policy S31 'Wastewater Management and Water Quality' refers to higher standards in the Building Regulations for water consumption to reduce pollution in the harbours. Portsmouth Waters 'Water Resources Management Plan' is based on lower per capita consumption and we have an aspiration for all customer to reach 100 litres/head/day by 2050. This is no substitute for reducing overall flows
to sewage treatment works by the control of groundwater infiltration and surface water drainage.

Strategic Site Allocations

Policy AL1 'West of Chichester' does not mention water supply so we assume that the site has reverted to a conventional system with sewerage pumped to Tangmere WWTW and water supplied by us. Portsmouth Water has provided provisional designs for this system and there are no existing large diameter water mains on the site. Costs for reinforcement of the water mains will be recovered by the new Infrastructure Charge and on site mains are likely to be provided by a third
party. Information on how reinforcement of the water mains is recovered by the Infrastructure Charge can be found in Portsmouth Water's Developer Charging Arrangements on our website under https://www.portsmouthwater.co.uk/developers/.

Policy AL2 'Shopwyke' is already under construction and has a conventional water supply system with all elements provided by us. Costs are being recovered via the Infrastructure Charge and on-site charges.

Policy AL3 'East of Chichester' is a new strategic site and there are no large diameter mains crossing it. This is an old landfill and may contain material that can damage plastic pipes. On site mains may need to be protected or be more expensive to ensure water quality is maintained.

Policy AL4 'Westhampnett' Phase 1 is already under construction and account has been taken of the large diameter main that crosses the site. Phase 2 is an extension of the existing Greylingwell site but it is not clear if this has been allowed for in the design of this 'Inset Appointment'. Portsmouth Water do not own the mains and there may be a single point of supply.

Policy AL5 'Southern Gateway' is an inner city development with a good water supply system. The reference to the 'efficient use of water' is confusing because many of the other strategic development sites also drain to Apuldram WWTW. All sites need to be water efficient but not follow the example of the 'Code for Sustainable Homes'. Sites were developed in Chichester that used rainwater harvesting to meet the Code objectives but were able to use higher water use fittings such as power showers. This led to properties producing more sewage than equivalent water efficient homes. This did not achieve the objective at Apuldram. An alternative provision might be to reduce infiltration but it is not clear how this would be funded or who would carry out the work.

Policy AL6 'South West Chichester' is crossed by a large diameter main that will have to be reflected in the road layout or diverted. The proposed link road may offer an alternative route for the main.

Policy AL7 'Bosham' is situated on the old A27 and there are no large diameter mains in the area.

Policy AL8 'East Wittering' is at the extremity of the distribution system and may be expensive to supply.

Policy AL9 'Fishbourne' allocation is not site specific and it is difficult to comment on the feasibility of water supply. Any off site costs will be recovered via the new Infrastructure Charge. Portsmouth Water have public water supply abstractions in the area and development is likely to be located in a source protection zone for our Fishbourne public water supply abstraction. Under this policy, where development is in a source protection zone, the policy should also refer to groundwater quality
protection and the additional requirements when using infiltration systems in particular deep bore systems. Further guidance on Portsmouth Water's preferred approach to development relating to groundwater quality within our catchments can be found within 'Portsmouth Water's Groundwater Protection Guidance notes' which are attached to this response and also available to view on our website under https://www.portsmouthwater.co.uk/developers/groundwater-protection/.

Policy AL10 'Chidham and Hambrook' is a large site and may need to be considered in combination with 'Southbourne' and 'Bosham'. There are no large diameter mains in the area and mains reinforcements may be required.

Policy AL11 'Hunston' allocation is not site specific.

Policy A12 'Selsey' is at the extremity of the distribution system and has seen previous housing growth. Reinforcement of the water mains may need to be provided.

Policy AL13 'Southbourne' is supplied from a different distribution system to Chichester. This is a very large housing allocation and this may need to be considered in combination with 'Hambrook' and 'Bosham'. There are sufficient water resources for all the housing allocated to Portsmouth Water's area of supply. It is the location of the housing site in relation to existing trunk mains and
service reservoirs that determines the cost to supply. Local reinforcement of the water mains may be required.

Policy AL14 'Tangmere' housing allocation has increased by 30% and we may need to repeat the modelling that has already been done. There is also uncertainty about the water supply to the HDA which seems to rely on rainwater harvesting for future growth. The housing development and the HDA could have an impact on our source protection zone. Under this policy, where development is in a source protection zone, the policy should also refer to groundwater quality protection and the
additional requirements when using infiltration systems in particular deep bore systems. Guidance should be sought from Portsmouth Water's Groundwater Protection Guidance for development.

Policy AL15 'Land at Chichester Business Park, Tangmere' Portsmouth Water have public water supply abstractions in the area and the site allocation is likely to be within a source protection zone for our Aldingbourne public water supply abstraction. As above, where development is in a source protection zone, the policy should also refer to groundwater quality protection and the need for caution when using infiltration systems in particular deep bore systems. Please refer to Portsmouth Water's Groundwater Protection Guidance for further information.

Development Management

Policy DM10: 'New Employment Sites' Development proposal should be compatible with other policies in the Plan, in particular DM9 'Existing Employment Sites' to ensure that the development is otherwise acceptable. Policy DM9 states that development should 'not generate unacceptable levels of water pollution' and this should include groundwater pollution. This requirement should also be applied to Policy DM10, especially when the site is in, or close to, a source protection zone.

Policy DM15 'Horticultural Development' Developments at Tangmere HDA have relied on infiltration to dispose of excess surface water. This policy states that development should 'not generate unacceptable levels of water pollution' and this should include groundwater pollution. Portsmouth Water have public water supply abstractions in the area and the potential impacts must be assessed for any SUDS. The EA 'Abstraction Licencing Strategy' (ALS) may give an indication about the
availability of groundwater but it does not cover the derogation of existing supplies.

Policy DM16 'Sustainable Design and Construction' covers the use of Building Regulations to control water use. Portsmouth Water have an aspiration to reduce overall water use to 100 litres/head/day and this policy will help to achieve that aim.

Policy DM18 'Water Management' using SUDS needs to take account groundwater quality and should avoid direct infiltration into the chalk aquifer. This is especially important within the source protection zones.

Policy DM29 'Biodiversity' Portsmouth Water has legal duties to protect and where practical enhance biodiversity and has an active program of work on it's own land. This work is now expanding to include projects on other people's land in association with 'Catchment Management' activities. We would look to CDC for support in areas such as Bosham Stream, Lavant Stream and Fishbourne Stream where schemes could be developed in partnership with local housing developments.

Policy DM35 'Equestrian Development' can have a direct impact on water quality including groundwater quality. Portsmouth Water support the protection of water courses and aquifers.

Appendix 'E' Monitoring Framework

Policy S12 covers the provision of infrastructure but it is not clear how records of completed projects will be collected or stored.

Policy S26 covers biodiversity improvements and Natural England should be consulted on priorities and record keeping.

Policy S31 covers water consumption which is only available for the whole Company area in the WRMP Annual Review.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2333

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Southern Water

Representation Summary:

The existing provision within Policy AL4 relating to wastewater conveyance and treatment is noted, and was supported by Southern Water during historic consultations on the current Chichester Local Plan Key Policies 2014-2029. However, since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, we have adjusted our approach accordingly. Southern Water will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of new infrastructure aligns with the occupation of the development, and this is reflected in the proposed amendments below.

Full text:

Policy S31
Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker within Chichester District, also supplying water to the northern area of the district, within the South Downs National Park, as well as the north eastern corner of the District outside the National Park.
Through Chichester District Council's (CDC) Water Quality Group, Southern Water has been working with CDC and other stakeholders to help identify and address river and estuarine water quality issues within the District. Southern Water has in recent years invested in solutions that have either been implemented, or are in progress. In tandem with this, an important contribution through the Local Plan will be to ensure that new development does not cause detriment to the existing situation.
By adopting higher water efficiency measures and ensuring that surface water from new development is prevented from discharging to the foul network, Southern Water believes these measures will be effective in helping to mitigate the impact of new development. This approach is supported, in conjunction with a requirement to phase development to align with the delivery of new or improved infrastructure as set out in Policy S12(5). The combination of these measures, together with those submitted for inclusion within individual site allocations which seek to prevent occupation of new development ahead of necessary sewer improvements, will contribute to reducing the risk of sewer flooding that may otherwise have
been exacerbated.

Policy AL1
Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Chichester. Taking into account preceding work that has already taken place and existing consent at this site, Southern Water will connect development at Land West of Chichester to Tangmere Wastewater Treatment Works. The necessary infrastructure is scheduled for delivery by the end of 2020.
The existing provision within Policy AL1 relating to wastewater conveyance and treatment is noted, and was supported by Southern Water during historic consultations on the current Chichester Local Plan Key Policies 2014-2029. However, since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, we have adjusted our approach accordingly. Southern Water will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of new infrastructure aligns with the occupation of the development, and this is reflected in the proposed amendments below.

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following amendment to Policy AL1:
Occupation of development is phased to align with the delivery of infrastructure for adequate wastewater conveyance and treatment to meet strict environmenta standards.

Policy AL2
Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Oving Parish. Taking into
account preceding work that has already taken place at this site, Southern Water will
connect development at Land at Shopwyke to Tangmere Wastewater Treatment Works.
The necessary infrastructure is scheduled for delivery by the end of 2020.
The existing provision within Policy AL2 relating to wastewater conveyance and treatment is noted, and was supported by Southern Water during historic consultations on the current Chichester Local Plan Key Policies 2014-2029. However, since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, we have adjusted our approach accordingly. Southern Water will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of new infrastructure aligns with the occupation of the development, and this is reflected in the
proposed amendments below.

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following amendment to Policy AL2:
Occupation of development is phased to align with the delivery of infrastructure for adequate wastewater conveyance and treatment to meet strict environmental standards.

Policy AL3
Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Oving Parish. Taking into
account preceding work that has already taken place at the adjacent Shopwyke site,
Southern Water will connect development at Land East of Chichester to Tangmere
Wastewater Treatment Works. The necessary infrastructure is scheduled for delivery by the end of 2020.
We note the existing provision within Policy AL3 relating to the need to demonstrate capacity within the sewer network and wastewater treatment works. Southern Water supports this provision, however since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, we also will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of new infrastructure aligns with the occupation of the development. This is reflected in the proposed additional policy provision below.

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following additional criterion to Policy AL3:
Occupation of development will be phased to align with the delivery of sewerage infrastructure, in consultation with the service provider.

Policy AL4
Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Westhampnett and North East Chichester. Taking into account preceding work that has already taken place at this site, Southern Water will connect development at this site to Tangmere Wastewater Treatment Works. The necessary infrastructure is scheduled for delivery by the end of 2020.
The existing provision within Policy AL4 relating to wastewater conveyance and treatment is noted, and was supported by Southern Water during historic consultations on the current Chichester Local Plan Key Policies 2014-2029. However, since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, we have adjusted our approach accordingly. Southern Water will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of new infrastructure aligns with the occupation of the development, and this is reflected in the
proposed amendments below.

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following amendment to Policy AL4:
Occupation of development will be phased to align with the delivery of infrastructure for adequate wastewater conveyance and treatment to meet strict environmental standards.

Policy AL6
Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Apuldram and Donnington
Parishes. In accordance with this, we have undertaken an assessment of the existing
capacity of our infrastructure and its ability to meet the forecast demand for this proposal.

The assessment reveals that local sewerage infrastructure in closest proximity to the site has limited capacity to accommodate the proposed development. Limited capacity is not a constraint to development provided that planning policy and subsequent conditions ensure that occupation of the development is phased to align with the delivery of wastewater infrastructure.

Proposals for 100 dwellings at this site will generate a need for reinforcement of the
wastewater network in order to provide additional capacity to serve the development. Since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, this reinforcement will be provided through the New Infrastructure charge, but Southern Water will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of network reinforcement aligns with the occupation of the development. Connection of new development at this site ahead of new infrastructure delivery could lead to an increased risk of flooding unless the requisite works are implemented in advance of occupation.

Southern Water has limited powers to prevent connections to the sewerage network, even when capacity is limited. Planning policies and planning conditions, therefore, play an important role in ensuring that development is coordinated with the provision of necessary infrastructure, and does not contribute to pollution of the environment, in line with paragraph
170(e) of the revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) (2018).

Proximity to Wastewater Treatment Works

In addition, we note that part of the site is opposite Apuldram Wastewater Treatment Works (WTW), and our concern is that the proximity of any 'sensitive' development to the WTW, such as housing, would have an unacceptable impact on the amenity of the site's future occupants arising from the WTW's essential operational activities.

Such impacts may include odour from wastewater processing and noise and vibration from operational vehicles and equipment. Paragraph 6.3.5 of the West Sussex Waste Local Plan 2014 (p42) states that 'existing waste sites and infrastructure will be protected from inappropriate neighbouring developments that may prejudice their continuing efficient operation' and that 'sensitive' uses need to consider a buffer that will depend on 'the nature of the proposed 'sensitive' use and on the specific impacts of the current waste operation'.

Having regard to the above, it is important that the layout of any development scheme should be informed by an odour assessment, to ensure there is adequate separation between sensitive new development and the WTW. This approach is further supported by The Institute of Air Quality Management (IAQM) 'Guidance on the assessment of odour for planning', paragraph 2.1 which states that 'the planning system has the task of guiding development to the most appropriate locations: ideally, significant sources of odour should be separated from odour-sensitive users of the surrounding land (sensitive receptors) [...].
New proposals for such developments may require an odour impact assessment to be
submitted'.

Existing infrastructure

We have also made an initial assessment of this site and ascertained that Southern Water's sewerage infrastructure crosses the site, which needs to be taken into account when designing the layout of any proposed development. An easement width of 6 metres or more, depending on pipe size and depth, would be required, which may affect site layout or require diversion. This easement should be clear of all proposed buildings and substantial tree planting.

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following additions to Policy AL6:
Occupation of development will be phased to align with the delivery of sewerage infrastructure, in consultation with the service provider.

The development layout must provide sufficient distance between Apuldram Wastewater Treatment Works and sensitive land uses, such as residential units, to allow adequate odour dispersion, on the basis of an odour assessment to be undertaken in consultation with Southern Water.

Layout of the development must be planned to ensure future access to existing sewerage infrastructure for maintenance and upsizing purposes.

Policy AL7

Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Bosham Parish. In accordance with this, we have undertaken an assessment of the existing capacity of our infrastructure and its ability to meet the forecast demand for this proposal. The assessment reveals that local sewerage infrastructure in closest proximity to the site has limited capacity to accommodate the proposed development. Limited capacity is not a constraint to development provided that planning policy and subsequent conditions ensure that occupation of the development is phased to align with the delivery of wastewater infrastructure.

Proposals for 250 dwellings at this site will generate a need for reinforcement of the
wastewater network in order to provide additional capacity to serve the development. Since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, this reinforcement will be provided through the New Infrastructure charge, but Southern Water will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of network reinforcement aligns with the occupation of the development. Connection of new development at this site ahead of new infrastructure delivery could lead to an increased risk of flooding unless the requisite works are implemented in advance of occupation.

Southern Water has limited powers to prevent connections to the sewerage network, even when capacity is limited. Planning policies and planning conditions, therefore, play an important role in ensuring that development is coordinated with the provision of necessary infrastructure, and does not contribute to pollution of the environment, in line with paragraph 170(e) of the revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) (2018).

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following addition to Policy AL7
(new text underlined):

Occupation of development will be phased to align with the delivery of sewerage infrastructure, in consultation with the service provider.

Policy AL9

Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Fishbourne Parish. We note that the spatial distribution of the allocated 250 dwellings will be determined through a revision of the Fishbourne Neighbourhood Plan. Until sites are determined Southern Water is unable to carry out an assessment of the impact of development on the local sewer network.
However, in order to minimise flood risk and other impacts on the environment, sewer capacity will need to be considered, as well as wastewater treatment capacity.

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following amendment to Policy AL9 (new text underlined):

Ensure sufficient capacity within the sewer network and relevant Wastewater Treatment Works before the delivery of development as required.

Policy AL12

Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Selsey Parish. In accordance with this, we have undertaken an assessment of the existing capacity of our infrastructure and its ability to meet the forecast demand for this proposal. The assessment reveals that local sewerage infrastructure in closest proximity to the site has limited capacity to accommodate the proposed development. Limited capacity is not a constraint to development provided that planning policy and subsequent conditions ensure that occupation of the development is phased to align with the delivery of wastewater infrastructure.

Proposals for 250 dwellings at this site will generate a need for reinforcement of the
wastewater network in order to provide additional capacity to serve the development. Since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, this reinforcement will be provided through the New Infrastructure charge, but Southern Water will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of network reinforcement aligns with the occupation of the development. Connection of new development at this site ahead of new infrastructure delivery could lead to an increased risk of flooding unless the requisite works are implemented in advance of occupation.

Southern Water has limited powers to prevent connections to the sewerage network, even when capacity is limited. Planning policies and planning conditions, therefore, play an important role in ensuring that development is coordinated with the provision of necessary infrastructure, and does not contribute to pollution of the environment, in line with paragraph 170(e) of the revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) (2018).

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following addition to Policy AL12 (new text underlined):

Occupation of development will be phased to align with the delivery of sewerage infrastructure, in consultation with the service provider.

Policy AL13

Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Southbourne Parish. We note that the spatial distribution of the allocated 1,250 dwellings will be determined through a revision of the Southbourne Neighbourhood Plan. Until sites are determined Southern Water is unable to carry out an assessment of the impact of development on the local sewer network, however, in order to minimise flood risk and other impacts on the environment, sewer capacity will need to be considered, as well as wastewater treatment capacity.

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following amendment to Policy AL13 (new text underlined):
Ensure sufficient capacity within the sewer network and relevant Wastewater Treatment Works before the delivery of development as required.

Policy AL14

Southern Water is the statutory wastewater undertaker for Tangmere. Taking into account preceding work that has already taken place at this site, Southern Water will connect development at this site to Tangmere Wastewater Treatment Works. The necessary infrastructure is scheduled for delivery by the end of 2020.

The existing provision within Policy AL14 relating to wastewater conveyance and treatment is noted, and was supported by Southern Water during historic consultations on the current Chichester Local Plan Key Policies 2014-2029. However, since OFWAT's new approach to water and wastewater connections charging was implemented from 1 April 2018, we have adjusted our approach accordingly. Southern Water will need to work with site promoters to understand the development program and to review whether the delivery of new infrastructure aligns with the occupation of the development, and this is reflected in the
proposed amendments below.

Having regard to the above, Southern Water proposes the following amendment to Policy AL14:

Occupation of development will be dependent on the provision phased to align with the delivery of infrastructure for adequate wastewater conveyance and treatment to meet strict environmental standards.

Support

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2358

Received: 05/02/2019

Respondent: West Sussex Local Access Forum (WSLAF)

Representation Summary:

Opportunities for the provision of green infrastructure links to the wider countryside within these Policies are welcomed. It is particularly relevant to the Coastal Plain where the current provision of multi-user routes is very limited. Improvements in this area would comply with the objectives of the West Sussex Rights of Way Management Pan 2018-2028.

Full text:

Para 3.2 bullet points 5, 9 & 10 - these objectives are supported
The Local Plan Strategic Objectives
Para 3.19 Health & Well-Being bullet point 1 - this objective is supported
Policy S18 Integrated Coastal Zone Management for the Manhood Peninsula : Objective 5 - while the objective is supported it should apply to all Non-Motorised User (NMU) activity. This could best be achieved by ensuring at least one multi-user route is provided around and through developments linked to the existing Public Right of Way (PRoW) and wider access networks.
Design : Policy 20 bullet point 5 - the objective is supported but should recognise that this includes multi-use PRoW for the use and benefit of all.
Planning for Health and Well-being Para 5.9 - this objective is supported but should encourage all NMU activity not limited to walking and cycling.
Transport Infrastructure
Para 5.15 - the inclusion of bridleways is welcomed but there should be specific inclusion of PRoW
Para 5.16 - the wording is misleading as the provision of bridleways on the Coastal Plain is very limited, restricting access for cyclists and equestrians. Upgrading suitable PRoW to bridleways would improve access for all NMUs and contribute to the West Sussex Transport Plan (2011-2016) to improve safety for all road users.
Policy S23 : Transport and Accessibility bullet point 8 - inclusion of PRoW is welcomed
Policy S32: Design Strategies for Strategic and Major Development Sites
Bullet points b, e & g - the aims of these are welcomed but any new routes are linked from new developments to the wider PRoW and access networks
Policy AL1 : Land West of Chichester
Para 4 - this development provides an opportunity to improve access links to the wider access network
Para 10 - there is an opportunity here to provide a multi-user PRoW for all NMUs
Policy AL2: Land at Shopwyke (Oving Parish)
Para 9 - any bridge should be for all NMUs, including equestrians, to reinstate the route severed when the A27 was re-aligned.
Policies AL3 - AL14 - opportunities for the provision of green infrastructure links to the wider countryside within these Policies are welcomed. It is particularly relevant to the Coastal Plain where the current provision of multi-user routes is very limited. Improvements in this area would comply with the objectives of the West Sussex Rights of Way Management Pan 2018-2028.

DM15 Horticultural Development - there is an opportunity within the Runcton area to enhance and upgrade routes for NMUs should the land be used for housing at a later date.
Policy DM23 Green Infrastructure
Para 7.185 - the examples should specifically include PRoW.
Bullet point 4 - more positive wording to recognise the improvement proposals could make to the access networks is preferred.
Policy DM34 Open Space, Sport and Recreation.... - the aim to retain, enhance, enhance access and increase the quantity and quality of PROW and the links to them is supported. This would be of great benefit to all NMUs is all new routes/links are multi-user.

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2415

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: South Downs National Park Authority

Representation Summary:

We note that Policy AL4 (Land at Westhampnett/NE Chichester) still refers to Lavant Valley greenspace but we query if this is likely to be secured now based on planning applications submitted. We would suggest that criteria 12, last sentence, could also refer to securing offsite improvements/upgrades for cycleway links

Full text:

The SDNPA and all relevant authorities are required to have regard to the purposes of the South Downs National Park (SDNP) as set out in Section 62 of the Evironment Act 1995. The purposes are 'to conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the area' and 'to promote opportunities for the understanding and enjoyment of the special qualities of the national park by the public.' The Authority would appreciate reference to Section 62 being added to
paragraph 1.31 of the draft Plan.

Duty to Cooperate

As set out in our previous response, the SDNPA has a set of six strategic cross-boundary priorities.
I would like to take the opportunity to again highlight these which provide a framework for ongoing Duty to Cooperate discussions:
* Conserving and enhancing the natural beauty of the area.
* Conserving and enhancing the region's biodiversity (including green infrastructure issues).
* The delivery of new homes, including affordable homes and pitches for Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Showpeople.
* The promotion of sustainable tourism.
* Development of the local economy.
* Improving the efficiency of transport networks by enhancing the proportion of travel by sustainable modes and promoting policies which reduce the need to travel.

Conserving and enhancing the natural beauty

We welcome the requirement in policies S26 (Natural Environment) and DM28 (Natural Environment) to ensure that development proposals have no adverse impact on the openness of views and setting of the SDNP. It is noted that a substantial amount of new homes are proposed on the A259 corridor between Emsworth and Chichester. This is a sensitive stretch of land in the coastal
plain between the coast, the south coast railway and the A27. This corridor provides the connection, including intervisibility, between the protected landscapes of the South Downs National Park and Chichester Harbour AONB, for example views of the channels within the Harbour from the Trundle and Stoke Clump.
We note the intention of identifying settlement gaps and look forward to seeing the evidence base and the proposed gaps in the Regulation 19 iteration of Chichester Local Plan Review 2035, particularly as to how they will contribute to safeguarding the relationship between the SDNP and Chichester Harbour AONB. We would welcome the opportunity to work with CDC on this matter.

Locations identified for development

Development in the CDC Local Plan Review 2035, particularly along the A259 (policies AL7 Highgrove Farm Bosham, AL9 Fishbourne Parish, AL10 Chidham and Hambrook Parish, AL13 Southbourne Parish) corridor, have the potential to deliver a significant cumulative adverse impact on the setting of the National Park and its important relationship with the Chichester Harbour AONB.
We consider that the policy wording for the A259 corridor Strategic Site Allocations could be more robust and proactive with regard to conserving and enhancing the National Park. In particular, it could provide more active direction to applicants in order to ensure adverse impacts are minimised locally, and in relation to the National Park. For example, with regard to green infrastructure, each of the
A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies (AL7, AL9, AL10 and AL13) include a criteria requiring the provision of green infrastructure, and we would suggest this could be re-worded as follows: 'Identify opportunities are taken for and secure the expansion and provision of multifunctional green infrastructure into the wider countryside and protected landscapes of the South Downs National Park, and Chichester Harbour AONB, including between settlements and facilities.'

Reference to considering and minimising impact on the SDNP in each of the A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies (AL7, AL9, AL10 and AL13) is welcomed, for example criterion 5 of policy AL9:
Fishbourne Parish. However, this could be usefully re-worded to ensure that developers do not create a scheme and only consider the impact afterwards. Wording to direct people to 'respect and respond to the National Park landscape, its setting and purposes prior to development design' avoids the risk of relying upon ill-informed and inappropriate mitigation measures This matter could also be usefully
addressed in relevant Strategic and Development Management policies elsewhere in the Local Plan concerning design, landscape, and the South Downs National Park. We would be happy to work with CDC on this matter.

We note Strategic Policy S32, which requires proposals for housing allocations and major development sites to be accompanied by a site-wide design strategy. We would strongly encourage masterplans and development briefs for each allocation (or settlement where the sites are to be allocated through a Neighbourhood Plan) to come ahead of applications and demonstrate positive design interventions which respond directly to landscape/SDNP sensitivities. We would be happy to be involved in shaping these as consultees in order to achieve the best quality scheme. These interventions could be written in to the policy wording.

There is an opportunity for allocation policies to seek to deliver the joining up of existing, and/or improvements to, the network of RoW (Equestrians, Cyclists and Pedestrians) to enable and encourage access into the National Park in accordance with the National Park's Second Purpose.
Further comments on specific allocations:
* Policy AL1 (Land West of Chichester) - We welcome the consideration of the Centurion Way in criteria 10. However, we would ask for stronger policy wording to explicitly state that development must not adversely affect, and preferably enhance usability of, Centurion Way connecting Chichester with the SDNP.
* We note that Policy AL4 (Land at Westhampnett/NE Chichester) still refers to Lavant Valley greenspace but we query if this is likely to be secured now based on planning applications submitted. We would suggest that criteria 12, last sentence, could also refer to securing offsite improvements/upgrades for cycleway links
* Policy AL6 (Land South-West of Chichester (Apuldram and Donnington Parishes)) should address the important opportunity to secure a safe off-road connection between the Centurion Way and Salterns Way as the two flagship and largely safe off-road multi-user trails linking Chichester with (respectively) SDNP and Chichester Harbour AONB. We would welcome the opportunity for further dialogue and joint working on this matter with CDC.
* We welcome criterion 5 of policy AL14 (Land West of Tangmere). It is a sensitive site due to the impact on clear views of the site from important locations in the SDNP such as the Trundle and Halnaker Hill. We therefore ask that criterion 5 is expanded to emphasise and address the sensitivity of the site
Specific wording comments on other policies/paragraphs:

We have the following comments on the following specific paragraphs:
* Para 2.29 (challenges and opportunities facing the Plan Area): We suggest that the 7th bullet point should say 'Protect and enhance the character of the area including the Chichester Harbour AONB and the setting of the SDNP'.
* Policy S20 (Design): As mentioned above regarding the A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies, we consider that the wording of this policy could be more proactive by including wording to direct people to 'respect and respond to the National Park landscape, its setting and purposes prior to development design'.
* Policy S25 (The Coast): Paragraph 5.44: We suggest adding 'serves to provide important scenic views from the water across to the SDNP which should be conserved'.
* Policy S26 (Natural Environment): We suggest deleting reference to 'openness' and to include reference to views from and to the National Park.
* Policy S32 (Design Strategies for Strategic and Major Development Sites): We suggest that the policy requires such design strategies to be informed by landscape character and the sites landscape context. We also suggest that criteria h. includes a requirement to state maximum building heights.
* Policy DM17 (Stand-alone Renewable Energy): The policy requirement for demonstrating no significant adverse impact upon landscape or townscape character is welcomed. We request reference is also made specifically of views of the SDNP.
* Policy DM19 (Chichester Harbour AONB): We request criterion three also identifies the relationship by way of intervisibility between the AONB and SDNP.
* Policy DM22 (Development in the Countryside): Further to comments on the A259 Strategic Site Allocation policies and S20 (Design), we consider that the wording of this policy could be more proactive by including wording to direct people to 'respect and respond to the National Park landscape, its setting and purposes prior to development design'.
* Policy DM23 (Lighting): The reference to the South Downs International Dark Skies Reserve is welcomed. However, proposals that aren't immediately adjacent to the Reserve may have significant adverse impact, for example due to the site's particular visibility within the landscape or sky glow; we suggest that wording is amended to reflect this.
* Policy DM32 (Green Infrastructure): We suggest that this policy could benefit from specifically citing that green infrastructure should be 'multifunctional'. We also recommend reference to opportunities to make better green infrastructure connections in line with Lawton Principles of 'bigger, better, more joined up', to ensure these spaces can function and therefore deliver benefits.

Conserving and enhancing the region's biodiversity (including green infrastructure).

The SDNPA welcomes the approach taken by CDC to identify green infrastructure and habitats networks as cross boundary issues in paragraph 1.26 of the Plan. The SDNPA looks forward to continuing to work with CDC on green infrastructure matters particularly as your Plan is progressed to pre-submission.

We note that an open space study has been prepared and this could be linked up with other work into a wider green infrastructure approach incorporating the identified strategic wildlife corridors, areas for natural flood management, PROW and connections between the settlements, protected landscapes and the stations, landscape views/settlement gaps and some land management guidelines
for these really important areas. This would be particularly useful to inform development proposals in the A259 corridor.

Policy SD30 - Strategic wildlife corridors

The SDNPA very much welcomes and supports the inclusion into policy of wildlife corridors which traverse the district connecting the two protected landscapes of the Chichester Harbour AONB and the SDNPA.

It is important to note that there is no corresponding policy within South Downs Local Plan, currently at examination, to continue protection of the wildlife corridors within the SDNP. We have concerns that it is unlikely to be sufficient for the corridors just to reach the SDNP boundary. We also note that several of the corridors appear to be quite narrow, especially to the east of the City, and we query whether they are substantial enough to perform the intended function.

We note the detailed evidence outlined in the background paper and the SDNPA would like to work with CDC on the continued development of the strategic wildlife corridors, in particular with regard to their connection points with the National Park and how we can work together on robustly delivering this strategic cross boundary objective.

Ebernoe Common, The Mens, and Singleton & Cocking Special Areas of Conservation

The SDNPA has been working together on technical advice to facilitate sustainable development within proximity Ebernoe Common, The Mens, and Singleton & Cocking Special Areas of Conservation, which are designated for their populations of Bechstein and barbastelle bats. The draft Sussex Bat Special Area of Conservation Planning and Landscape Scale Enhancement Protocol was published in 2018 in the Core Document Library as part of the South Downs Local Plan Examination. The Protocol is based on published data which identifies key impact zones, one of 6.5km and one of 12km, around each of the three SACs. It also sets out avoidance, mitigation, compensation and enhancement measures to inform and be addressed by development proposals. Parts of the Chichester District Local Plan area are within these key impact zones. These zones have been incorporated into policy SD10 of the South Downs Local Plan and the policy has not been modified by the Inspector as a result of the examination in public. The SDNPA would welcome the opportunity for further discuss with CDC and Natural England on this work.
Solent Recreation Mitigation Partnership

Both CDC and the SDNPA are members of the Solent Recreation Mitigation Partnership (SRMP) (also known as Bird Aware Solent) which has provided a strategic mitigation solution to address potential harm to the protected habitat at Chichester Harbour and ensuring compliance with the Habitats Regulations. We note that the SRMP mitigation solution is reflected in Policy DM30 and we look forward to continuing to work with CDC and other members of the SRMP on this matter.
With regard to paragraph 7.185 we suggest reference to the Medmerry Realignment be a new bullet point: 'Medmerry realignment, which is intertidal habitat created in 2013 to compensate for historic losses across the Solent to SSSI and Natura 2000 sites'.
We also suggest the following wording amendment to paragraph 7.187: '...This is particularly relevant to Chichester and Langstone Harbour and Pagham Harbour and the impact of recreational pressure on the birds that use these Special Protection Areas. Any negative impacts that the development may have should will be weighed against the benefits of the proposal. This may include looking at whether the assets are surplus to requirements, if the proposal impacts on a small area or corridor or if a wider need exists for the development and there is no alternative location....'

The delivery of new homes, including affordable homes and pitches for Gypsies,
Travellers and Travelling Showpeople

Policy S4: Meeting Housing Needs
The SDNPA welcomes the uplift to the housing target to address unmet need arising in that part of the SDNP within Chichester District (estimated at 44 dpa at the time the last Statement of Common Ground was agreed in April 2018). The provision of 41 dpa broadly meets this need.
We note that the Objectively Assessed Need is calculated only for the area outside the SDNP using the 'capping' method set out in the Government's standard methodology (the currently adopted target of 435 dwellings per annum plus 40% = 609) - this is helpful as it makes a clear distinction between the assessed need for Chichester District Local Plan area and that for the SDNPA, notwithstanding
the Duty to Cooperate.

Policy S5: Parish Housing Requirements 2016-35
We support identification of parish specific housing requirements providing certainty to local communities. This is the same approach as we have taken in the South Downs Local Plan.

Affordable housing
We note that there is a need for 285 affordable homes per annum (source: HEDNA) which underlines the need for a strong policy which seeks to maximise affordable housing delivery. This high level of need is common to the wider sub-region and is an issue relevant to the wider housing market area.
The SDNPA supports CDC's approach of taking opportunities arising from new residential development to contribute to the supply of affordable housing, to meet local needs in terms of type and tenure (paragraph 4.35). In this respect, it is important that the whole plan viability testing currently being undertaken should fully reflect Planning Practice Guidance on viability, such that as high as possible a percentage of affordable housing is sought. We also support the positive approach to Community Land Trusts (CLTs) as a mechanism for delivering affordable housing (paragraph 4.45). Chichester District Council may also wish to note that SDNPA has, subject to main modifications consultation, received the go-ahead from its Local Plan Inspector for unmodified inclusion of Strategic Policy SD28: Affordable Housing in the South Downs Local Plan. This includes a lower threshold than that advised in Government policy, and also seeks on-site affordable housing from small sites below the 11 threshold stipulated in Government policy.

Policy S7: Meeting Gypsies, Travellers, Travelling Showpeoples' Needs
The SDNPA supports the principle of the policy and whilst noting the significant need arising. It is not clear whether the intention is to allocate sites to meet the need in a separate DPD. Paragraph 4.49
refers to 'the forthcoming DPD' and policy S7 to sites being allocated in a Site Allocation DPD 'where there is a shortfall in provision'. Has this work already been triggered by the scale of need? The policy and associated text could be clearer on this matter.
We would like to highlight that there is limited capacity within the National Park to allocate sites for Gypsies and Travellers through DtC, given significant landscape constraints. We suggest that the coastal authorities and SDNPA continue to work closely with regards addressing the need.

Improving the efficiency of transport networks by enhancing the proportion of travel by sustainable modes and promoting policies which reduce the need to travel
The SDNPA supports in principle Policy S23 (Transport and Accessibility). In particular, we support emphasis on encouragement of use of sustainable modes. We suggest explicit support in the text for improving links into the National Park, particularly by sustainable and active transport modes.
Allocation policies should also should seek to deliver the joining up of existing, and/or improvements to, the network of Public Rights of Way.

SDNPA notes reference in the policy to a coordinated package of improvements to the A27 Chichester Bypass, as well as to a new road from the Fishbourne roundabout. The SDNPA would urge that any such schemes be fully assessed, including streetlighting, for potential adverse impacts on landscape where there is a relationship with the National Park and its setting. Any such impact will
need to be mitigated, and opportunities taken to enhance green infrastructure networks and public rights of way networks. CDC may wish to consider whether the Policy S23 should include additional wording to reflect these principles.

Centurion Way
The SDNPA supports the reference to Centurion Way in paragraph 7.185 in relation to Green Infrastructure & resistance to dissection of green movement corridors. There are opportunities to improve these links, for example, suggest explicit reference to protecting and enhancing the Centurion Way. The reference to Salterns Way is also supported. Centurion Way and Salterns Way are two flagship off-road routes for the SDNP and AONB respectively and do not currently benefit
from safe off-road connection. The SDNPA would strongly support policy to secure this connection and would welcome opportunities to discuss this further and work jointly with CDC on this strategic issue.

With regard to Strategic Policy S14 (Chichester City Transport Strategy) we request that the SDNP is included in the penultimate bullet point as a destination for strategic cycle routes.

Transport evidence
We would highlight that the transport assessment carried out to inform the South Downs Local Plan.
This indicated a potential severe impact on the Petersfield Road / Bepton Road / Rumbolds Hill junction in Midhurst of additional development in the town, in the context of junctions already becoming overcapacity due to background traffic growth, for example, . arising from strategic development in neighbouring planning authorities.
A review of the CDC Transport Study of Strategic Development indicates significant traffic growth arising from Scenario 1 (the preferred strategy). It is not clear from the study how this will impact on the A286 towards Midhurst, which in turn could have a critical impact on junction capacity at Midhurst.
SDNPA may seek further assurance that such potential impacts have been looked at, and appropriate mitigation sought.
Other comments
Page 16 - Local Plan area map: Request clarification whether the Local Plan area includes the following two properties, as not clear from the Local Plan Area map: Stedlands Farm, and The Stable/Little Stedlands, Haslemere GU273DJ
We would like to wish you well in the progression of your Local Plan and would welcome further discussion and joint working on the strategic cross boundary matters raised.

Attachments:

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2660

Received: 04/02/2019

Respondent: Mr Mike Dicker

Representation Summary:

Site should be considered for employment space:
- Proximity to other businesses in the area
- Employment opportunities for SDNP
- Limited floodplain impact
- Overcomes noise sensitive impact
- Outside safe air corridor
- Good access to A27


See attached for full detail.

Full text:

Full detailed submission for the Local Plan and supporting evidence is attached.

The representations attached to this submission reflect a high level summary of the detailed submission and do not contain the full level of detail received.

High level comments received:

a. The transport study conducted by Peter Brett Associates (PBA) is not fit for purpose and needs to be rewritten. The scope set for PBA is far too constraining and counters the democratic process agreed by the council to seek alternative routes.

b. Many of the documents are inconsistent and in their current form smack of inconsistency and bias. Reasons for excluding some strategic sites are not consistently used for other sites.

c. Many of the evidence documents are not present or are not complete for this consultation. These will need to be re consulted when they are complete.

d. CDC should not be accepting the unmet housing need from the South Downs National Park (SDNP). They should also be going back to government to insist that until certainty is provided on the A27 this area can not accommodate future housing and or employment space.

e. The proposed link road was resoundly rejected last time it was proposed by Highways England. CDC need to respect the voices that rejected what is option 2 by stealth. Particularly as the PBA report states that the building of the link road will offer other "strategic options". This will not be tolerated locally.

Attachments:

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 2750

Received: 07/02/2019

Respondent: Sussex Wildlife Trust

Representation Summary:

SWT are concerned about the suggestion of a 'new linear greenspace with public access' along the River Lavant floodplain. Any progression of this would need to consider the potential impacts of recreational disturbance on riverine habitats. We also recommend that there is assessment of the potential for any greenspace to contribute to natural flood management of the river.

As stated for the previous allocations, SWT recommend that the policy is amended in terms of its ambitions for green infrastructure provision and biodiversity net gains:

Full text:

See attachment

Attachments:

Object

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3359

Received: 05/02/2019

Respondent: CEG

Agent: Nexus Planning Ltd

Representation Summary:

Object to CDC's failure to consider/allocate additional land within SDL for residential development.

There is additional land within the existing SDL boundary, to the east of the River Lavant, that is available and suitable for development as detailed in Appendix 1. This amounts to 7.1ha of land outside the 400m indicative buffer which could accommodate approx. 250 dwellings (35dph density).

Full text:

See attachment

Comment

Local Plan Review: Preferred Approach 2016-2035

Representation ID: 3521

Received: 06/02/2019

Respondent: HMPC Ltd

Representation Summary:

A sound planning approach to the use of land south of Lavant Straight, between the A285 and A286, will ensure policy objectives within that area are complementary, and do not detract from the setting of either the historic city or national park. The land should be kept open primarily with the exception of appropriate development around the settlements of Westhampnett, Westerton, Strettington, and at Goodwood Aerodrome and Motor Circuit (as more specifically controlled through other policies of the plan). The land should be used for agriculture, countryside, forestry, public access and other landscape purposes.

Full text:

The Goodwood Estates Ltd welcomes the opportunity to again participating in shaping the future of the District through this review of the local plan. The authority will be well aware of the Estate's firm view on the future scale, shape and form of Chichester to ensure that it retains the very special characteristics that underlie its economic success.

Development to meet the growing needs of the City and its environs must be accommodated if the District is to prosper and grow, but this should not mean a &quot;free-hand&quot; for developers on each and every undeveloped 'greenfield' around the City. Development of the next area of undeveloped land adjacent to the city's existing boundaries does not mean it is the most sustainable approach for the community as a whole. It is all too easy for landowners, at a time of acute housing demand, to promote sites as the next closest to available services (often 'as the crow flies') providing housing quickly to meet that undeniable need. The north and north-eastern edges of the city are vulnerable in this regard, an area for which the maintenance of openness is essential for the sustainable and sound interrelationship of Chichester with the neighbouring national park.

Up and down the country, the negative effects of suburban housing growth promoted on that basis are experienced; often without a true recognition of infrastructure needs and a consequential increase in car borne journeys and loss of greenspace. Equally the often, bland design and over-developed sub-urban layouts, tacked on to urban edges, may mathematically meet local needs and offer people an opportunity to own or rent a home, but consequentially erode the community and character of locations to the long-term detriment of its economic base, identity and community distinctiveness; this is particularly true of cities such as Chichester, where the overall character and ambience underpins much of its economic success.

The authority will be well aware of the &quot;Cathedral Cities Initiative&quot;, which seeks to recognise the economic and heritage importance of protecting the form and context of the country's important cathedral cities and historic market towns. By providing clear, precise and 'joined up' planning policy protection, that directs new development and associated infrastructure appropriately to sites best able to accommodate it in terms of benefits to the community as a whole (offering benefits in excess of the provision of additional homes and not just the individual interests of the landowner 'dressed up' as offering wider local benefit) it will prevent inappropriate inner-urban and sub-urban development that will cumulatively destroy the true character and distinctiveness of the city.

Chichester is used as an exemplar in the Cathedral Cities initiative, promoted initially at the time of formulating the last local plan for the District, where there was a real threat unchecked urban expansion would undermine the very essence of the District's local economy. That threat has been reduced through this local plan by changes to strategic allocations, but the threat remains from unscrupulous developers and landowners who will continue to exploit the 'loop hole' provided by a lack of housing supply or incomplete planning policy position (potentially an acute situation until this plan is adopted). It is essential this plan not only makes provision to meet objectively assessed housing and employment needs but equally ensures that essential open areas, around and within the city, which contribute positively to its setting, character and economic vitality are given long-term protection through specific policy designation.

The NPPF is explicit that sustainability is a true balance of social, economic and environmental considerations. This means the plan must represent a true reflection of the suitability of a location to accommodate additional growth in a meaningful way. It must not apply the over simplified, developer led approach that the next piece of available land nearest the centre must be sustainable and developed for housing. A robust strategy will look at all sites within the district making use of all appropriate and available land within urban areas, surrounding settlements and along transport corridors, as well as the &quot;easy pickings&quot; on the urban edges. Development sites further from the city centre ,can often prove more sustainable in terms of the NPPF sustainability balance than sites that comprise the next undeveloped site on the urban edge. Any development promoted must, as a minimum, ensure that it demonstrates a positive response to the sustainability balance, not just meeting a mathematical housing need, and provide appropriately, not only for the infrastructure needs of the housing to be provided , but also for the community as a whole; too many development proposals focus simply on the needs of the individual site giving rise to the many real concerns of local people that the community does not have the capacity to absorb additional housing.

The Estate is therefore heartened to see the council taking a bold step through this Local Plan Review to reconsider previous development scenarios, while ensuring that a true level of housing need is accommodated. Paragraphs 4.30 to 4.33 recognise it is not sustainable to continue to rely on past sources of supply. We support this stance fully and encourage the council to take the initiative forward even at this early stage. As stated in the draft plan, there is a long lead in time to such a fundamental and complex change of direction in strategic development, but without a meaningful start now old habits will continue, resulting in an increasing unsustainable City and loss of the very factors that undermine its economic success. There is an inevitability that developers and landowners affected by the changes, will, through planning applications and appeals, do their utmost to ensure their individual interests are protected, over and above the long-term impacts of inappropriate developments on the community as a whole. To counter such proposals in the short term, this plan must set out a logical, precise and robust strategy that follows all up to date Government advice in a positive and sustainable manner

The Estate believes a sound planning strategy set out in this local plan review can deliver ample development land within the district in a manner that will meet housing and employment needs while protecting the very important transitional relationship offered by land between the urban edge and the SDNP boundary. This will involve a step change from past trends of allocating the next area of land as development locations, to be focussed more on evolving settlement hubs on good transport routes, such as around Tangmere, and allowing appropriate scales of development to sustain rural settlements that have to date be excluded from growth considerations. This will involve an on-going dialogue with adjoining authorities under the duty to co-operate to ensure future development is located in sustainable locations where it is most appropriate and not simply in locations of least (often political or subjective) resistance. The Estate will support the council in its emerging strategy and looks forward to working alongside it in the pursuit of a sustainable social, economic and environmental future.

The district is both fortunate but equally unfortunate to have a large part of its area within the National Park, a similarity it shares with the Estate. The purpose and objectives of the Park are acknowledged and supported, and the Estate continues to work with SDNP to establish a planning regime that recognises the true role of landed estates in establishing the character and form of the National Park. This includes the generation of planning policy and proposals through the emerging National Park Local Plan, that recognise the importance of allowing estates to continue to evolve such that the character of the National Park can be sustained. This includes an appropriate planning approach that allows justified estate development, which may at times appear 'at odds' with general national park objectives.

It is the Estate's belief the Park has not considered the true development capacity of its area and this will have unintended consequences on communities, not only within the Park itself, but also within surrounding districts. If the Park is to avoid development up to its boundary, in part a response to its own displaced needs, it is important the District retains existing open land to the north and north east of the city, permitting only new development and activity that are appropriate to a rural area, complement existing land uses and or which maintain the essential openness of the area.

Land between the city and National Park is an area that must be governed by landscape priorities that provide a crucial open, and where deliverable, accessible green space to the city community, but equally provides
(a) clear linkages to the national park,
(b) protects the integrity of the National Park boundary, and
(c) protects the important relationship and setting of city and Park.
Definition of the City Boundary (Plan SB1) should not simply be a red line on a plan, but supported by clear policies and proposals to encourage the boundary to be enhanced and defended.

The Estate owns a significant &quot;buffer&quot; area between the National Park and City (Goodwood Estate Plan 1) and will continue to work closely with both the Council and the SDNPA to achieve such an objective; to establish an appropriate planning policy regime for land between the city edge and National Park. A sound planning approach to the use of land south of Lavant Straight, between the A285 and A286, will ensure policy objectives within that area are complementary, and do not detract from the setting of either the historic city or national park. The land should be kept open primarily with the exception of appropriate development around the settlements of Westhampnett, Westerton, Strettington, and at Goodwood Aerodrome and Motor Circuit (as more specifically controlled through other policies of the plan). The land should be used for agriculture, countryside, forestry, public access and other landscape purposes.

Through representations to this local plan, set out in individual comments to policies and sections, the Estate seeks to demonstrate its commitment to the future sustainability of Chichester and its community through appropriate use of this &quot;buffer area.&quot;

New policies proposed through the Local Plan, such as those proposed for the Goodwood Motor Circuit and Aerodrome, provide a positive response to the above objectives and are to be supported. Provision of a &quot;Whole Estate Plan&quot; for Goodwood as required by policies contained in the emerging National Park Local Plan, will provide a planning policy context that straddles the District/National Park boundary. The District Local Plan should acknowledge this approach and ensure that its policies do not conflict.